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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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tered into the soul of the whole detachment. Several of our boys were shot while trying to make their escape; others were more successful, among whom, I am happy to state, was our worthy Major, who immediately hastened to bring reenforcements from the detachment at Petersburgh. These last, led by Colonel Thoburn, arrived too late. Our detachment were already upon their way to Richmond. Among the many valuable officers lost to the service by this surprise, may be mentioned Captains Craig, White, and Reed; Lieutenants Hall, Helms, McKee, and Baird. Captains Daugherty and McElvoy and Lieutenant Apple have already made their escape, and returned safely to the camp at Petersburgh. I am happy to state many of the men have also made good their escape. Foot-sore and weary from their wanderings upon the dark and weary mountains, they are greatly rejoiced to arrive, even to the shelter and protection that an exposed camp can afford. The sutler of the regiment, D. J. Smith, Esq., of you
. But we had the pleasure of burning two vessels under her nose — the brig N. B. Nash, from New-York, and the whaling schooner Rienzi, from Provincetown; but the crew, however, had left when they saw us burn the brig. We showed the crew of the Nash the steamer Ericsson making tracks for New-York. With a sad heart we left the Ericsson and steered for Bermuda, at which place we arrived on the sixteenth instant, and as soon as we coal we leave this place for a cruise, and you and your readers may be assured that the Florida will sustain her reputation, and do all she; can to annoy the Yankees. Hoping this will meet your approbation, I close. Respectfully, etc. The following is a list of the deaths on board the Florida, since she commenced her cruise: Seaman John Johnson, liver complaint; seaman Isaac White, lost overboard; seaman John Lohman,consumption; Surgeon Grafton, drowned near the line; James Sudley, steward; Paymaster Lynch, died at sea, of hemorrhage of the lungs.
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Exploits of the C. S. Naval steamers. (search)
tured the ships Aldebaran, Oneida, Henrietta, Crown Point, Red Gauntlet, Sunrise, and the schooners V. H. Hill, Wm. B. Nash, and Hull. The last four were captured within 60 miles of New York. Independent of this, the expedition that left her in the Tacony, under Lieut. Reed, destroyed twenty-seven vessels on the New England coast. The deaths on the Florida since her last report are Paymaster Lynch, Surgeon Grafton, (who was drowned,) James Sudley, steward; John Johnson, John Lonman, and Isaac White. The Florida went to Bermuda to coal and to land sixty prisoners she had aboard. When she went into port on the official salutes were exchanged with the British authorities on shore. She has $125,000 in silver in the ship's chest. A letter from one of the officers of the ship gives an account of her chasing the U. S. steamer Ericsson, sent out after her, within sixty miles of New York harbor It says. We ran down until we saw the Yankee colors flying from her peak. "All hand" wer