hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
sts would be courted by the two political parties at the North; and his words were speedily verified at the approaching Presidential election. The Liberator Lib. 6.163, 167, 175, 181, 182, 183. warned abolitionists against voting for Van Buren, White, or Harrison; opposed the reelection of Governor Everett, and the election to Congress of Richard Fletcher. The Presidential candidates and aspirants were themselves brought to book. General Harrison was decried at the South for believing in the constitutionality of emancipation in the District. Judge White denied the power of Congress, or the expediency of exercising it, in the premises, and pledged himself to Lib. 6.65. act accordingly if elected. Van Buren, with characteristic two-facedness, admitted the power, but said the objections to its exercise, against the will of the South, were so imperative in their nature and obligations as to amount to a want of constitutional power; and gave the same pledge as his rival. He went
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
cret places. Mr. Johnson promptly made a brief reply, in the Lib. 7.131. course of which he quoted a notorious passage from the Southern clergyman's The Rev. Elipha White, a native of Massachusetts (Lib. 7.147). For the Spectator's handling of this clerical man-thief in its issue of July 26, 1837—just one week before it prinor pro tem.; its spirit is bad; the appellants—some, at least—had not clean hands, etc., etc. Still, there was cause of complaint. The allusions to Messrs. Rev. Elipha White, Rev. G. W. Blagden. White and Blagden were not right; the discussion of the Sabbath question was injudicious; the doctrines on national and family governmenWhite and Blagden were not right; the discussion of the Sabbath question was injudicious; the doctrines on national and family government are wrong, as most conceive; and the spirit exhibited by the editor pro tem., and sometimes by yourself, has not been Sufficiently kind and Christ-like. If, then, the Emancipator had come out, it would have censured the authors of the Appeal and the Liberator also. It was not best to do this prematurely, if at all. It may be ne<
Boston Fem. A. S. S., 420; calls Chardon St. Convention, 422. Spectator (N. E.), anti-slavery paper, 1.472, 2.36, 134; edited by W. S. Porter, 175; exposes Rev. E. White, 138; bought by Gulliver, 158; publishes Clerical Appeal, 136, 137, letter from J. T. Woodbury, 141, 152, calls for orthodox A. S. organization, 173, accuses G Mass., July 28, 1859], 1.305. Whipple, Charles King [b. Newburyport, Mass, Nov. 17, 1808], 2.326. Whitby, Daniel, Rev., 2.110. White, Adams, 1.391. White, Elipha, Rev., pro-slavery, 2.138, 163. White, Hugh Lawson [1773-1840], mail tampered with, 1.500; election opposed by Lib., 2.81. White, James C., Rev. [b. LancastWhite, Hugh Lawson [1773-1840], mail tampered with, 1.500; election opposed by Lib., 2.81. White, James C., Rev. [b. Lancaster, Mass., 1806], 1.221. White, Lydia, free-produce store, 1.264; attends Nat. A. S. Convention, 398. White, Nathaniel H., 1.80. White slaves, Northern, 1.134. Whiting, Nathaniel H., 2.293. Whitman, Benjamin, 2.28. Whitson, Thomas [b. July 2, 1796; d. Nov. 24, 1864], 1.398.—Portrait in Smedley's Hist. Underground R. R