Your search returned 38 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
No imputation can be cast on Virginia in this matter. She did all that it was in her power to do to prevent the extension of Slavery, and to mitigate its evils so far as she could. was chosen to preside, and was conducted to the chair by ex-President James Madison and Chief Justice Marshall. The first earnest collision was on the White Basis, so called — that is, on the proposition that representation and political power should be apportioned to the several counties on the basis of their White population alone. The Committee on the Legislative department decided in favor of the White Basis by 13 to 11--James Madison's vote giving that side the majority; but he voted also against the White Basis for the Senate, making a tie on that point. A strong excitement having arisen on this question, General Robert B. Taylor, of Norfolk, an advocate of the White Basis, resigned, and his seat was filled by Hugh B. Grigsby, of opposite views. At length, November 16th. the Convention came
the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or may hereafter be presented to this House, praying for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia, and also the resolutions offered by an honorable member from Maine (Mr. Jarvis), with the amendment thereto, proposed by an honorable member from Virginia (Mr. Wise), and every other paper or proposition that
Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmons, Upham, White, Woodbridge--25. Yeas: From Free States, 13; Slave States, 14. Nays: From Free States, 12; Slave States, 13. and the proposition being returned to the House, the amendment of the Senate was concurred in by 134 Yeas to 77 Nays — a party vote: so the Annexation of Texas was decreed, in the following terms: Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled, That Congress doth consent that the territory properly included within, and rightfu
time became President of the Council in the first Territorial Legislature of Kansas--elected almost wholly by non-resident and fraudulent votes. Within the three months immediately preceding the passage of the Kansas bill aforesaid, treaties were quietly made at Washington with the Delawares, Otoes, Kickapoos, Kaskaskias, Shawnees, Sacs, Foxes, and other tribes, whereby the greater part of the soil of Kansas lying within one or two hundred miles of the Missouri border was suddenly opened to White appropriation and settlement. These simultaneous purchases of Indian lands by the Government, though little was known of them elsewhere, were thoroughly understood and appreciated by the Missourians of the Western border, who had for some time been organizing Blue lodges, Social bands, Sons of the South, and other societies, with intent to take possession of Kansas in behalf of Slavery. They were well assured, and they fully believed, that the object contemplated and desired, in lifting, b
e morning of August 30th, approached the little village of Osawatomie, which was defended by barely thirty Free-State men; but their leader was old John Brown. His son Frederick was shot dead, about a mile and a half from the village, by the Rev. Martin White, who led the pro-Slavery advance or scouting party, before young Brown was aware of their hostile character. Two other Free-State men were likewise surprised and killed early in the morning. John Brown, with his thirty compatriots, tomph, boasting that they had killed old Brown and dispersed his band; but their wagon-loads of dead and wounded created a salutary awe, which was very efficient in preventing future invasions, or rendering them comparatively infrequent. The Rev. Martin White, for his services in this expedition, was chosen a member of the next Lecompton (pro-Slavery) Legislature, which he attended; and, in the course of its deliberations, he entertained his fellow-members with a graphic and humorous account o
ed position on the north bank of the Gauley, just below the mouth of Meadow river. Rosecrans ordered a reconnoissance in force by Benham, which was somewhat too gallantly executed, resulting in a short, but severe action, wherein the advantage of position was so much on the side of the Confederates that their loss must have been considerably less than ours, which was about two hundred, including Col. Lowe, of the 12th Ohio, killed, and Col. Lytle, of the 10th, severely wounded, as was Lieut.-Col. White, of the 12th. Col. McCook's Ohio brigade (Germans) at one time received an order to storm the Rebel intrenchments, and welcomed it with a wild delight, which showed how gladly and thoroughly it would have been obeyed; but it was an order which Rosecrans had not given, and which, after a careful observation of the works, he countermanded. Instead of assaulting, he directed a more thorough reconnoissance to be made, and the troops to be so posted as to be ready for decisive work early i
amicomico, 600. Brown, Col. Harvey, at Fort Pickens, 601. Brown, David Paul, 126. Brown, Frederick, killed by Martin White, 284. Brown, Gov. Joseph E., of Ga., speech at Convention, 337; his Message, urging Secession, 347. Brown, John Eli, 53; early life, etc., 58-9; goes to Georgia, 60; invents the Cotton-Gin, 61; letter to Fulton, 65; his death. 66. White, J. W., letter from T. A. Andrews to, 367. White, Lieut.-Col., at Carnifex Ferry, 525. White, Major frank J., 591-2White, Lieut.-Col., at Carnifex Ferry, 525. White, Major frank J., 591-2. Whitfield, John W., 237; 240; 241; sacks and burns Osawatomie, 245. Whittier, John G., poem by, 630. Wigfall, Lewis T., of Texas, 373; 448. Wilcox, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Wild Cat, Ky., Rebels defeated at, 615-16. WilkesWhite, Major frank J., 591-2. Whitfield, John W., 237; 240; 241; sacks and burns Osawatomie, 245. Whittier, John G., poem by, 630. Wigfall, Lewis T., of Texas, 373; 448. Wilcox, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Wild Cat, Ky., Rebels defeated at, 615-16. Wilkes, Capt., seizes Mason and Slidell, 606-7. Wilkesbarre, Pa., fugitive-slave case at, 216. Williams, Euphemia, the case of, 216. Williams, Col. John S., at Piketon, Ky., 616. Wilmot, David, of Pa., 189; 319. Wilson, Senator, of Mass., 3
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Osawatomie by Rev. Martin White, August 30, 1856. An infant son, born August 7, 1832, was buried with his mother three days after his birth. By his second wife, Mary A. Day, to whom he was married at Meadville, Pennsylvania, (while he was living at Richmond, in Crawts, there seems something weird and forbidding in this utter blackness. On your left the giant wall now appears nearer — now retreats again; on your right foams the merry stream, breaking into graceful cascades — and across it the great mountain White—face, seamed with slides. Now the woods upon your left are displaced by the iron wall, almost touching the road-side; against its steep abruptness scarcely a shrub can cling, scarcely a fern flutter; it takes your breath away; but five miles of <
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
y recovered from his once dangerous malady. Jason Brown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick Brown, (1st,) January 9, 1827, Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Osawatomie by Rev. Martin White, August 30, 1856. An infant son, born August 7, 1832, was buried with his mother three days after his birth. By his second wife, Mary A. Day, to whom he was married at Meadville, Pennsylvania, (while he was living at Richmond, in Crawford County,) he had thirteen children: Sarah Brown, born May 11, 1834, at Richmond, Pennsylvania; died, September 23, 1843. Watson Brown, October 7, 1835, Franklin, Ohio; married Isabella M. Thompson, September, 1856;--wounded at Harper's
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
t comes nearer and nearer, and close beside, upon your left, are glimpses of a wall, black and bare as iron, rising sheer for four hundred feet above your head. Coming from the soft marble country of Vermont, and from the pale granite of Massachusetts, there seems something weird and forbidding in this utter blackness. On your left the giant wall now appears nearer — now retreats again; on your right foams the merry stream, breaking into graceful cascades — and across it the great mountain White—face, seamed with slides. Now the woods upon your left are displaced by the iron wall, almost touching the road-side; against its steep abruptness scarcely a shrub can cling, scarcely a fern flutter; it takes your breath away; but five miles of perilous driving conduct you through it; and beyond this stern passway, this cave of iron, lie the lovely lakes and mountains of the Adirondack, and the homestead of John Brown. The homestead and its ornaments. The Notch seems beyond the world,<
1 2