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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jack White or search for Jack White in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
of the river (we are now in what is called Old River), and, as soon as passed, we headed for the middle of the stream, which gave Read his first opportunity—and right well did he use it. His rifles spoke to the purpose, for the enemy hauled down his colors. In an instant Captain Brown announced the fact from the deck, and ordered the firing to cease; but the ship still swinging, gave Wharton and the others a chance at her with the starboard guns before it was known that he had surrendered. White flags now appeared at her ports, and the news of our victory was known all over the ship in a moment. Talk about yelling and cheering; you should have heard it at the moment on the deck of the Arkansas to have appreciated it. In fifteen minutes, without being checked in our progress, we had thrashed three of the enemy's vessels—one carrying arms as good as ours and two more guns than we, and one of the others was a famous ram, whilst the third, though of but little account, gave moral su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
hed with steam power and having a good deal of machinery, was considered out of position after the fall of New Orleans, and was moved to Selma, Ala., where it grew into a large, well-ordered arsenal of the best class, under the charge of Lieutenant-Colonel White. It was relied on to a great extent for the equipment of the troops and fortifications in the southern part of the Confederacy. Attracted by the deposits of fine ore immediately north of Selma, made accessible by the Selma, Rome and ition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had after the war out of which to form an Ordnance Department, had we been successful! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the arsenals, armories and other places of manufacture of Ordnance stores. (search)
become equal to the execution of great enterprises involving high mechanical skill. The arsenal and workshops at Charleston were also enlarged, steam introduced, and good work done in various departments. The arsenal at Mount Vernon, now furnished with steam power and having a good deal of machinery, was considered out of position after the fall of New Orleans, and was moved to Selma, Ala., where it grew into a large, well-ordered arsenal of the best class, under the charge of Lieutenant-Colonel White. It was relied on to a great extent for the equipment of the troops and fortifications in the southern part of the Confederacy. Attracted by the deposits of fine ore immediately north of Selma, made accessible by the Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad, the War Department accepted the proposition of Mr. Colin McRae to undertake the erection at Selma of a large foundry for the casting of cannon of the heaviest calibre. A large contract was made with him and advances of money made f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Central laboratory. (search)
enant-Colonel Mallet, a chemist and scientist of distinction, who had for some years been professor in the University of Alabama, was selected and placed in charge of this delicate and important duty. I attribute much of the improvement in our ammunition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had after the war out of which to form an Ordnance Department, had we been successful! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., who would doubtless have returned to their civil avocations. Among the obvious necessities of a well-regulated service, was one large, central laboratory, where all ammunition should be made—thus securing absolute uniformity where uniformity was vi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
that we have gone into the blowing business we have only to call on our readers to bear us witness that we have not often indulged in that direction, and that the moral of it all is that we want more renewals and new subscribers. A most highly appreciated memento, in the shape of a cane-head made of wood taken from the house in which Stonewall Jackson was born, has been sent us (through Rev. Dr. A. E. Dickinson) by Mr. J. W. Odell, of Clarksburg, West Va. We return our hearty thanks. Jack White, one of the heroes of Sabine Pass, is not dead, as reported in the extract we published in the October number, but is living at Houston, Texas, hale and hearty, as one of our subscribers there, kindly informs us. By the way we have from a Federal officer who participated in the fight at Sabine Pass a very different version of it from the one we have published. We regret that this, as well as other very interesting articles, was crowded out of this number, but it shall duly appear, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sabine Pass. (search)
fferent version from the account of Sabine Pass which has been received among Confederates, and is very different from the one which follows it. We publish without comments:] Vicksburg, Miss., September 27th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—In the October issue of the Southern Historical Society papers you ask, Who will send us a detailed sketch of the heroic defence of Sabine Pass? and referring to the death of Jack White, quote from an unknown exchange the statement that White was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of Mr. Davis, &c. The statement further goes on to say that the Federal force consisted of three Federal brigades and a fleet of gun-boats, and adds, the defeat of this force was probably the most heroic exploit of the war, and out of solid shame the Federal Government dropped the record thereof from th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
Cavalry. from return of August 31st, 1863, and reports. Major-General Joseph Wheeler. Wharton's division. Brigadier-General John A. Wharton. First brigade. Colonel C. C. Crews. Seventh Alabama. Second Georgia. Third Georgia. Fourth Georgia, Colonel I. W. Avery. Second brigade. Colonel T. Harrison. Third Confederate, Colonel W. N. Estes. First Kentucky, Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Griffith. Fourth Tennessee, Colonel Paul F. Anderson. Eighth Texas. Eleventh Texas. White's (Georgia) Battery. Martin's division. Brigadier-General W. T. Martin. First brigade. Colonel J. T. Morgan. First Alabama. Third Alabama, Lieutenant-Colonel T. H. Mauldin. Fifty-First Alabama. Eighth Confederate. Second brigade. Colonel A. A. Russell. Fourth Alabama.( Two regiments of the same designation. Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson commanded that in Roddey's brigade.) First Confederate, Colonel W. B. Wade. Wiggins's (Arkansas) Battery. Roddey's brigade. Brig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
om this point the writer prefers to give the story in Lieutenant Whittle's own words: Having made all my preparations to destroy the ship, if necessary, to prevent her capture in passing out, I dropped down under the guns of Fort Macon. Colonel White, in command of the fort, came on board and told me of the efforts that were being made for my capture. He suggested that, as I had no means of defense, I should, on the approach of the expedition, destroy my vessel and come into his fort as a reinforcement to him. I then divulged to Colonel White my plan of escape and notified him of my intention to run out that evening, requesting him to see that I was not fired upon by his command. He was delighted with the plan and wished me God-speed. On the evening of March 17, 1862, between sunset and moonrise, the moon then being nearly full, I tripped my anchor and ran out. As soon as I was under way a rocket was sent up from the lower side of Bogue Island, below Fort Macon, by an enemy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations in front of Petersburg June 24th, 1864. (search)
. The gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Nelson is missing, it is hoped not killed. Captain Axson, Twenty-seventh regiment, was killed at the head of his company. Lieutenants Huguenin and Trim, of the Twenty-seventh; Lieutenants Chappell, Ford and Vauduford, Twenty-first, and Lieutenant Smith, Eleventh, were wounded. Captains Mulvaney and Buist were captured upon the enemy's works, the latter after receiving two wounds. A mistake. Captain Rayson and Lieutenant Riley, Eleventh regiment; Lieutenant White, Twenty-seventh regiment, and Lieutenant Clements, Twenty-first, are missing. I append a tabular list of casualties. Respectfully, Johnson Hagood, B. G. command.Commander.killed.wounded.missing.total. OfficersEnlisted Men.OfficersEnlisted Men.OfficersEnlisted Men.OfficersEnlisted Men.aggregate. Seventh Battalion S. C. V.Captain Jones111 Eleventh Regiment S. C. V.Captain Mickler1412724338487 Twenty-sixth Regiment S. C. V.Captain Wilds3418149 67076 Twenty-fifth Regiment S. C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
at either point. Notwithstanding this, although Burnside obtained possession of Hagans by noon on the 13th, before Walker had occupied Loudoun Heights, or McLaws had taken Maryland Heights, no attemp is recorded to have been made by either force to communicate by signal with the other during the half of the day so pregnant with fate for the garrison at Harpers Ferry. McClellan fired signal guns incessantly from the head of his relieving columns. They produced the impression upon Miles and White at Harpers Ferry of heavy cannonading, and a great battle somewhere, and scared them so badly that when the attack was really made upon them, they surrendered a strong position without striking a blow in its defence. Stuart held tenaciously to his ground until driven from position to position by infantry, and after midday of the 13th, he drew back to the pass in the South Mountain, where the National road passes over it. He found the pass occupied by D. H. Hill, and turned Hampton off to
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