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Doc. 182.-Second Tennessee Regiment. The following are the commanding officers: Colonel, Wm. B. Bate; Lieut.-Col., Goodall, Major, Doak; Quartermaster, M. W. Cluskey; Surgeon, Dr. Kennedy; Assistant Surgeon, Dr. Erskine. The following are the company officers: A, Capt. Stephen White; B, Capt. Anderson; C, Capt. Chaney; D, Capt. Henry Rutherford; E, Capt.,Hunt; F, Capt. T. D. White; G, Capt. Erthman; H, Capt. Dennison; I, Capt. Tyre; J, Capt. Humphrey Bate. The Carolina Grays (Capt. Hunt) is the flag company of the regiment. The regiment is called the Walker legion, in compliment to the Secretary of State of the Southern Confederacy. The Colonel is from Gallatin county, is a distinguished lawyer, and a man of undoubted ability; besides, he has acquired fame on the bloody fields of Mexico. The Lieutenant-Colonel (of Sumner county) was one of the first to scale the walls of Monterey at the siege of that place by the Americans. Major Doak is also an old Mexican volunteer, an
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opinion of this meeting, that the Congr<
resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opinion of this meeting, that the Congr<
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
vice, from first to last, at 180,000, of whom 29,298 died: the largest military African force we have any knowledge of in history, ever mustered into the service of any government, and the proportion of loss being very much larger than among our White troops, of which only one in ten died in the service, while of the Black troops, the loss was nearly one to six. This does not look like a record of cowardice, or incapacity. It is believed that, take their record all through, it was unsurpasanity:— These were some of the fresh aspects which began to be seen wherever the Colored people were found; and it gave good ground for encouragement to assist them. A new responsibility was rolled upon the whole rank and file of the body of White society. Even those who had been the least hopeful, not to say the most provokingly prophetic of evil omen, found themselves insensibly participating in the general feeling of sympathy and respect. And so the five millions of Americans of Afric
vice, from first to last, at 180,000, of whom 29,298 died: the largest military African force we have any knowledge of in history, ever mustered into the service of any government, and the proportion of loss being very much larger than among our White troops, of which only one in ten died in the service, while of the Black troops, the loss was nearly one to six. This does not look like a record of cowardice, or incapacity. It is believed that, take their record all through, it was unsurpasanity:— These were some of the fresh aspects which began to be seen wherever the Colored people were found; and it gave good ground for encouragement to assist them. A new responsibility was rolled upon the whole rank and file of the body of White society. Even those who had been the least hopeful, not to say the most provokingly prophetic of evil omen, found themselves insensibly participating in the general feeling of sympathy and respect. And so the five millions of Americans of Afric
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section tenth: downfall of the Rebellion. (search)
37th Congress recognized the independence of those republics by authorizing the President to establish diplomatic relations with them. By the provisions of law, White male citizens alone were enrolled in the militia. In the Amendment to the acts for calling out the militia, the 37th Congress provided for the enrolment and drafting of citizens, without regard to color; and, by the Enrolment Act, Colored persons, free or slave, are enrolled and drafted the same as White men. The 38th Congress enacted that Colored soldiers shall have the same pay, clothing, and rations, and be placed in all respects upon the same footing, as White soldiers. To encourage enWhite soldiers. To encourage enlistments, and to aid emancipation, the 38th Congress decreed that every slave mustered into the military service shall be free forever; thus enabling every slave fit for military service to secure personal freedom. By the provisions of the fugitive-slave acts, slave hunters could hunt their absconding bondmen, require the peopl
37th Congress recognized the independence of those republics by authorizing the President to establish diplomatic relations with them. By the provisions of law, White male citizens alone were enrolled in the militia. In the Amendment to the acts for calling out the militia, the 37th Congress provided for the enrolment and drafting of citizens, without regard to color; and, by the Enrolment Act, Colored persons, free or slave, are enrolled and drafted the same as White men. The 38th Congress enacted that Colored soldiers shall have the same pay, clothing, and rations, and be placed in all respects upon the same footing, as White soldiers. To encourage enWhite soldiers. To encourage enlistments, and to aid emancipation, the 38th Congress decreed that every slave mustered into the military service shall be free forever; thus enabling every slave fit for military service to secure personal freedom. By the provisions of the fugitive-slave acts, slave hunters could hunt their absconding bondmen, require the peopl
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Agents wanted for the wonders of the world; comprising startling Incidents, interesting scenes, and Wonderfl events in all countries, all ages, and among all people. (search)
ling Incidents, interesting scenes, and Wonderfl events in all countries, all ages, and among all people. C. G. Rosen Berg. Over one thousand illustrations, By the most distinguished Artists in Europe and America. The list of contributors numbering one hundred and twenty-eight, among whom are found the popular and widely-known names of Gustave Dore, Berghaus, Billings, Cruikshank, Corbould, Eytinge, Fenn, Gilbert, Gavarni, Hennessy, Homer, Milais, Nehleig, Nast, Read, Horace Vernet, White, Weir, Waud, Miss Edwards, Tony Johannot, etc., etc. The Largest, most Beautiful, and Cheapest Pictorial Work ever issued. A novelty in literature, and the most splendid book enterprise of the age. A progressive book for progressive people, at a nominal price. Indispensable to every man, woman, and child in the land. It contains over one thousand magnificent engravings, with accompanying reading matter on every conceivable subject of popular interest, embracing Science, History, Biog
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
ng of Wednesday, Sept. 16, at the age of thirty-five. He was buried the next day with the respect due to his memory. His funeral was attended by the Vice-President (John Adams), the Secretary of War (Henry Knox), and the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Massachusetts. The first Congress under the Constitution was then in session in New York. His pall was upheld by eight officers of the late army: General Webb, and Colonels Bauman, Walker, Hamilton, Willet, Platt, Smith, and White. The hearse was preceded by a regiment of artillery and the Society of the Cincinnati. New York Journal and Weekly Register, Sept. 16, 1789: Gazette of the United States, Sept. 19, 1789; Massachusetts Centinel, Sept. 26, 1789 The tombstone of Major Sumner is in the centre of St. Paul's Churchyard, on Broadway. It is by the side of that of Major John Lucas of the Georgia line, who died the month preceding. Both stones,—lying horizontally, with hardly any space between them, and the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
iff speech, which was begun at Faneuil Hall, Oct. 30, and concluded the next (Sunday) evening at Quincy Hall. A few days later, Sumner went to Salem, as Browne's guest, and attended the trial of Joseph J. Knapp, as accessory to the murder of Stephen White. He heard Mr. Webster's closing argument for the government. It was in this address, which according to the newspapers of the day ended with a peroration of surpassing pathos, that Mr. Webster, alluding to the suggestion that the jury shoul78-385. Rev. Dr. Emery, a classmate of Sumner, writes:— Immediately after graduating, I opened a private school in Beverly; and, while residing in that town, the great trial of Knapp, as an accomplice of Crowninshield in the murder of Mr. White, took place in Salem. Mr. Franklin Dexter and Mr. W. H. Gardiner were Knapp's counsel, and Webster was on the side of the State. The trial attracted many from the neighboring towns,—law-students and young lawyers. Among them Sumner was prese
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