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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 36 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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ote far away from the scenes they spoke of-comfortably housed and perfectly secure. The men of the North wrote with their pens, while the men of the South wrote with their hearts! A singular commentary upon this has been given us by Mr. Richard Grant White-himself a member of the committee. In April, 1861, a committee of thirteen New Yorkers-comprising such names as Julian Verplanck, Moses Grinnell, John A. Dix and Geo. Wm. Curtis-offered a reward of five hundred dollars for a National Hyn out by the application of a greenback poultice! The committee advertised generally for five hundred dollars' worth of pure patriotism, to be ground out in not less than sixteen lines, nor more than forty. Even with this highest incentive, Mr. White tells us that dozens of barrelfuls of manuscript were rejected; and not one patriot was found whose principles — as expressed in his poetry — were worth that much money! Were it not the least bit saddening, the contemplation of this attempt to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seward, William Henry 1801-1872 (search)
871. He had been everywhere received with marks of high consideration. His recorded observations were edited by his adopted daughter, and published. Mr. Seward's Works (4 vols.), contained his speeches in legislative debates, eulogies in the Senate of several of his colleagues, occasional addresses, orations, etc. He died in Auburn, N. Y., Oct. 10, 1872. A character appreciation. The following review of the development of the career of the great American foreign secretary, by Richard Grant White, reveals the personality of the statesman in a clear and discriminating light: It is much to be regretted that Mr. Seward's eminently noble and useful life was ended before he had finished the Autobiography which, at the request of his family, he had begun. For, from what he had written of it before his death, and from the revelations of his letters written to his family and his nearest personal friends, we may infer with certainty that he would have dealt frankly with the world
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
y-fifth administration—Democratic, March 4, 1885, to March 3, 1889. Grover Cleveland, New York, President. Thomas A. Hendricks, Indiana, Vice-President. Proclamation of President warning persons against attempting to settle on Oklahoma lands......March 13, 1885 United States government determines to guarantee free and uninterrupted transit across the isthmus of Panama, now threatened by insurgents......April 2, 1885 Special session of Senate adjourns......April 2, 1885 Richard Grant White, Shakespearian critic and philologist, born 1822, dies at New York City......April 8, 1885 Five hundred United States troops enter Panama, arrest Aizpuru, leader of insurgents, and protect American property......April 24, 1885 Revised version of the Old Testament published in London and New York......May 15, 1885 Apache Indian outbreak under Geronimo in New Mexico and Arizona......May 17, 1885 F. T. Frelinghuysen, ex-Secretary of State, born 1817, dies at Newark, N. J....
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
rated at Newburg......Oct. 18, 1883 New railroad (cantilever) bridge across the Niagara below the falls opened......Dec. 20, 1883 New York State dairy commission established by law......April 24, 1884 Governor Cleveland nominated for President of the United States at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago......July 8, 1884 Grover Cleveland resigns as governor Jan. 6, 1885, having been elected President of the United States, David B. Hill acting governor......1885 Richard Grant White, born 1822, dies at New York City......April 8, 1885 Common schools cost the State $13,466,367.97......1885 Legislature authorizes the governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint three forest commissioners......May 15, 1885 Niagara Falls reservation made a State park......July 16, 1885 Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, born 1822, dies at Mount McGregor, near Saratoga......July 23, 1885 David B. Hill, Democrat, elected governor......November, 1885 Commission
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, Richard Grant 1822-1885 (search)
White, Richard Grant 1822-1885 Journalist; born in New York City, May 22, 1822; graduated at the University of the City of New York in 1839; studied both law and medicine, and was admitted to the bar in 1845. He soon afterwards devoted himself entirely to newspaper and literary work, and especially to the study of languages. He was a frequent contributor to the Galaxy and the Atlantic Monthly; and wrote National hymns, a Lyrical and National study for the times; The American view of the copyright question; Poetry of the Civil War, etc. He died in New York City, Aug. 8, 1885.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, V. The swing of the social pendulum. (search)
for our young people; but it is something to know that it is only a temporary swing of the pendulum after all. It must be remembered that Anglomania is confined among us to a limited class, and to certain very limited pursuits and interests of that class. It does not exist, for instance, among our men of science, inasmuch as they go to Germany in shoals for study, and rarely visit England since the death of Darwin. It is not now charged upon our literary men, since the death of Richard Grant White, who was, moreover, as ardently anti-English in some directions as he was vehemently English in others. It is not found in our journalism, which aspires to lead the English, and actually leads it in enterprise, while falling behind it in evenness of execution and in the minor proprieties of life. It is not to be found in our public-school system or in our college systems, for these, where they are not American, are German. It is not found in our library methods, for in the libraria
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, Index. (search)
1,175. victory of the weak, the, 296. Virtue of man and woman the same, 3. visiting the sick, on, 227. voices, 166. Voices, American and English, 167. Voltaire, F. M. A., 87. W. Wales, Prince of, 23. Ward, Artemus, described, 43. Warner, C. D., quoted, 217. Washington, George, 296. Wasted, the fear of its being, 232. Watson, E. H., 183. Watson, George, 183. weak, victory of the, 296. Wellesley College, 100. Wellington, the Duke of, quoted, 196. White, R. G., 24. Whittier, J. G., quoted, 54, 117. Also 98,106, 153, 308. who shall fix the value? 202. Whole duty of man, the, 4. why women authors write under the names of men, 259. Wife, position of, in Rome, 45. Will, breaking of, in children, 1°1. Willis, N. P., 289. Winlock, Anna, 287. Wolcott, Mrs., Oliver, 98. Wollstonecraft, Mary. See Godwin. woman of influence, the, 17. woman's enterprise, A, 207. Women, advantages of, 29; as household decorators, 161; as orga
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
ely appreciation of his favourite authors. The essays have no reforms to propose. They are the summing up of many hours spent in his library and his class-room. The influence of the college makes itself felt in various ways. Agassiz in science and Child in letters were among Lowell's colleagues, and his years as a professor had given him both an opportunity for wide reading and an acquaintance with the sterner exactions of scholarship. In some cases, as in the careful review of Richard Grant White's edition of Shakespeare, the criticism is precise and textual. In all cases the reflections about the great masters formed through years of intimacy have undergone the seasoning discipline of a broad and adequate scholarship. Lowell did not write on a subject unless he knew a good deal about it, nor did he fail to avail himself of the best that scholarship had accumulated; and such habits have not been matters of course among literary critics. Not only Lowell's thoroughness and ac
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
probably this collection that formed the basis of the selections from Southern poetry published as an appendix to Richard Grant White's Poetry, lyrical, narrative, and satirical of the Civil War (1866). In his preface White says: I have read alWhite says: I have read all that I could discover of the war poetry, written by the confederated enemies of my government, and have preserved here all that, in a most catholic spirit, I deemed of any intrinsic merit or incidental interest. It was my original purpose to embored Banner was published in a New York newspaper, The Freeman's journal. Omitting the humorous poems published by Moore, White has only the ten or twelve of a more serious and important nature, and these, in the main, not the ones that might be cono say of poems that do not relate to the war. In 1882 Francis F. Browne of Chicago carried out the purpose that Richard Grant White had expressed by publishing Bugle echoes—a collection of poems of the Civil War, Northern and Southern. Drawing u
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
hly review, the, 169 Western review and miscellaneous magazine, the, 169 Westminster review, the, 137, 140 West Point, 156 What was it?, 373, 374 Wheaton, Henry, 71, 78 Wheeler, Joseph, 291 When evening Cometh on, 331 When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloomed, 286 When this Cruel War is over, 285, 309 Whewell, Wm., 221 Whistling Dick's Christmas Stocking, 393-394 Whitcher, Frances Miriam, 154 White, Gilbert, 201 White, Maria (Mrs. J. R. Lowell), 246 White, Richard Grant, 253, 299, 303 White, William, 206 White Heron, a, 383 Whitman, George, 269, 271 Whitman, Jeff, 263 Whitman, Walter, Sr., 259 Whitman, Walt, 218, 245, 258-274, 276, 277, 284, 286, 303 Whitman, Sarah Helen, 60, 61 Whitney, Mrs. A. D. T., 398 Whittier, John, 45 Whittier, John Greenleaf, 42-54, 165, 167, 173, 174, 228, 230, 241, 245, 249, 276, 277, 279, 281, 283, 312, 353, 362, 401 Whittier, Joseph, 42 Whittier, Mary, 44 Whittier, Thomas, 42 Who's ready?, 28
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