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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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than a cord when she was surprised by a gang of guerrillas, who took possession of her and moved her to the opposite side of the river, and after rolling out about thirty hogsheads of sugar, set her on fire. Captain McKiege and the engineer, William Dewey, were detained as prisoners, but the rest of the crew were given their liberty--New Orleans Delta, December 2. A skirmish occurred between a scouting-party from Captain Mear's Maryland Home Guard, stationed at Berlin, and a body of Bob White's rebel cavalry, in which the latter were put to flight with a loss of two men.-General Curtis, at St. Louis, Mo., reported to the War Department at Washington, that a cavalry expedition, under Major Torry, to the forks of the Mingo and St. Francis Rivers, had captured Colonel Phelan and ten men of the rebel army. The Savannah Republican says that the people of Charleston, S. C., have pulled up their lead pipes and contributed sixty thousand pounds to the government, and that the gove
port of the operations of the regiment, from the first of August to this date.--(Doc. 56.) The British schooner George, from Nassau, N. P., laden with coffee, salt, etc., was captured off Indian River, Florida, by the United States gunboat Sagamore, Lieutenant Commanding Earle English.--Official confirmation of the hostile plans of Little Crow, and a portion of the northern Indians, was this day received by W. P. Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the United States.--St. Paul Press, January 1, 1863. A Union boat expedition, under the command of Acting Master Gordon, proceeded up Bell River, La., and captured an armed rebel launch, mounting a twelve-pounder brass howitzer.--This morning, Gen. Slocum, with a body of National troops, had a skirmish with the rebel cavalry, under White, Henderson, and Baylor, near Charlestown, Va., and succeeded in routing them. This evening he again attacked them at Berryville, killing five and wounding eighteen.--General Slocum's Report.
trong body of rebel troops under the command of General Evans, resulting in a retreat of the rebels, and the capture and occupation of the town by the Unionists. In this affair a rebel battery of field-pieces and four hundred prisoners were taken.--(Doc. 73.) At Helena, Ark., a picket-guard, consisting of a Lieutenant and twenty-three men of the Sixth Missouri, were surrounded and made prisoners by a party of rebel guerrillas.--A skirmish took place at Woodsonville, Tenn., without any result.-This evening about eight o'clock, a body of rebel cavalry under Major White, made a raid into Poolesville, Md., and captured a party of the Scott Nine Hundred cavalry.--A wagontrain, laden with provisions and clothing for the troops at Ringgold Barracks, Texas, escorted by a small party of soldiers on the way from Fort Brown to the Barracks, was this day attacked by a party of Mexicans and captured. All the soldiers and teamsters, except one man who escaped, were killed.--Brownsville Flag.
until such time as he could join the Union army. Continuing his search for the steamboats, he came upon the home of Bob White, on Walden Ridge. White was a thorough Unionist and the leader of a body of thirty to sixty Union Tennesseans, bushwacWhite was a thorough Unionist and the leader of a body of thirty to sixty Union Tennesseans, bushwackers, who were the terror of the rebel cavalry in that region. He was welcomed by White's family and remained with them one night, though the rebel cavalry came to the house in search of him, and White's men also called him up, fearing he might be White's family and remained with them one night, though the rebel cavalry came to the house in search of him, and White's men also called him up, fearing he might be a spy. After stirring up the rebels at one or two points, and again finding shelter for two or three nights among the persecuted East Tennessee Unionists, attending one of their religious meetings where every man was armed, and the services were conWhite's men also called him up, fearing he might be a spy. After stirring up the rebels at one or two points, and again finding shelter for two or three nights among the persecuted East Tennessee Unionists, attending one of their religious meetings where every man was armed, and the services were conducted, like those of the Covenanters three hundred years ago, after night and in the concealment of the forest, lest their enemies should come upon them. In the battle of Chickamauga, as well as in the marches and skirmishes which preceded it, C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
w uniforms, and were in marked contrast to the poorly clad privates and line officers. The only field officer of the Twelfth Alabama present was Colonel Pickens. There was only one captain in camp, and I was senior first lieutenant, and third in rank. This illustrates the great severity with which the enemy's bullets and camp sickness had dealt with my regiment. An amusing incident during this great review was the whistling by some of the men in perfect imitation of the partridge, or Bob White. They used their lips in imitating the bird whenever Lieutenant and Acting A. G. Daniel Partridge, of General Battle's staff, rode by on his fine horse. The gallant officer was annoyed by this impertinence on the part of the men, whom he could not possibly detect, and whom the company officers would not expose, but he was helpless and had to submit. Sunday morning I was surprised by Adjutant Gayle coming to my tent and informing me that I was in command of the regiment, that Colonel P