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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jack White or search for Jack White in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. Sabine Pass—Who will send us a detailed sketch of that heroic defence? An exchange, in announcing the recent death of Jack White, says: White was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of President Jefferson Davis, who designated these men as the forty bravest men of the Confederacy. The Federal force on that occasion consisted of three Federal brigades, commanded respectiveWhite was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of President Jefferson Davis, who designated these men as the forty bravest men of the Confederacy. The Federal force on that occasion consisted of three Federal brigades, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals W. H. Emory, Godfrey Weitzel, and F. S. Nicholson, all under the command of Major-General William B. Franklin, aggregating 6,000 Federal soldiers, and a fleet of gunboats. The defeat of this force was probably the most heroic exploit of the war, and out of solid shame the Federal Government dropped the record thereof from their war annals. Roster of the A. N. V: The following note should have had earlier publication, but was somehow overlooked. We warmly second th