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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Blackwood (center) and medical officers in 1864 first division, ninth corps, army of the Potomac Surgeons. During the war forty surgeons were killed and seventy-three wounded while attending to their duties on the battlefield. Without the excitement of actually taking part in the fight, with no hope of high promotion, seeking no approval but that of their own consciences, these men performed their task actuated and sustained by no other impulse than the sense of duty. William James Hamilton White, of the District of Columbia, became assistant-surgeon in the regular Army March 12, 1850. He was appointed major-surgeon April 16, 1862, and met his fate five months later on the battlefield of Antietam. On this same day E. H. R. Revere, assistant-surgeon of the Twentieth Massachusetts Infantry, was killed on the battlefield. Other surgeons became ill from the excessive labor which they conscientiously and skilfully performed. Surgeon-General Hammond, accompanied by Brigadier
Blackwood (center) and medical officers in 1864 first division, ninth corps, army of the Potomac Surgeons. During the war forty surgeons were killed and seventy-three wounded while attending to their duties on the battlefield. Without the excitement of actually taking part in the fight, with no hope of high promotion, seeking no approval but that of their own consciences, these men performed their task actuated and sustained by no other impulse than the sense of duty. William James Hamilton White, of the District of Columbia, became assistant-surgeon in the regular Army March 12, 1850. He was appointed major-surgeon April 16, 1862, and met his fate five months later on the battlefield of Antietam. On this same day E. H. R. Revere, assistant-surgeon of the Twentieth Massachusetts Infantry, was killed on the battlefield. Other surgeons became ill from the excessive labor which they conscientiously and skilfully performed. Surgeon-General Hammond, accompanied by Brigadier