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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
er of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
er of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First battle of Manassas. (search)
istant adjutant general I ever met. I have known him since 1861. Can do any thing he undertakes and do it better than any one else. In addition to these, the Baltimoreans, still living, who were under Captain Murray at First Manassas, are: Captains Clapham Murray, his brother, and McHenry Howard, General John Gill, Col. Frank Markoe Major Jas. Wm. Lyon, Judge Daniel G. Wright, Lieutenants Charles B. Wise, Charles E. Grogan, David S. Briscoe. Thomas B. Mackall and Winfield Peters; Privates, J. McKenny White, Sommervel Sollers and J. Southgate Lemmon. Rev. Randolph H. McKim. D. D., is in Washington, D. C.; Lieut. Richard T. Gilmor and Private Henry F. Schliephake are at the Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md.; Captain Frank X Ward and Private Fred'k L. Pitts, are in Philadelphia, Pa., and Private Duncan M. Turner is in Leonardtown, Md. These are probably the only survivors. A broken shaft of marble in the Confederate burial plot, in Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, to Murr