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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
rston; 6th Ark.,----; 7th Ark., Col. D. A. Gillespie; 8th Ark., Col. John H. Kelly; Miss. Battery (Swett's). Brigade loss: k, w, and m, 71. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. P. R. Cleburne (w): 13th Ark.,----; 15th Ark.,----; 2d Tenn.,----; Ark. Battery (Calvert's). Brigade loss (not separately reported). Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson: 5th Confederate, Col. J. A. Smith; 17th Tenn., Col. A. S. Marks; 23d Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Keeble; 25th Tenn., Col. John M. Hughs; 37th Tenn., Col. Moses White; 44th Tenn., Col. John S. Fulton; Miss. Battery (Jefferson Art'y), Capt. Put. Darden. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 165; m, 9=204. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. A. M. Wood (w): 16th Ala.,----; 33d Ala.,----; 3d Confederate,----; 45th Miss.,----; 15th Battalion Miss. Sharp-shooters,----; Ala. Battery, Capt. Henry C. Semple. Brigade loss (not separately reported). cavalry Brigade, Col. Joseph Wheeler: 1st Ala., Col. William W. Alien; 3d Ala., Col. James Hagan; 6th Confederate, Lieut.-Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Citizens of Gettysburg in the Union army. (search)
in command of the post, we were marched out on the Chambersburg pike at 10 A. M., June 26th, for a distance of about three and a half miles, accompanied by Major Robert Bell, who commanded a troop of horse, also raised, I understand, in Gettysburg. Having halted, our colonel, accompanied by Major Bell, rode to the brow of an elevation distant several hundred yards, and there saw General Early's troops a few miles distant. Early says in his report: I sent General Gordon with his brigade and White's battalion of cavalry on the pike through Cashtown toward Gettysburg, and moved with the rest of the command to the left through Hilltown to Mummasburg. The object of this movement was for Gordon to amuse and skirmish with the enemy while I should get on his flank and rear so as to capture his whole force. We, a few hundred men at the most, were in the toils; what should be done? We would gladly have marched to join the Army of the Potomac, under Meade, but where was it? Our colonel, le
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
n; 5th Ark., Lieut.-Col. John E. Murray; 6th and 7th Ark., Col. S. G. Smith (w), Lieut.-Col. F. J. Cameron (w), Maj. W. F. Douglass; 8th Ark., Col. John H. Kelly (w), Lieut.-Col. G. F. Baucum; Miss. Battery (Swett's), Lieut. H. Shannon. Brigade loss: k, 86; w, 503; m, 18 = 607. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson: 17th Tenn., Col. A. S. Marks (w), Lieut.-Col. W. W. Floyd; 23d Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Keeble; 25 Tenn., Col. J. M. Hughs (w), Lieut.-Col. Samuel Davis; 37th Tenn., Col. Moses White (w), Maj. J. T. McReynolds (k), Capt. C. G. Jarnagin; 44th Tenn., Col. John S. Fulton; Miss. Battery (Jefferson Art'y), Capt. Put. Darden. Brigade loss: k, 61; w, 488; m, 57 = 606. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. A. M. Wood: 16th Ala., Col. W. B. Wood (w); 33d Ala., Col. Samuel Adams; 3d Confederate, Maj. J. F. Cameron; 45th Miss., Lieut.-Col. R. Charlton; 15th Miss. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Capt. A. T. Hawkins; Ala. Battery, Capt. Henry C. Semple. Brigade loss: k, 52; w, 339; m, 113 =
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
avis's (Ala.) Battery; Lumsden's (Ala.) Battery; Massenburg's (Ga.) Battery. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 6 == 8. cavalry, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Wheeler. Wharton's division, Brig.-Gen. John A. Wharton. First Brigade, Col. C. C. Crews: 7th Ala.,----; 2d Ga.,----; 3d Ga.,----; 4th Ga., Col. Isaac W. Avery. Second Brigade, Col. Thomas Harrison: 3d Confederate, Col. W. N. Estes; 1st Ky., Lieut.-Col. J. W. Griffith; 4th Tenn., Col. Paul F. Anderson; 8th Texas,----; 11th Texas,----; Ga. Battery (White's). Martin's division, Brig.-Gen. William T. Martin. First Brigade, Col. J. T. Morgan; 1st Ala.,----; 3d Ala., Lieut.-Col. T. H. Mauldin; 51st Ala.,----; 8th Confederate,----. Second Brigade, Col. A. A. Russell: 4th Ala., Two regiments of the same designation. Lieut.-Col. Johnson commanded that in Roddey's brigade.----; 1st Confederate, Col. W. B. Wade; Ark. Battery (Wiggins's). Roddey's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. P. D. Roddey; 4th Ala., Two regiments of the same designation. Lieut.-Col
nlisted Men. Headquarters 20th Corps,1     1 1st Division, 2217 88109 2d Division, 8258 46114 3d Division, 117 2837 Artillery,   1124 Total,1115831164265 B. headquarters Twentieth corps, Provost-marshal's office, Savannah, Georgia, January 4, 1865. Lieutenant-Colonel H. W. Perkins, Assistant Adjutant-General: Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of prisoners of war, captured during the late campaign from November fifteenth to December twenty-first, 1864: Moses White, Colonel, Thirty-seventh Tennessee infantry: J. H. W. Clinch, Colonel, Aid General Hardee; George P. Harrison, Colonel, militia; Thomas F. Wells, Lieutenant-Colonel, Georgia militia; A. D. Taylor, Captain, Post Quartermaster, Eatonton, Georgia; Charles W. Baldwin, Captain, Cobb's Georgia Legion; S. McCombs, Captain, Brigade Commissary of Subsistence, Cook's brigade, Ewell's corps; J. R. Respass, Captain, commanding militia company; Benjamin Milliken, Captain, First Georgia Reserves
tInfantryCol. E. E. TansillMay 8, 1862.  Col. W. M. Bradford   32dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. E. C. Cook   33dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. W. P. JonesMay 8, 1862.  Col. A. W. Campbell   34thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Jas. E. McMurray Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. W. M. Churchwell   35thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. B. J. HillSept. 6, 1861.Promoted Brigadier-General. 36thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Alexander K. Alley   Col. R. J. Morgan   37thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Moses White   38thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Jno. C. CarterMay 10, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. R. F. Looney   39thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. W. M. Bradford   Col. Alpheus Baker   40thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. L. M. Walker Promoted Brigadier-General. 41stTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Robt. FarquhasonNov. 27, 1861.  42dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. W. A. Quarles Promoted Brigadier-General. 43dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. W. Gillespie   44thTenness
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1849. (search)
1849. Everett Peabody. Colonel 13th (afterwards 25th) Missouri Vols. (Infantry), September 1, 1861; killed at Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 6, 1862. the Rev. William B. O. Peabody, D. D., of Springfield, Massachusetts, was the son of Judge Oliver Peabody of Exeter, New Hampshire, and was born July 7, 1799. He married Eliza Amelia White, daughter of Major Moses White, who served in the army through the Revolution. Rev. Dr. Peabody was settled in Springfield, Massachusetts, in October, 1820, and remained with the same parish until his death, which took place in 1847. He was well known as a preacher, essayist, naturalist, and poet, and was universally respected for the pure and elevated character of his daily life. Those who remember the Springfield of forty years ago speak of Mrs. Peabody as lovely in person and manners, full of energy and public spirit, and taking a leading part in all schemes for doing good. Their eldest son, Howard, died in infancy. The rest o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1853. (search)
1853. Wilder Dwight. Major 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 24, 1861; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 13, 1862; died September 19, 1862, of wounds received at Antietam, September 17. Wilder Dwight, second son of William and Elizabeth Amelia (White) Dwight, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on the 23d of April, 1833. His paternal ancestor was John Dwight of Oxfordshire, England, who settled in Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1636. His mother was descended from William White of Norfolk County, England, who settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1635. His family has belonged to New England for more than two centuries, and during that whole period has been identified with its history, its industry, its enterprises, and its institutions. In childhood he gave promise of all that he afterwards became,—manly, courageous, self-possessed, acute, original, frank, affectionate, generous, reliable;—he was, in boyhood, not less than in manhood, one in whom to place an absolute trust. Yet
g comprised the divisions of Patton Anderson and S. B. Buckner. Tennessee was represented in Col. Samuel Powell's brigade of Anderson's division, by Powell's regiment, the Twenty-ninth; by the Second in Cleburne's brigade of Buckner's division; and in the same division by the Tennessee brigade of Bushrod R. Johnson, comprising the Fifth Confederate, Col. J. A. Smith; Seventeenth, Col. A. S. Marks; Twenty-third, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Keeble; Twenty-fifth, Col. John M. Hughs; Twenty-seventh, Col. Moses White; Forty-fourth, Col. John S. Fulton. The Fourth cavalry was with Wharton. Skirmishing began at 10 a. m. of the 8th, and soon Liddell's brigade, of Buckner's division, was hotly engaged, but was withdrawn to our main line. Cheatham was moved from left to right, with Wharton's cavalry on his right, to meet a movement of the enemy. General Bragg now (at 1 o'clock) ordered the advance of his whole command. Wharton charged the left of the enemy with great fury, rushing over stone walls
h, Col. B. J. Hill; Fifth (Confederate), Col. J. A. Smith, constituted a part of the brigade under Gen. Lucius E. Polk, Cleburne's division. The brigade of Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson, Cleburne's division, included the Thirty-seventh Tennessee, Col. Moses White; Forty-fourth, Col. John S. Fulton; Twenty-fifth, Col. John M. Hughs; Seventeenth, Col. A. S. Marks; Twenty-third, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Keeble. The First Tennessee cavalry, Col. James E. Carter, and the Tennessee battalions of Maj. DeWitt C.ove back its support, and took the guns, but the gallant colonel fell, maimed for life. Cleburne mentioned him as one of the best officers in the division. Others wounded in Johnson's brigade were Maj. H. C. Ewing, Forty-seventh, mortally; Col. Moses White and Lieut.-Col. R. D. Frayser, Thirty-seventh, and Col. J. M. Hughs, Twenty-fifth. Bushrod Johnson's brigade and Liddell's were already the chief sufferers. The latter, now in advance, was reinforced by Johnson in double-quick time, and
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