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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
Washington, the day Lee was at Chambersburg and Ewell at Carlisle. This officer has been unjustly criticised for not being in front of Lee's army at Gettysburg, but Lee and Longstreet must be held responsible for his route. Lee crossed the Potomac west of the Blue Ridge, Hooker east of it, and Stuart between him and Washington. General Lee continued to march his columns over the river into Maryland and Pennsylvania. Ewell, the first of the invaders, with Jenkins's cavalry brigade and White's battalion under its fine commander, was in advance. His march was directed by Hagerstown to Chambersburg, Pa., and Carlisle, where he arrived on June 27th with two of his divisions. His remaining division, under Early, was sent to York to break the railroad between Harrisburg, Pa., and Baltimore, and seize the bridge over the Susquehanna at Wrightsville. Longstreet and Hill encamped near Chambersburg the day Ewell reached Carlisle. Lee was spreading over Northern territory in order to
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
that, it would have prevented me from holding any of the ground I subsequently held to the last. Lee to the strong courage of the man united the loving heart of the woman. His nature was too epicene, said an English critic, to be purely a military man. He had a reluctance to oppose the wishes of others, or to order them to do anything that would be disagreeable and to which they would not consent. Had I Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg, I would have won a great victory, he said to Professor White, of the Washington and Lee University, after the war, because he knew it would have been sufficient for Jackson to have known his general views without transmitting positive orders, and that Stonewall, quick and impatient, would have been driving in the enemy's flank ere the rays of the morning sun lifted the mists from the Round Tops. If Lee had issued by his chief of staff his battle order for the 2d in writing, as is customary, Longstreet would have carried it out probably in good f
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
e between the two, great pillars of fire rose draped in the smoke of a burning city. The tattered, brown, weather-beaten army is marching away through woods and over roads with straggling trains; the faces of the soldiers are turned from Richmond. The victorious legions, glistening with steel, with clashing music and waving banners, are pouring into the city, marching through the streets, and stacking arms in the Public Square, where stood the dumb walls of the Capitol of the Confederacy. White clouds of dense smoke with the light of the fire woven in their folds, reaching from the island-dotted river to the tall trees on the hill of the Public Square, hung in the sky above the fated city. At the same time Grant rode into Petersburg between rows of closed houses and deserted streets, cheered here and there by a few groups of negroes, until he came to a comfortable-looking brick house with a yard in front, where he dismounted and with his staff took seats on the piazza. There
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 16: return to Richmond.-President of Washington College.--death and Burial. (search)
from Powhatan County in four days, his simple entree was made into the little mountain town of Lexington. As he drew rein in front of the village hotel, an old soldier recognized him, gave the military salute, placed one hand upon the bridle, the other upon the stirrup, and stood, waiting for him to dismount. The general's wish for a quiet, informal inauguration was gratified, and on October 2, 1865, in the presence of the faculty, students, and board of trustees, subscribed before William White, Esq., justice of the peace, the oath I do swear that I will, to the best of my skill and judgment, faith-fully and truly discharge the duties required of me by an act for incor-porating the Rector and Trustees of Liberty Hall Academy, without favor, affection, or partiality. prescribed by law. During the ceremony the general, dressed in a plain but elegant suit of gray, remained standing, his arms folded, calmly and steadfastly looking into the eyes of the speaker, Judge Brockenbrou
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
l, commands Eighteenth Corps, 365. Western armies, success of, 347. Westmoreland County, 146. Westover estate, Virginia, 164. West Point graduates, 24. Whisky Insurrection, 10. White House, 164, 167. White Oak Swamp, 153, 162. White, Professor, 281. White, William, of Lexington, 406. Whiting, General W. H. C., 155. Whittier, Colonel, of Humphreys's staff, 391. Wickham family, the, 305. Wigfall, Senator, of Texas, 332. Wilcox's brigade at Gettysburg, 279-297. WilderWhite, William, of Lexington, 406. Whiting, General W. H. C., 155. Whittier, Colonel, of Humphreys's staff, 391. Wickham family, the, 305. Wigfall, Senator, of Texas, 332. Wilcox's brigade at Gettysburg, 279-297. Wilderness, battles of the, 329. Wilderness tavern, 247, 329. William and Mary College, 33. William the Conqueror, 2, 141, 278. Williams, General, Seth, 262, 389, 390. Windsor Forest estate, 18. Windsor, General, Charles, 180. Wirtz, Captain, trial of, 407. Wise, General Henry A., 76, xno, 113, 117, 118, 119, 123, 347. Withers, John, 150. Wolsey, Cardinal, mentioned, 65. Wool, General John E., 34, 35. Worth, General William J., 400. Wright, General H. G., succeeds Sedgwick
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
Va., Col. W. D. Stuart, Lieut.-Col. P. P. Slaughter. Kemper's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. L. Kemper, Col. Joseph Mayo, Jr.; 1st Va., Col. Lewis B. Williams, Lieut.-Col. F. G. Skinner; 3d Va., Col. Joseph Mayo, Jr., Lieut.-Col. A. D. Callcote; 7th Va., Col. W. T. Patton, Lieut.-Col. C. C. Flowerree; 11th Va., Maj. Kirkwood Otey; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. A. Armistead, Col. W. R. Aylett; 9th Va., Maj. John C. Owens; 14th Va., Col. James G. Hodges, Lieut.-Col. William White; 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds, Lieut.-Col. P. B. Whittle; 53d Va., Col. W. R. Aylett; 57th Va., Col. John Bowie Magruder. Artillery, Maj. James Dearing; Fauquier (Va.) Art., Capt. R. M. Stribling; Hampden (Va.) Art., Capt. W. H. Caskie; Richmond Fayette Art., Capt. M. C. Macon; Virginia Batt., Capt. Joseph G. Blount. Hood's division, Maj.-Gen. John B. Hood, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law:-- Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. M. Law, Col. James L. Sheffield; 4th Ala., Lieut.-Col. L. H. Scruggs;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
. Garnett (k), Maj. Charles S. Peyton: 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton (w); 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. H. A. Carrington (w); 19th Va., Col. Henry Gantt (w), Lieut.-Col. John T. Ellis (k); 28th Va., Col. R. C. Allen (k), Lieut.-Col. William Watts; 56th Va., Col. W. D. Stuart (m w), Lieut.-Col. P. P. Slaughter. Brigade loss: k, 78; w, 324; m, 539 =941. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead (k), Col. W. R. Aylett: 9th Va., Maj. John C. Owens (k); 14th Va., Col. James G. Hodges (k), Lieut.-Col. William White; 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds (k), Lieut.-Col. P. B. Whittle; 53d Va., Col. W. R. Aylett (w); 57th Va., Col. John Bowie Magruder (k). Brigade loss: k, 88; w, 460; m, 643 = 1191. Kemper's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James L. Kemper (w and c), Col. Joseph Mayo, Jr. (w): 1st Va., Col. Lewis B. Williams (w), Lieut.-Col. F. G. Skinner; 3d Va., Col. Joseph Mayo, Jr., Lieut.-Col. A. D. Callcote (k); 7th Va., Col. W. T. Patton (k), Lieut.-Col. C. C. Flowerree; 11th Va., Maj. Kirkwood Otey (w); 24t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
lines, Gen. G. T. Beauregard. Major-General George E. Pickett commanded at Petersburg. Ransom's division, Maj.-Gen. Robert Ransom, Jr. Gracie's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Archibald Gracie, Jr.: 41st Ala.,----; 43d Ala.,----; 59th Ala.,----; 60th Ala.,----. Kemper's Brigade, Col. William R. Terry: 1st Va., Maj. George F. Norton; 3d Va.,----; 7th Va., Capt. W. O. Fry; 11th Va.,----; 24th Va.,----. Barton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Seth M. Barton: 9th Va., Col. James J. Phillips; 14th Va., Col. William White; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Cabell; 53d Va., Col. William R. Aylett; 57th Va., Col. C. R. Fontaine. Hoke's (old) Brigade, Lieut.-Col. William G. Lewis: 6th N. C.,----; 21st N. C.,----; 54th N. C.,----; 67th N. C.,----; 1st N. C. Batt'n,----. Artillery Battalion, Lieut.-Col. C. E. Lightfoot: Va. Battery, Capt. J. D. Hankins; Va. Battery, Capt. J. H. Rives; Va. Battery, Capt. T. R. Thornton. Hoke's division, Maj.-Gen. Robert F. Hoke. Corse's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Montgomery D. Corse
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ate Army. some of the regimental and battery commanders mentioned were not in actual command on December 31st. General Robert E. Lee. Provost Guard, etc.: 1st Va. Batt'n, Maj. D. ]:. Bridgford; 39th Va. Batt'n Cav., Maj. John H. Richardson. Engineer Troops: 1st Reg't, Col. T. M. R. Talcott. first Army Corps, Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett. Steuart's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George H. Steuart: 9th Va., Col. J. J. Phillips; 14th Va., Col. William White; 38th Va., Col. George K. Griggs; 53d Va., Col. W. R. Aylett; 57th Va., Col. C. R. Fontaine. Corse's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Montgomery D. Corse: 15th Va., Col. T. P. August; 17th Va., Col. Arthur Herbert; 29th Va.,Col. James Giles; 30th Va., Col. R. S. Chew; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague. Hunton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton: 8th Va., Col. N. Berkeley; 18th Va., Col. H. A. Carrington; 19th Va., Col. Henry Gantt; 28th Va., Col. William Watts; 56th Va., Col. William E. Green. Terry's Bri
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ter's Mates, J. H. Manning, J. L. Rowe and C. E. Everdean; Engineers: First-Assistant, James Sheriden; Third-Assistants, James A. Chasmer, E. D. Weems, Geo. Paul and L. T. Safford; Acting-Gunner, John Brown. Steamer Mahaska. Commander, J. B. Creighton; Lieutenant, E. C. V. Blake; Assistant Surgeon, H. S. Pitkin; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Chas. Fairchild; Acting-Master, Benj. Dyer; Acting-Ensigns, Frederick Elliott, N. W. Black, Chas. G. Boyer and G. E. French; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. White; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, G. E. Ashby; Third-Assistants, Thomas La Blanc, E. L. Hewett and N. H. Lamdin. Steamer Cimmaron. Commander, Aaron K. Hughes; Lieutenant, Adolphus Dexter; Assistant Surgeon, E. S. Olcott; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Griffin; Acting-Master, S. A. Waterbury; Acting-Ensigns, W. H. Anderson, G. F. Howes, Chas. Renfield, J. W. North and T. R. Dayton; Acting-Master's Mates, Thomas Newton, P. J. Markoe, J. D. Reed and E. P. Crocker; Engineers: Second
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