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Ministers in the field. --We are pleased to learn that Rev. Thomas Ward White, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Lunenburg, Va., has tendered his ministerial services gratuitously to the Howitzer Company during the continuance of the war. Mr. White is known to most of our citizens as the son of the late Philip B. White, of the firm of Massie & White. He came to the city, we understand, to unite with this company as a common soldier, but was dissuaded from it by his friends on account of the field. --We are pleased to learn that Rev. Thomas Ward White, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Lunenburg, Va., has tendered his ministerial services gratuitously to the Howitzer Company during the continuance of the war. Mr. White is known to most of our citizens as the son of the late Philip B. White, of the firm of Massie & White. He came to the city, we understand, to unite with this company as a common soldier, but was dissuaded from it by his friends on account of his health.
Manassas Junction correspondent. --Rev. Thos. Ward White, Chaplain, of the Howitzers, is our correspondent from this place, and therefore our intelligence may be considered perfectly reliable.
among the first to rush in defence of our devoted Commonwealth. The Liberty Hall Volunteers, a company composed of the students of Washington College, left here on Saturday last. Prudence demands silence with regard to their destination. Suffice it to say that they are a noble set of fellows, possessed of that high moral courage so characteristic of our well-educated youth. Their departure presented quite an affecting scene. After the presentation of a handsome flag by the ladies, the Rev. Dr. White, Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, uttered a fervent prayer, invoking the blessings of the Most High upon those who were about to sacrifice everything for the liberties of their country. While applauding the noble spirit which actuates the people of this time-honored country, let us not forget the ladies, who manifest such heroism as would have done credit to the wives and daughters of ancient Sparta. To them is due the honor of making the first cartridges made in Virginia. For mor
[Communicated.]Howitzer Library. Feeling the urgent need of suitable reading matter to fill up the leisure moments of our soldiery, the object of this note is earnestly to solicit at the hands of all who feel an interest in our battalion the presentation of such books as they can conveniently spare, in order that we may form an attractive library. Such works as "Hedley Vicars," the "Life of Gen. Havelock," "English Hearts and English Hands," and books of that character, would be peculiarly acceptable. We would also suggest, as belonging to a different class, the works of Washington Irving, Fennimore Cooper, and Walter Scott. They can be left at Messrs. J. Woodhouse & Co.'s, Richmond, with the name of the giver written in each volume. Thos. Ward White, Chaplain. June 18th, 1861.
Steamer Logan. --This steamer is doing most efficient service on York River. On a recent visit to West Point, we accidentally fell in with the commander, Captain White, and found him qualified in every respect for the duties of his position. It was with difficulty that we resisted the temptation of taking a trip with him; but what was then an impossibility may yet, under more favorable circumstances, be our privilege. None of us can over-estimate the importance of the service which the Logan is performing at the present time.
fering from chronic diseases. I would suggest that persons sending delicacies and other things for these different hospitals, should always be particular to enclose in such packages the names of the kind givers, and the article presented. When they are intended for the general hospital, let them be marked to Dr. Hines; when for any one of the different regiments, let them be addressed distinctly to the regiment. We however think, as a general thing, it would be the best to direct all packages to Dr. Hines, marking distinctly on them the different regiments for which they are intended, when such is the case. The Dr. informs me that he is in want of experienced professional nurses, who are willing to enter the hospital and abide entirely by his instructions. Thomas Ward White, Chaplain of the Howitzer's Battalion. N. B.--Papers throughout this and other States feeling an interest in the welfare of our soldiers, will please be kind enough to insert the above.
The ship Golden Rocket was the one that was taken by the privateer, and after being ransacked and burned, her officers and crew were landed at Cienfuegos. She was commanded by Captain French, was 608 tons burthen, and was rated as A 1½. She was built at Brewer, Maine, in 1858, and belonged to Messrs. E. S. Dole & Co., Bangor. At the time of her capture she was on her way from Havana to Cienfuegos. The bark Louisa Kilham was bound to Falmouth from Cienfuegos, and was commanded by Capt. White. She is 463 tons burthen, is rated A 2, and is owned in Boston by C. R. Kilham & Co. She was built in 1851 at Bath, Maine. The bark West Wind, commanded by Capt. Bolger, was also bound to Falmouth from Cienfuegos. She was built at Westerly, Rhode Island, in 1853, and was owned by Greenman & Son, of the same place. She is rated as A 2, and is 429 tons burthen. The brig Cuba was commanded by Captain Strout, was built in Millbridge in 1851, and is owned by J. M. Sawyer, of the s
Rev. T. Ward White. We learn that Rev. Thos. Ward White, Chaplain of the Howitzer Battalion, has resigned his position and accepted the Captaincy of a volunteer company in Lunenburg. Rev. T. Ward White. We learn that Rev. Thos. Ward White, Chaplain of the Howitzer Battalion, has resigned his position and accepted the Captaincy of a volunteer company in Lunenburg.
"Mannisela." New's Ferry, Aug. 11, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch:--I was much gratified a few weeks since reading in your paper a paragraph taken, I think, from a tract published by Rev. Dr. White, of the Baptist church, giving the interpretation of the word Ba given in the 28th chapter, 16th verse of Genesis--"Surely the Lord is in this place and I knew it not." I have been some what surprised that no allusion has been made in any of the papers to the meaning of Manasseh. as found in the 41st chapter, verse of Genesis--"For God hath made me forget my toil and all my father's house." I learn from yesterday's Enquirer that the Gap was originally celled Man a Gap, and that the junction of the two reads has taken the name of the Gap. But it is now generally spelled Manassas.--evidently a corruption of Manasach's, which I would much prefer calling it on account of its scriptural meaning.
[for the Richmond Dispatch]the Lunenburg Cadets and other things of interest. Lunenburg C. H. Aug. 19, 1861. Notwithstanding our county has already furnished its quota of volunteers, the interest in war matters has by no means abated. There is still a large number of brave young men who have not yet entered the service. I am happy to inform you that Rev. Thomas Ward White, formerly Chaplain of the Howitzer Battalion, has accepted the Captaincy of the "Lunenburg Cadets," and is now in our midst busily engaged in enlisting recruits from sixteen to twenty years of age. He proposes carrying his men into camp at Bethany Church on the first Monday of September. Mr. While is one of the most popular gentlemen in our county, and we have no doubt he will easily succeed in getting up a company of seventy five or eighty young men, who will cheerfully follow their gallant leader even into the jaws of death. We have also in our midst another firm advocate of Southern-Rights in the p
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