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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, Henry Alexander 1868- (search)
White, Henry Alexander 1868- Historian; born in Greenbrier county, Va. (now West Virginia), April 15, 1868; graduated at Washington and Lee University in 1885, and studied at the Union Theological Seminary; was ordained in the Presbyterian Church in 1889; accepted the chair of History in Washington and Lee University. His publications include Robert E. Lee and the Southern Confederacy; Historical addresses, etc.
n fell back, checking the enemy as they advanced through the fields and woods, in line as skirmishers and endeavoring to outflank him, by deploying his men and by an occasional shot from Pendleton's gun. Allen's and Preston's regiments had also been advanced to support Harper if necessary, and once Allen took position for that purpose, but was not brought into action, as Jackson had already accomplished the object of his movement. Before Jackson's arrival on the field, Stuart, leaving Captain White with his company to watch on the main road and fall back before the enemy, had moved forward, by a road farther to the west, to turn Patterson's right flank, and, if possible, capture his advance. Informed of Stuart's intention, but fearing that he might be cut off, Jackson had informed him by messenger, that he would make a stand about a mile and a half in front of Martinsburg and wait for him; but Stuart joined him soon after he had posted Harper's regiment and a single gun, at Falli
ys. By 3 a. m. of the 26th his advance, under Whiting, moved from Ashland on the Ash-cake road; by 9 a. m. it was crossing the Virginia Central railroad, near Peake's, and by 10, Branch was informed of Jackson's progress, some six hours later than Lee had expected. Part of this delay was caused by the failure of the commissary department at Richmond to provide rations for Jackson at Ashland, as had been promised him. Jackson, in person, was pushing forward with all possible dispatch and, as White writes in his Life of Lee, with vigor unabated and his spirit aglow with the ardor of battle. Keeping to the left and pressing toward Cold Harbor, his right guarded by Stuart's horsemen, at 3 p. m. Hood's Texans in the lead had a hot skirmish at the Totopotomoy. There the Federals destroyed the bridge, which had to be rebuilt before Jackson could cross that stream; so he was unable to reach Hundley's corner, in McClellan's rear, until after dark of the 26th. Obeying orders and bearing to
had been destroyed to Hicksford. In December, Grant recalled the Sixth corps from the Shenandoah valley to his army, when Lee at once brought the Second corps, from the same region, to the trenches at Petersburg. Sheridan's big army of 56,000 men had neither cut the Virginia Central railway at Staunton, Charlottesville or Gordonsville, nor had it captured Lee's base of supplies at Lynchburg, having been held in the valley by Early, who had inflicted upon him a loss of 17,000. Dr. Henry Alexander White, in his every way admirable Life of Lee, says of the army of Northern Virginia, at this time: Winter poured down its snows and its sleet upon Lee's shelterless men in the trenches. Some of them burrowed into the earth. Most of them shivered over the feeble fires kept burning along the lines. Scanty and thin were the garments of these heroes. Most of them were clad in mere rags. Gaunt famine oppressed them every hour. One quarter of a pound of rancid bacon and a little mea
e surrender, Lee had, according to the reports of his ordnance officers, 7,892 organized infantry with arms, less than 2,100 effective cavalry, and but 63 pieces of artillery; a mere handful in contrast with the mighty host of 107,496 (reported as in Grant's command on the 10th of April) that surrounded him, and a portion of which his half-starved but ever heroic veterans, though few in number, were actually driving before them at the very moment he sent forward a flag of truce. Dr. Henry Alexander White describes the feelings of Lee's veterans who were present at this time (in his Life of R. E. Lee in The Heroes of the Nations series), in these words: Among the Confederate soldiers themselves there had been scarcely thought of surrender. When they saw their beloved leader riding back from the place of negotiations, their grief was well-nigh unspeakable. They halted his horse and gathered in clusters about him. Tears were running down every cheek as the grim, ragged veterans
nel; Poindexter, Parke, lieutenant-colonel; Poore, Robert H., major; Shelton, William D., major; White, William, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Wood, William W., major, lieutenantcol-onel. Fo O'Ferrall's battalion): Calmese, Fielding H., major; O'Ferrall, Charles T., lieutenant-colonel; White, Robert, colonel. Twenty-third Infantry battalion: Blessing, William, major; Cecil, William Pliam, lieutenant-colonel; Moore, Alfred C., colonel; Smith, Edwin R., major, lieutenant-colonel; White, Isaac, major. Thirtieth Cavalry regiment. (See Second Cavalry regiment.) Thirtieth battael. Thirty-fifth Cavalry battalion: Ferneyhough, George M., major; Myers, Franklin M., major; White, Elijah V., major, lieutenant-colonel. Thirty-fifth Infantry regiment. (No rolls or roster., H., lieutenantcol-onel. Forty-first Cavalry battalion (transferred to Twenty-third Cavalry): White, Robert, major, lieutenant-colonel. Forty-first Infantry regiment: Blow, George, Jr., lieuten
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
Gettysburg battle. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 5, 1899 ] Some literary facts connected Therewith. A question of great interest. Discussed in the Light of some late Revelations—General Early's Theory—Many writers passed in Review—a myth. By Henry Alexander White, Washington and Lee University. At what hour on the morning of July 2, 1863, did General Longstreet's troops present themselves, in readiness for battle, on the Seminary Ridge in front of Gettysburg? Strange to relate, it has required a period of thirty-three years to question, and yet this question bears upon the point that is most essential, perhaps, in the entire discussion of Longstreet's part in that great struggle. The chief facts in the case are as follows: So long as General R. E. Lee remained alive, no utterance in public fell from any Confederate officer's lips concerning the loss of the field of Gettysburg. On January 11, 1872, at the Washington and Lee University, General J. A. Ear<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
, has had issued a new edition of his school history of the United States, which is a great improvement on the first edition, and that he is now preparing an edition for use in High Schools and Colleges. We are also informed that the Rev. Henry Alexander White, D. D., of Washington and Lee University, has in press a history of the United States. Judging from Dr. White's Life of General Lee, we shall be disappointed if his book is not a good one. We hail the advent of these works by SoutherDr. White's Life of General Lee, we shall be disappointed if his book is not a good one. We hail the advent of these works by Southern authors with the greatest interest and pleasure, and we feel satisfied that they are the natural and logical outcome of the efforts made by these Confederate Camps to have the Truth taught to our children. As we said in our last report, so we repeat here: We ask for nothing more, and will be satisfied with nothing less. Fiat justicia ruat coelum. George L. Christian, Chairman. R. T. Barton, Carter R. Bishop, R. A. Brock, Rev. B. D. Tucker, John W. Daniel, James Mann, R. S. B. Smith, T. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
, has had issued a new edition of his school history of the United States, which is a great improvement on the first edition, and that he is now preparing an edition for use in High Schools and Colleges. We are also informed that the Rev. Henry Alexander White, D. D., of Washington and Lee University, has in press a history of the United States. Judging from Dr. White's Life of General Lee, we shall be disappointed if his book is not a good one. We hail the advent of these works by SoutherDr. White's Life of General Lee, we shall be disappointed if his book is not a good one. We hail the advent of these works by Southern authors with the greatest interest and pleasure, and we feel satisfied that they are the natural and logical outcome of the efforts made by these Confederate Camps to have the Truth taught to our children. As we said in our last report, so we repeat here: We ask for nothing more, and will be satisfied with nothing less. Fiat justicia ruat coelum. George L. Christian, Chairman. R. T. Barton, Carter R. Bishop, R. A. Brock, Rev. B. D. Tucker, John W. Daniel, James Mann, R. S. B. Smith, T. H