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Farquhar, a citizen of this place, entered their lines some distance from town, and obtained permission to inform the citizens of York of their approach, on the condition that he should return to their command and inform them whether or not our forces would make any resistance to the occupation of this place. A meeting of the Safety Committee was called, and it was then determined, on account of the strong force of the enemy, to make no resistance, and Chief Burgess Small and George Hay, Thomas White and W. Latimer Small, members of the committee, accompanied by Mr. Farquhar, went out to meet the advance, to inform them of the decision of the committee, and ask the protection of the private property and unarmed citizens. They met General Gordon, of Early's division, and informed him that, having no sufficient force to resist their advance, they were authorized to ask that no injury be done the citizens in their persons or private property. General Gordon heard their request, and a
was allowed to each brigade headquarters, one to each regimental battery, one to the New-York cavalry, and two to the Pennsylvania cavalry. A proper allowance of ambulances — so read the orders — were allowed to each column. Scarcely had the head of the first column begun to move on the outskirts of the encampment when General Keyes and staff rode from Headquarters toward the front. The General's staff on the occasion was composed of the following officers: Medical Director Mulford, Major White-head, Major Jackson, Captain Howard, and Captain Rice. Though the kindness of Captain Howard, I was mounted on a captured secesh horse, which kept me well up with the staff during the march and the many inspections personally made by the General during the two days of our operations. The usual line and order of march were observed during the expedition. In this order the expedition took up the march for Baltimore Cross-Roads — the first designated halting-place on the route to Bott<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
n, estimates Lee's forces at Sharpsburg (Antietam) at 33,000 men, including the three arms of service. According to Thomas White, Chief Clerk in the Adjutant-General's Office at Lee's headquarters, General Lee had 33,000 infantry at Sharpsburg, orese two brigades to Longstreet's 1800, we have 4000 as the number opposed to Hooker. According to the estimate of Mr. Thomas White, chief clerk of the adjutant-general's office at General Lee's headquarters, who had charge of the field returns dur-fifth, 5944, for noneffectives,--total available Union force, 23,778. Total available Confederate force, according to Mr. White, 15,000; according to Colonel Taylor, 9900, plus the two reserve brigades of Longstreet, whose strength he does not giv the heat and burden of the day,--Meade, Hatch, Cox, Willcox, Scammon, Crook, Gibbon, Ewing, Gallagher, Magilton, Phelps, White, Jackson, Callis, Bragg, and others. In regard to the casualties of the opposing forces, the losses in killed and woun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
effort to rally the men. General McLaws moved Wilcox's brigade of R. H. Anderson's, and later Kershaw's and Barksdale's brigades of his own division, to the support of Cobb, but not in time to take part in the engagement. The report of General McLaws shows that he accurately appreciated the effect of our success in completely shutting up his command on Maryland Heights until the surrender of Harper's Ferry opened the door for him, to cross into Virginia. Accepting the estimate of Mr. Thomas White, who was chief clerk in the adjutant-general's office at General Lee's headquarters, and had charge of the returns, the whole available force under McLaws was 8000 men, and mine, on the basis of the last returns, 12,300. Couch's division (7219 men) of the Fourth Corps did not reach the field of the 14th until the fighting was over, and was detached from my command early the next morning. But these figures are at least one-fifth, if not one-fourth, beyond the actual effective strength.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
. Battery, Capt. J. F. Hart; Va. Battery, Capt. M. W. Henry; Va. Battery, Capt. M. N. Moorman. Artillery loss: k, 3; w, 22 == 25. Total Confederate loss: killed, 608; wounded, 4116; captured or missing, 653 == 5377. The present for duty in Lee's army (including all of Stuart's cavalry), as shown by his return for December 10th, was 78,513. To arrive at Lee's effective strength in the battle (not officially stated) there should be deducted the usual proportion of non-combatants, the detachment of Hampton's cavalry brigade, on a raid to the north of the Rappahannock, and the cavalry brigade of W. E. Jones serving in the Shenandoah Valley. According to the estimate of Mr. Thomas White, as given in Taylor's Four years with General Lee (p. 158), this was 58,500 of all arms. Colonel Taylor (p. 81) says: Less than 20,000 Confederate troops (about one-fourth of the army under General Lee) were actively engaged.--editors. Union camp scene.--a quiet game. From a War-time sketch.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Brig.-Gen. William B. Hazen. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Giles A. Smith, Col. James S. Martin, Col. Theodore Jones: 55th Ill., Joined from veteran furlough June 16th. Lieut.-Col. Theodore C. Chandler, Capt. Jacob M. Augustin, Capt. Francis H. Shaw, Capt. Cyrus M. Browne; 111th Ill., Transferred to Second Brigade August 4th. Col. James S. Martin, Maj. William M. Mabry, Col. J. S. Martin; 116th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Anderson Froman, Capt. Thomas White, Capt. John S. Windsor; 127th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Frank S. Curtiss, Capt. Alexander C. Little, Lieut.-Col. F. S. Curtiss,Capt. Charles Schryver; 6th Mo., Lieut.-Col. Delos Van Deusen; 8th Mo., Four companies relieved for muster-out June :16th, and five companies June 25th, Company K remaining. Lieut.-Col. David C. Coleman, Capt. Hugh Neill, Capt. John W. White; 57th Ohio, Col. Americus V. Rice, Lieut.-Col. Samuel R. Mott. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Col. Wells S. Jo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
y, the Charleston riflemen, the Meagher Guard of Irishmen, and the German riflemen. More than a column of the Mercury of December 21, now before the writer, was filled with these notices and devices. A few of the latter are given on this and the next page, as mementoes of the time. The Washington Light Infantry was an old company, and bore the Eutaw flag of the Revolution. The Charleston riflemen was an old company, organized in 1806. The insignia of the Marion Artillery was a copy of White's picture of Marion dining the British officer. That of the Meagher Guard appears to have been made for the occasion — a rude wood-cut, with the words Independence or Death. The title of this company was given in honor of the Irish exile, Thomas F. Meagher, whose honorable course, in serving his adopted country gallantly as a brigadier-general during the civil war that followed, was a fitting rebuke to these unworthy sons of Ireland, who had fled from oppression, and were now ready to fight
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
jamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, Thomas J. Stryker. Pennsylvania.--James Pollock, William H. Meredith, David Wilmot, A. W. Loomis, Thomas E. Franklin, William McKennan, Thomas White. Delaware.--George B. Rodney, Daniel M. Bates, Henry Ridgley, John W. Houston, William Cannon. Maryland.--John F. Dent, Reverdy Johnson, John W. Crisfield, Augustus W. Bradford, William T. Goldsborough, J. Dixon Roman, Benjamin C. HowardMaine, Lott M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield: Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Caleb B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Tennessee, F
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
tuous men of the South. Trencher soldiers, who enlisted to war upon their rations, not on men. They are such as marched through Baltimore [the Massachusetts Sixth, admirably clothed, equipped, and disciplined, and composed of some of the best young men of New England], squalid, wretched, ragged, and half-naked, as the newspapers of that city report them. Fellows who do not know the breech of a musket from its muzzle, and had rather filch a handkerchief than fight an enemy in manly combat. White slaves, peddling wretches, small-change knaves and vagrants, the dregs and offscourings of the populace; these are the levied forces whom Lincoln suddenly arrays as candidates for the honor of being slaughtered by gentlemen — such as Mobile sends to battle. Let them come South, and we will put our negroes to the dirty work of killing them. But they will not come South. Not a wretch of them will live on this side of the border longer than it will take us to reach the ground and drive them
nt of existing difficulties between States; with authority to report what they may deem right, necessary, and proper, to restore harmony and preserve the Union; and that they report on or before Friday. This Committee was composed as follows: Maine, Lot M. Morrill; New Hampshire, Asa Fowler; Vermont, Hiland Hall; Massachusetts, Francis B. Crowninshield; Rhode Island, Samuel Ames; Connecticut, Roger S. Baldwin; New York, David Dudley Field; New Jersey, Peter D. Vroom; Pennsylvania, Thomas White; Ohio, Thomas Ewing; Indiana, Charles B. Smith; Illinois, Stephen F. Logan; Iowa, James Harlan; Delaware, Daniel M. Bates; North Carolina, Thomas Ruffin; Virginia, James A. Seddon; Kentucky, James Guthrie; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; Tennessee, F. K. Zollicoffer; Missouri, A. W. Doniphan. Mr. Guthrie, from the majority of said Committee, on the 15th, made a report, recommending several amendments to be ingrafted on the Federal Constitution; which amendments, as perfected and voted on b
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