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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 3 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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, 486, and hung, 503. Whiggism anti-abolition, 1.456, 519. Whipple, Charles [b. Uxbridge, Mass., Mar. 21, 1781; d. Newburyport, Mass., July 28, 1859], 1.305. Whipple, Charles King [b. Newburyport, Mass, Nov. 17, 1808], 2.326. Whitby, Daniel, Rev., 2.110. White, Adams, 1.391. White, Elipha, Rev., pro-slavery, 2.138, 163. White, Hugh Lawson [1773-1840], mail tampered with, 1.500; election opposed by Lib., 2.81. White, James C., Rev. [b. Lancaster, Mass., 1806], 1.221. White, Lydia, free-produce store, 1.264; attends Nat. A. S. Convention, 398. White, Nathaniel H., 1.80. White slaves, Northern, 1.134. Whiting, Nathaniel H., 2.293. Whitman, Benjamin, 2.28. Whitson, Thomas [b. July 2, 1796; d. Nov. 24, 1864], 1.398.—Portrait in Smedley's Hist. Underground R. R., p. 67. Whittier, Elizabeth Hussey [b. Dec. 7, 1815; d. Sept. 3, 1864], 2.12. Whittier, John Greenleaf [b. Haverhill, Mass., Dec. 17, 1807], poem printed by G., 1.66; discovered and encouraged
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
rican Anti-Slavery Society should be to encourage planters to cultivate their lands Lib. 1.121. by freemen, offering large premiums. He commended to the patronage of abolitionists the free groceries of Charles Collins, in New York, and of Lydia White, From a letter of Lydia White's of May 9, 1831 (partly printed in Lib. 1.87), it would appear that Mr. Garrison was desirous to clothe himself with free-labor fabrics. See, also, Lib. 1.93. Part of the severe plainness of fare of the partLydia White's of May 9, 1831 (partly printed in Lib. 1.87), it would appear that Mr. Garrison was desirous to clothe himself with free-labor fabrics. See, also, Lib. 1.93. Part of the severe plainness of fare of the partners while living in Merchants' Hall was due to a conscientious abstinence from coffee and sugar at least, as slave-labor products. in Lib. 1.173. Philadelphia, and allowed C. Peirce, of the latter city, to advertise that orders on his grocery would be gladly Lib. 1.88. received at the office of the Liberator, and the goods procured without extra charge. Logically there seemed no flaw in the argument based on the half-truth that slaves are kept because they are profitable; practically, M
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
Hall, Amos A. Phelps, John Rankin, A wealthy and liberal New York merchant, subsequently Treasurer of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Not to be confounded with the author of Rankin's letters (see Life of Arthur Tappan, p. 244). William Green, Jr., Abraham L. Cox, William Goodell, Elizur Wright, Jr., George Bourne, Charles W. Denison, Robert Purvis, and James Miller McKim. On the second day, too, a handful of women, all members of the Society of Friends—Lucretia Mott, Esther Moore, Lydia White, and Sidney Ann Lewis—were, on Thomas Whitson's invitation, in attendance, and, both by their presence and their share in the deliberations, made the occasion still more epochal. A more original, devoted, philanthropic and religious body was never convened, or for a more unselfish purpose, or amid greater public contempt and odium. Its sittings were, while guarded, open to its avowed and bitter enemies. No person was refused Lib. 3.203. admittance to the Convention: on the contrary,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
Minister; the Marquis de Sommariva, a Milanese and a kind of Maecenas of the arts now; and Mr. Benjamin Smith, son of the member from Norwich, who is here with his sister for his health. I always had a plate at their table, and generally met somebody that interested or instructed me: such as Sir William Cumming, a Scotchman of talent; the famous Azzelini, who was with Bonaparte in Egypt, and gave me once a curious account of the shooting the prisoners and poisoning the sick at Jaffa; Miss Lydia White, the fashionable blue-stocking; and many others of the same sort, so that the two or three days in the week I dined there were very pleasantly passed. On the 28th of February Mr. Ticknor left Naples and returned to Rome. To Elisha Ticknor. Rome, March 3, 1818. . . . . My visit at Naples, on which I was absent from this city just a month, was every way pleasant and interesting. The weather in particular — which is of great importance in a place like Naples, where almost every
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
presented to the rest of the Board of Examiners. The Board then went to a room by itself, and was called to order by Commodore Bainbridge, and General Houston, being the chief military personage on the ground, was chosen President; though for the rest, he is a pretty coarse Tennessean, who tries to be kind, good-natured, and even elegant. . . . . The other members are pleasant enough, particularly the three commodores, Bainbridge, Chauncey, and Jones, who are very agreeable indeed, and Colonel White of Florida, who proves an amiable, gentlemanlike man. We went forthwith to the examination, which was extremely thorough. Thirteen young men were under the screw four hours, on a single branch, and never less than four on the floor, either drawing on the blackboard or answering questions every moment, so that each one had above an hour's work to go through; and, as I said, in a single branch. It was the lowest section of the upper class, but no mistake was made, except by one Cadet.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
, 372-376; visits, 386. Whately, Archbishop, 412 and note, 413– 451. Wheaton, Henry, 494, 496, 499, 501. Wheelock, Dr., President of Dartmouth College, 5, 6. Wheelock, Mrs., 5. Whewell, William, 420, 421, 422. Whishart, Mr., 415. White, Colonel, 373. White, Miss, Lydia, 176. Whitney, inventor of the cotton-gin, 14. Wickham, Jr., 298. Wickham, William, 33. Wieck, Clara (Schumann), 474. Wiegel, 179. Wilberforce, William, 297. Wilde, Mr., 14. Wilkes, John, 55. Wilkes, MWhite, Miss, Lydia, 176. Whitney, inventor of the cotton-gin, 14. Wickham, Jr., 298. Wickham, William, 33. Wieck, Clara (Schumann), 474. Wiegel, 179. Wilberforce, William, 297. Wilde, Mr., 14. Wilkes, John, 55. Wilkes, Miss (Mrs. Jeffrey), 42. Wilkie, Sir, David, 421, 422, 425, 448. 449. William IV., King of England, 409. Williams, Friend, 337 note, 385. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, 130, 132, 135, 138. Williams, Samuel, 297 and note. Willis, Mr., of Caius College, 436. Wilmot, Mr., 411. Wilson, John, 278 and note. Winckelmann, J. J., 178. Winder, General, 29. Wirt, William, 33, 351. Woburn Abbey, 269, 270. Wolf, F. A., 105-107, 112, 114, 124. Woodbury, L., 381. Woodward, Mrs., 4, 7,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
and note, 413, 451. Wheaton, Henry, I. 494, 496, 499, 501. Wheelock, Dr., President of Dartmouth College, I. 5, 6. Wheelock, Mrs., I. 5. Whewell, William, I. 420, 421, 422, II. 152, 153, 156, 157, 176, 384. Whishart, Mr., I. 415. White, Colonel, I. 373. White, Miss, Lydia, I. 176. White Mountains, II. 226-228. Whitney, inventor of the cotton-gin, I. 14. Wickham, Jr., I. 298. Wickham, William, I. 33. Wieck, Clara (Schumann), I. 474. Wiegel, I. 179. Wiffen, Friend B. BWhite, Miss, Lydia, I. 176. White Mountains, II. 226-228. Whitney, inventor of the cotton-gin, I. 14. Wickham, Jr., I. 298. Wickham, William, I. 33. Wieck, Clara (Schumann), I. 474. Wiegel, I. 179. Wiffen, Friend B. B., letter to, II. 465. Wight, Isle of, visits, II. 376-378. Wilberforce, William, I. 297. Wilde, Mr., I. 14. Wilde (Q. C.), II. 363. Wilde, R. H., II. 54. Wilkes, John, I. 55. Wilkes, Miss (Mrs. Jeffrey), I. 42. Wilkie, Sir, David, I. 421, 422, 425, 448, 449. Wilkinson, II. 155. Wilkinson, Sir, Gardiner, II. 371. William IV., King of England, I. 409. Williams, Friend, I. 337 note, 385. Williams, General, Sir William, II. 372. Williams, Miss, Helen Maria, I. 130,