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An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 30 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 28 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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le town of Waterford our scouts in Maryland daring of Elijah White capture of McClellan's orderlies. It now appeared, s distant. The most remarkable of these daring fellows, Elijah White, was a rich Maryland planter, who possessed several fineard the jingling of spurs and harness, and looking up, saw White on his grey wearily ambling by. The invitation to take a cnd his mare having been well provided for by the black boy, White was so charmed with the savor of sundry beefsteaks broilingand picket-guards were going out on duty. What's the news, White? asked one. How's all the girls in Maryland? chimed in anbooks have been volumes of lies. That is all very good, White, broke in a fat old captain; but go on with the narrative; one say, That's him; I know his voice, major! That you, White? Yes, that's me; how are you, major? Fine night, isn't itI cantered to town; and here I am. At the conclusion of White's story, we made some hot punch, as best we. could, and wra
d escaped from. the hospitals, knocked over the doctors and parsons who tried to prevent them, and marched out to participate in the fight, and now fell into rank with great good humor! As many more had left the hospitals in the morning contrary to orders, and not knowing the whereabouts of their respective regiments, had directed their steps to the line of fire, and fought manfully. As we ran towards the scene of battle, the roar of the enemy's musketry and cannon was deafening. Lige White, who had been very active all day, rode up to us and confirmed the statement that our small force was nearly surrounded: he knew every inch of the ground perfectly, and piloted us into a position immediately in front of the enemy's centre. The enemy did not expect us in that direction, and a lull in the firing immediately ensued. Our fatigued comrades seemed with one accord to leave the battle entirely to as; and we did not disappoint their flattering expectations. Advancing through the w
t their vengeance seemed insatiable, while an enemy remained in sight. But the most singular incident of the day was Fremont's behavior. Hearing that we had crossed to the east side of the river, and were thrashing Shields's command, he formed his division and marched from Harrisonburgh towards the scene, and finding the bridge gone, began shelling across in all directions; this he continued doing for several hours, so that many who were burying the enemy's dead were killed or maimed. White flags were displayed, but this heroic gentleman would not respect our labors, but continued firing without intermission long after the fight had closed! How very valiant this was! General Patterson, in a recent speech at Philadelphia, gave Fremont's character in brief. He declared that he was a statesman without a speech, a soldier without a battle, and a millionaire with nary red. He could only abbreviate the description by calling him an unmitigated humbug. His staff usually compri
pidly upon Winchester, and accounts came in of several severe skirmishes with the Federals under White, who was said to be falling back upon Harper's Ferry, where General Miles commanded with thirteehis information was given with much secrecy; but I could scarcely credit the idea that Miles and White were such blockheads as not to be aware of the fact that forces were thus secretly massing in di Reports having reached him on the eleventh, while on the banks of the Monocacy, that Miles and White were strongly fortified at Harper's Ferry, and that the Confederates had made no, demonstrations been designed for no other purpose than to occupy the roads and delay McClellan until Miles and White had surrendered. While the shrewd and calculating Hill was deceiving McClellan's advance, Jaumn still proceeded onwards, our cavalry advance having a few hours before handsomely driven Colonel White and the Federal cavalry from Martinsburgh, where many useful stores were discovered and appr
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 15: movement into Maryland. (search)
rch and crossed the Potomac at White's Ford, about seven miles above Leesburg, into Maryland. This ford was an obscure one on the road through the farm of Captain Elijah White, and the banks of the river had to be dug down so that our wagons and artillery might cross. On the Maryland side of the river the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal west of Martinsburg, near which they bivouacked. On the morning of the 12th we moved for Martinsburg, and found that a force of the enemy at that place under General White had retired in the direction of Harper's Ferry on the approach of Hill's division. We passed through the town in the direction of Harper's Ferry and Ewell's de loss of many lives to us. Under the directions of General Jackson, General A. P. Hill received the surrender of the enemy, then under the command of Brigadier General White, Colonel Miles, the commander of the forces at Harper's Ferry, having been mortally wounded. About 11,000 prisoners were surrendered and paroled, and we
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 23: at York and Wrightsville. (search)
he branch railroad from York to Philadelphia. Lieutenant Colonel Elijah White's battalion of cavalry was ordered to report t on the pike directly towards the town with his brigade and White's battalion of cavalry, and I moved with the rest of the co. Gordon moving along the pike, with about forty men of White's cavalry in front, as an advance guard, encountered a miltysburg, which fled across the fields at the first sight of White's advance party without waiting to see what was in the rear railroad buildings of any consequence. I then ordered Colonel White to proceed with his battalion early the next morning alone dead militiaman, and captured twenty prisoners. Colonel White succeeded in reaching Hanover Junction and destroying t the way of Aaronsburg, as circumstances might require, Colonel White being directed to move his battalion of cavalry on theI received at that place information, by a courier from Colonel White, that a cavalry and infantry force had been at Abbotsto
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
inally ran out a few pieces of artillery and opened at long range, without doing any damage. My division was ordered to constitute the rear guard of the army, and White's battalion of cavalry was ordered to accompany me. I waited on the Fairfield road until it had been cleared by the rest of the army, including the other two divisions of Ewell's corps, and then in the afternoon moved off slowly in rear of the army and all the trains, Gordon, followed by White's battalion, bringing up my rear. On arriving in sight of Fairfield, which is situated near the eastern base of South Mountain on a wide low plain or valley surrounded by commanding hills, I found the wagon trains blocked up at the village. While waiting for the road to be cleared of the wagons in front, Colonel White sent me information that a force of the enemy was advancing in my rear, and being on the plain where I would be exposed to a fire of artillery from the surrounding hills, I sent to hasten forward the trains, b
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
onel (U. S. A.), 326, 437 Westover, 88 Western Virginia, 75 Wharton, General G. C., 188, 253, 375, 399, 414-15, 423-27, 429-30, 434, 441-443, 445-47, 449, 452, 457-58, 460, 462-64 Wheat's Battalion, 3, 31 Wheeling, 368 White, Captain, Elijah, 134, 255-58, 261, 263-64, 280 White, General (U. S. A.), 136, 137 White House, 361, 465 White Oak Swamp, 77 White Plains, 54, 114 White Post, 167, 397, 406, 411, 414 White's Ford, 43, 134, 137 Whiting, GeneralW. H., 74-White, General (U. S. A.), 136, 137 White House, 361, 465 White Oak Swamp, 77 White Plains, 54, 114 White Post, 167, 397, 406, 411, 414 White's Ford, 43, 134, 137 Whiting, GeneralW. H., 74-76, 78-79, 86, 88, 105 Whittle, Colonel, 67, 72 Whitworth, 198 Wickham, General W. C., 416, 424- 425-26, 429, 433-34-35, 441, 454, 457 Wilcox, General, 58, 60-61, 208-09, 212, 218, 352, 354, 355, 358 Wilderness, 346, 350-51, 359, 363 Wilderness Tavern, 318 Williams, Colonel, 5, 8 Williams, General (U. S. A.), 148 Williamsburg, 65-68, 70, 71, 73 Williamsport, 135, 162, 281-83, 369, 383, 400, 402-03, 409 Willis' Church, 79 Willis, Colonel, Ed., 362 Willis, Lieut
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
usly on to within a mile of Leesburg, without discovering scarcely a trace of a foe. There he halted in a wood, and sent a courier to General Stone for further orders. Devens had been watched by vigilant Confederates. An English Combatant in the Confederate service, in a volume entitled Battle-Jields of the South, from Bull's Run to Gettysburg (page 80), says that there were several Marylanders in Evans's camp who were employed as spies. Among these was a wealthy young farmer named Elijah White, who resided near Poolesville. He belonged to a company of Confederate cavalry, and often crossed the Potomac by swimming his horse, and gathered valuable information for the insurgents, He sometimes went even to Baltimore, where he held conference with the secessionists, and always returned with assurances that ninety-nine of every hundred of the Marylanders were rebels. Evans and his main force lay on Goose Creek. Riflemen and cavalry were hovering near, and waiting a favorable opport
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. A. Early's report of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
e enemy burned it to thwart my purpose. Colonel Elijah White's battalion of cavalry was ordered to rwn, I sent General Gordon with his brigade and White's battalion of cavalry on the macademised roaddon's command (a body of forty cavalrymen from White's battalion), had encountered a regiment of mimilitia regiment which had been encountered by White's cavalry was the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, cashtown, but had fled on the first approach of White's advance, taking across the fields between Muturned to that place myself that night. Colonel White succeeded in reaching Hanover Junction and might require. I, at the same time, sent Colonel White's cavalry on the turnpike from York towarddon's brigade bringing up my rear, followed by White's battalion of cavalry. I did not leave thed to be cleared, I received a message from Colonel White that a force of the enemy was advancing inns are also due to Colonel French and Lieutenant-Colonel White and their respective cavalry commands[2 more...]
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