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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. S. White or search for W. S. White in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
neral Lee hesitated. He modestly distrusted his own competency to fulfill the trust, and he feared that the hostility of the government towards him might direct adverse influences against the Institution which it was proposed to commit to his care. These considerations being successfully combatted by those who knew how high his qualifications were, and how great were his attractions, General Lee accepted the position tendered him, and on the 20th of October, 1865, he appeared before the Rev. W. S. White— the oldest Christian minister of Lexington—took the oath of office, and assumed the duties of President of Washington College. On the eve of acceptance, two propositions were made to General Lee: one to become President of a large corporation, with a salary of $10,000 per annum; another to take the like office in another corporation, with a salary of $50,000. But he had made up his mind to come here, and this is what he said to a friend who brought him the last munificent offer:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. (search)
Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. By W. S. White, Third Company Richmond Howitzers. Fall of Richmond. 'Twas the Sabbath morning on the 2d of April, 1865, and all was quiet along our lines. My battalion had been relieved from the front and was stationed a mile or so back in the rear of our main lines, on the north side of the James River. At the usual hour for divine services quite a goodly collection of men had assembled in the Third Howitzers and a feeling discourse was preached to them by our chaplain, Rev. Henry M. White, than whom there is no chaplain more popular in our army. How quiet and peaceful everything seemed, and yet, farther on, away off to the right, across the James River, scenes were transpiring that would shake from center to circumference our now hopeless Confederacy. Little did the pastor or the people think then that it was the last sermon to the First Virginia Artillery! The calm peacefulness of that Sabbath morning meeting, hanging as it w