Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Martin White or search for Martin White in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Osawatomie by Rev. Martin White, August 30, 1856. An infant son, born August 7, 1832, was buried with his mother three days after his birth. By his second wife, Mary A. Day, to whom he was married at Meadville, Pennsylvania, (while he was living at Richmond, in Crawts, there seems something weird and forbidding in this utter blackness. On your left the giant wall now appears nearer — now retreats again; on your right foams the merry stream, breaking into graceful cascades — and across it the great mountain White—face, seamed with slides. Now the woods upon your left are displaced by the iron wall, almost touching the road-side; against its steep abruptness scarcely a shrub can cling, scarcely a fern flutter; it takes your breath away; but five miles of <
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
y recovered from his once dangerous malady. Jason Brown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick Brown, (1st,) January 9, 1827, Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Osawatomie by Rev. Martin White, August 30, 1856. An infant son, born August 7, 1832, was buried with his mother three days after his birth. By his second wife, Mary A. Day, to whom he was married at Meadville, Pennsylvania, (while he was living at Richmond, in Crawford County,) he had thirteen children: Sarah Brown, born May 11, 1834, at Richmond, Pennsylvania; died, September 23, 1843. Watson Brown, October 7, 1835, Franklin, Ohio; married Isabella M. Thompson, September, 1856;--wounded at Harper's
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
t comes nearer and nearer, and close beside, upon your left, are glimpses of a wall, black and bare as iron, rising sheer for four hundred feet above your head. Coming from the soft marble country of Vermont, and from the pale granite of Massachusetts, there seems something weird and forbidding in this utter blackness. On your left the giant wall now appears nearer — now retreats again; on your right foams the merry stream, breaking into graceful cascades — and across it the great mountain White—face, seamed with slides. Now the woods upon your left are displaced by the iron wall, almost touching the road-side; against its steep abruptness scarcely a shrub can cling, scarcely a fern flutter; it takes your breath away; but five miles of perilous driving conduct you through it; and beyond this stern passway, this cave of iron, lie the lovely lakes and mountains of the Adirondack, and the homestead of John Brown. The homestead and its ornaments. The Notch seems beyond the world,<
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: battle of Ossawatomie. (search)
souri, wrote an account of the recent murder of a person whom he called Poor Martin White, a Free State preacher of the Gospel. It served its purpose — for it was orshed in a Republican paper and widely copied; when — as had been arranged — Martin White re-appeared, denied the story of his death, and ridiculed the Republicans fory papers, whenever an outrage was recorded, would sneeringly allude to Poor Martin White. For his services in furthering this stratagem, and as a reward for the murder of Frederick Brown, Poor Martin White was elected a member of the Territorial Legislature which assembled at Lecompton. During the course of the session he gaveacher, calmly, I was acting as a part of the law and order militia. Poor Martin White, when the session was finished, proceeded to his home. But he never reachedrpse was found stiff and cold on the prairie — with a rifle ball in it. Poor Martin White! Brown's address to his men. They are coming — men, make ready; See th