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ana James of Watertown about Aug. 1640; their marriage contract is dated 11 Aug. 1640. He d. 1652, leaving an only son Samuel, b. about 1621. His w. Reana m. Robert Daniel 2 May 1654, who d. 6 July 1655, and she then m. a fourth husband, Elder Edmund Frost, whom also she survived. The date of her death does not appear. 2. Samuel, s. of William (1), inherited the homestead, which he sold in 1680, and purchased the estate at the N. E. corner of Dunster and Mt. Auburn streets. He m. Elizabeth White, 22 Sept. 1652, and had Samuel, b. 29 Jan. 1655-6; William, b. 7 June 1658; John, b. 2 Mar. 1660-61, d. 30 May 1693; Elizabeth, b. 5 Ap. 1663, m. William Gedney of Salem, 25 May 1704; Thomas, b. 13 May 1665, d. 24 Feb. 1666-7; Mary, b. 28 Dec. 1666, d. 20 June 1667; Thomas, b. 23 March 1667-8, had been missing four years, in 1698, and does not appear to have returned afterwards; Mary, b. 22 Feb. 1671-2, d. 29 Feb. 1671-2; Jonathan, named in his father's will as the youngest son, 1698, d
ana James of Watertown about Aug. 1640; their marriage contract is dated 11 Aug. 1640. He d. 1652, leaving an only son Samuel, b. about 1621. His w. Reana m. Robert Daniel 2 May 1654, who d. 6 July 1655, and she then m. a fourth husband, Elder Edmund Frost, whom also she survived. The date of her death does not appear. 2. Samuel, s. of William (1), inherited the homestead, which he sold in 1680, and purchased the estate at the N. E. corner of Dunster and Mt. Auburn streets. He m. Elizabeth White, 22 Sept. 1652, and had Samuel, b. 29 Jan. 1655-6; William, b. 7 June 1658; John, b. 2 Mar. 1660-61, d. 30 May 1693; Elizabeth, b. 5 Ap. 1663, m. William Gedney of Salem, 25 May 1704; Thomas, b. 13 May 1665, d. 24 Feb. 1666-7; Mary, b. 28 Dec. 1666, d. 20 June 1667; Thomas, b. 23 March 1667-8, had been missing four years, in 1698, and does not appear to have returned afterwards; Mary, b. 22 Feb. 1671-2, d. 29 Feb. 1671-2; Jonathan, named in his father's will as the youngest son, 1698, d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Lieut. Walter Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. (search)
of Federal cavalay, and taken to the Old Capitol, at Washington, a prisoner, where he remained until the close of the war. The rest of our party, now reduced to eight, our original number, made our way to Virginia, taking the peak of the Sugar-Loaf Mountain as our guide and inspiration, for this overlooked our place of safety—Virginia. The dreary and lonely ride was made in silence and without incident, reaching the mountains about noon, where we rested until dark, when a lady who had two sons in White's Battalion, invited us to supper, and informed us that the pickets on the river had been ordered to Virginia on a raid. This seemed proverbial. After partaking of the hospitality of our benefactress, we crossed the Rubicon in safety—the end of a most eventful raid. John Randolph made a report to Colonel Mosby of our sad casualty, who was much distressed at the loss of such a promising young officer. Jas. G. Wiltshire, 2d Lieut. Mosby's Battalion. Baltimore, Md., May, 19
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
ry his rations in his journey across the Valley of Virginia, such had been the wanton destruction of the growing crops, barns, &c. But soon it leaked out that we were bound for Harper's Ferry, at which point some 11,000 men under command of General White were stationed. So after fording the Potomac again and reaching Virginia we pushed on, gaining the heights overlooking this historic town made famous by the John Brown raid of Oct. 19, 1859, and witnessed the surrender of White's command, White's command, with 11,000 prisoners, seventy-three pieces of artillery, and all of his arms and equipments, the captured troops marching up in regular Cornwallis style. The whole battalion was engaged on the Heights. But there! Stop! Soon we see a courier coming. Something is up! What's the matter? The assembly call is blown. Marching orders are received and soon we are on our way to Sharpsburg, where we were to meet that gentlemanly soldier, General George B. McClellan, who was again in command of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
es, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial and Literary Association of Missouri; Mrs. Leroy Valliant, President; Mrs. Jennie Edwards, Secretary. The Warren Memorial Association, Front Royal, Va.; Mrs. G. C. Davis, President; Mrs. W. C. Weaver, Corresponding Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, Memphis, Tenn.; Mrs. Letitia A. Frazer, President; Phoebe Frazer, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, Fort Mills, S. C.; Mrs. J. B. Mack, President; Mrs. Elizabeth White, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Knoxville, Tenn.; Mrs. Wm. Caswell, President; Mrs. M. E. Lloyd, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Gainesville, Ala.; Mrs. D. H. Williams, President; M. B. Jackson, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, New Orleans, La.; Mrs. W. G. Behan, President; Mrs. Joseph Jones, Corresponding Secretary. The Southern Memorial Association, Fayetteville, Ark.; Mrs. Lizzie Pollard, President; Miss Julia A. Garsid
Sad case of drowning. --A distressing casualty occurred on Saturday last, at Sullivan's Island, near Charleston. South Carolina. A young lady, named Miss Elizabeth White, between twelve and thirteen years of age, and her aunt, but a few years older than her nieces, were nothing in the surf, when the former very suddenly got beyond her depth, and was borne out by the strong current which runs by at that point of the Island.--Her aunt, in endeavoring to render her assistance, was also takenIsland.--Her aunt, in endeavoring to render her assistance, was also taken beyond her depth. The uncle of Miss White, Mr. Thomas F Porcher, who heard their orics, ran and plunged in, and made an attempt to resone his nieces, but was also overpowered by the current, and both were drowned The aunt was saved after desperate efforts by some persons in a boat Miss White was a daughter of Mr. John S white, a planter of St. Johns, Berkeley, and Mr. Porober was a planter reading in the same district.
the next day he would pay her the market rate for the certificate. She called the next morning, and having sworn before a notary that she was L. B. Leath, and that the certificate was her property, Mr. Williams paid her $850 for it. On Friday, he learned, through the newspapers, that the certificate had been stolen from L. B. Leath, a gentleman of Petersburg, at the Petersburg depot, in this city. He at once informed the police of all the circumstances, and they being led to believe, from the description, that a woman named Elizabeth White, living on 8th street, near Cary, was the party who had sold the certificate, went at once and arrested her. When arrested she confessed that she had sold the certificate, but said it had been given her by a youth named Collier. The police then arrested Collier. Both parties were brought before the Mayor on Saturday, when Mr. Leath, the gentleman from whom the certificate had been stolen, being absent, the case was continued till this morning.
The Daily Dispatch: April 22, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Burnside expedition — its Destination Solved. (search)
ckpockets. --On Wednesday a week ago Mr. D. T. Williams, a broker of this city, bought a 4 per cent. Confederate certificate for $1,200 from a woman named Elizabeth White, paying her $840 for it, she at the time swearing before a notary that she was the owner of the certificate, and that her name was L. B. Leath, the name mentioned in the certificate. The next day Mr. Williams learned that the certificate had been stolen from Lewis B. Leath, of Petersburg. Mrs. White was arrested, and said she got the certificate from Thomas Collier, who told the police he had received it from one Lee Whitehurst. Collier, Mrs. White, and Whitehurst, were brought befoMrs. White, and Whitehurst, were brought before the Mayor yesterday, when the above facts were proved, and Whitehurst said he had found the certificate in the street. Mr. Leath said the certificate had been stolen from his pocket while he was in the act of getting into the cars at the Petersburg depot last Wednesday morning a week ago. At that time he noticed a young ma
Burglarious Robberies. --The smokehouse of William H. Macfarland, on the corner of Grace and 6th streets, was forcibly entered on Tuesday night and robbed of twenty-one pieces of bacon, valued at over two thousand dollars. The thieves obtained access to the meat by cutting a hole through the brick walls of the building, backing on Dr. Watson's lot, cut of which it was passed to parties in waiting, and then taken through his alley into the street. The residence of Mrs. Elizabeth White, in Rocketts old field, was broken into on the same evening and robbed of several articles of household furniture. Constable Robinson, of Henrico, yesterday arrested a white man named Thomas Hite, charged with the burglary. Subsequent to his arrest some of the stolen articles were found at George W. Willis's auction rooms, where they had been left for sale by the accused. On the morning preceding the night of the robbery Hite threatened Mrs. H. with his intention to break into her house, and,