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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. B. White or search for D. B. White in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
7, aggregate 7, effective 6. Eleventh Connecticut—Officers 15, men 390; officers 26, men 412; officers 15, men 390; commanding, Major Charles Warren. Thirteenth New Hampshire—Officers 9, men 227; officers 13, men 247; officers 13, men 247; officers 13, men 220; commanding, Major L. S. Studley. Nineteenth Wisconsin—Officers 11, men 369; officers 15, men 388; officers 13, men 310. Eighty-first New York—Officers 10, men 81; officers 11, men 83; officers 6, men 71; commanding, Major D. B. White. Ninety-eighth New York—Officers 15, men 236; officers 17, men 268; officers 13, men 210; commanding, Lieutenant-Colonel W. Kreutzer. One Hundred and Thirty-ninth New York-Officers 12, men 294; officers 16, men 309; officers 12, men 278; commanding, Major Theodore Miller. Convalescent detachment from the 2d and 3d divisions which had gone over to the extreme left to reinforce Sheridan. Officers 12, men 532; officers 14, men 546; officers 12, men 471. Total—Officers
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Fredericksburg artillery, Captain Edward S. Marye, [from the times-dispatch, January 8, 1905.] (search)
The Fredericksburg artillery, Captain Edward S. Marye, [from the times-dispatch, January 8, 1905.] In the three days battle at Fredericksburg, July, 1863. First appearance of the Confederate States flag with White field. Deaths of Lieutenants Morris and Eustace. By C. R. Fleet (now of Lynchburg, Va.); Edited by U. S. Senator J. W. Daniel. On the morning of July I, 1863, the Fredericksburg Artillery, Captain Edward S. Marye commanding (better known as Braxton's Battery, from its first captain), marched with the advance brigades of Heth's division (Archer's and Davis's brigades) from Cashtown, taking the turnpike toward Gettysburg. About 9 o'clock we struck a small body of cavalry. The two brigades formed line of battle, and two of our guns were unlimbered in front of a brick building which looked like an old Virginia county courthouse tavern. We opened fire on the squad of cavalry, scattering them immediately. This was the first artillery fire in the battle of Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The ironclad ram Virginia-Confederate States Navy, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, April 1, 1904.] (search)
hen the Virginia steamed over from Norfolk to engage the Federal fleet, her officers were: Flag officer, Franklin Buchanan; executive, Lieutenant Catesby A. R. Jones; lieutenants, Charles C. Simms, R. D. Minor, Hunter Davidson, J. Taylor Wood, J. R. Eggleston and Walter Butt; midshipmen, Fonte, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long and Roote; paymaster, James Semple; surgeon, Dinwiddie B. Phillips; assistant surgeon, Algernon S. Garnett; captain of marines, Reuben Thom; engineers, H. A. Ramsey; acting chief, Tynan, Campbell, Hening, Jack and White; boatswain, Hasker; gunner, Oliver; carpenter, Lindsey; clerk, Arthur Sinclair, Jr.; volunteer aid, Lieutenant Douglas F. Forrest; Confederate States army, Captain Kevill, commanding detachment of Norfolk United Artillery; signal corps, Sergeant Tabb. [Our impression is that this list is incomplete; that Dr. Bennett Wood Green served on the Virginia as assistant surgeon, and the late Virginius Newton of Richmond, as midshipman.—editor.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
d Barksdale's Brigades back to Crampton's pass, some six miles distant, to hold him in check. Arriving in front of the pass, we formed line across the valley and awaited events. The Federal infantry was in plain view on the side of the mountains, their guns stacked in line of battle, and Barksdale's men were there to meet them. Signal guns were fired by the enemy to give information to the garrison that they were approaching, but Jackson was not the man to parley in such an exigency. General White surrendered the entire force of 11,000 men, seventy-three pieces of artillery, 20,000 stands of small arms and a large quantity of military stores early in the day of September 15. The news was communicated by signal flag, and General Barksdale galloped along the front of the brigade and announced to each regiment: Harper's Ferry has surrendered. It is unnecessary to state that the Mississippians yelled. That was a part of their daily exercise which never failed to give the enemy the