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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for P. W. White or search for P. W. White in all documents.

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embered: the road, the camps, the church at the Tract, the burned bridge — all would call forth some remark; for then every thing was fresh and novel, and we had not become hardened. We came through the Mill Creek Valley — a good, loyal neighborhood, and the homes of Captain Ault's Swamp Rangers. We now felt that we were among friends; and from here to New-Creek there is a large proportion of Union men. We arrived at Petersburgh, and enjoyed a two days rest. This morning McNeil and White, with three hundred guerrillas, attacked a train of ninety wagons, which were on the way from New-Creek to Petersburgh. They killed two of the guards, wounded five, pillaged seven wagons and burned five, and captured two hundred horses. It was a bold, daring act; but the train was some two miles in length, and a guard of only seventy-five men to protect it. As soon as the General got the news, he sent the Third Virginia in pursuit, if possible to overtake them; but the rebels had six hours
liams, Smith, and Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-fourth; Brown, of the Sixth, with a few others, plunged into the river and swam safely over; but, unfortunately, some others were drowned. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Jones, Jr., of the Fifty-seventh, and Captain White, of the Sixth, plunged in to swim, but the coldness of the water compelled them to put back. The casualties of our brigade are small in killed and wounded. Adjutant Mebane, of the Sixth, wounded in arm and side; William Johnston, Captain Captain White's company, wounded in thigh severely, though not mortally; Sergeant Crisman, Captain Hooper's company, killed. The brigade is almost annihilated. The Fifty-fourth regiment has only one captain (Paschall) left, with five lieutenants, and about fifteen men remaining. The fragments of the brigade are now collected under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Tate, of the Sixth, and attached to the Louisiana brigade. These fragments now number about two hundred and seventy-five men. This is a
tion, and flanking either side of the road for a distance of over two miles. Our guns were in position some time before noon, but it was near that hour when the fight became warm. General Ferrero, in falling back on the Loudon road, came in advance of Colonel Hartrauft, and defiling to the right, (it would be to the left as he marched, but facing the enemy, it was the right,) took up his position in line of battle. Colonel Hartrauft, whose flank was now reenforced by a detachment of General White's command, under Colonel Chapin, came in rear of General Ferrero as he passed the fork of the road, and, marching to the left, came into position on the southern slope of the valley, Colonel Chapin still holding his position on the flank. A consideration of the whole movement will show with what admirable position each regiment and brigade came into line of battle. Indeed, the evolutions on the field at Campbell's Station have seldom been excelled in beauty and skill. In coming into p
ese desperadoes, who term themselves Southern chivalry, that bodies are mutilated, prisoners are outraged, and all are robbed. In Burnside's front, Longstreet is pressing, and skirmishing has been constant for the last three days. The train of White's division was burned, by order of General Burnside, to-day, and a section of Benjamin's battery was captured, making the third we have lost in the last ten days, namely, Laws's, Phillips's, and Benjamin's. The two armies are seventeen miles from point named. The enemy, who evidently expected to march without impediment into Knoxville, made a most confident and determined attack. They underestimated the value of the veteran soldiers of the Ninth army corps, and the obstinate courage of White's veteran boys, and were handsomely repulsed, with terrible loss. In vain they manoeuvred, and made charge after charge. They were met at every point. See page 189 ante. Skirmishing was kept up vigorously all day, and night fell upon the
an having provided himself with an abundant supply of poultry, in order to properly celebrate Christmas in the army. The expedition marched one hundred and twenty-five miles in four days, inflicting a serious blow to the enemy in the most vital part of their prosperity. I regret to announce that these perambulating Yankee cavaliers were allowed to help themselves to several dressed hogs, which were in readiness for the satisfaction of more refined appetites, such as the disciples of Mosby, White, and other prominent F. F. V. s. As our troops were out of rations, Colonel Smith had no scruples in allowing his troops to indulge in the secesh provender. On the person of the captured rebel sutler was found a revolver and a valuable gold watch. Seven thousand dollars in shinplasters, representing the currency of the would-be Confederacy, were found on the prisoners whom we captured, some fifteen or twenty in all. A large quantity of fine tobacco was confiscated in the town of Luray.
Colonel Draper was sent with two hundred men across Currituck Sound to Knott's Island, with orders to burn all the houses of guerrillas he could find, and to destroy if possible the camp of the company existing in that neighborhood. As the men were much fatigued, it was not proposed to hurry home, but, starting the next day, to march very slowly toward Norfolk, canvassing the country on the way. This plan, however, was destined to be suddenly changed. About the middle of the afternoon, Major White, of the Eighty-first New-York, stationed at North-West Landing, with a cavalry escort, arrived in haste at the headquarters of General Wild, with a despatch from General Ledlie, in charge of the district of Currituck, containing the information that a large rebel force had been sent down from the Blackwater to intercept the return of the colored troops, and that he was very solicitous for General Wild's safety. Under these circumstances, General Wild deemed it imprudent to remain any lon
y must sow and plant, and gather for the government. Then, and not till then, will the bright rays of peace break through the clouds of war which overhang us. P. W. White, Major and Chief Commissary. P. S.--You are specially requested not to allow this circular to go out of your possession, but to read it to such persons aake City, January 12, 1864. In conformity with instructions front department headquarters, of December twenty-eighth, 1863, and with the urgent request of Major P. W. White, C. S. for the State of Florida, the removal across the borders of the State (except for army consumption) of all articles of subsistence which make part of e District Commissaries. No purchases will be allowed in this district, either by commissaries or their agents from other districts, except under an order from Major White, C. S. for the State. Hides and tallow in the hands of speculators, middle-men, or others, will not be allowed to be removed, but will be impressed under order
mac Railroad as far as Haul Town. It is said that General Early, with a considerable force, is still at Winchester, and that he has gone into winter quarters there. H. E. T. List of killed and wounded. Medical Director's office, Harper's Ferry, Va., January 10, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded in the Independent battalion Maryland cavalry, Major Cole commanding, during an attack made on the camp on Loudon Heights, Va., by Mosby's and White's forces, at three o'clock A. M. on the tenth of January, 1864: Killed.--Sergeant J. J. Kerns, company B; private George Buford, company D. Wounded.--Company A: Captain G. W. F. Vernon, wound of head and left eye; Orderly Sergeant L. Zimmerman, flesh-wound of the left leg; private D. W. Carnes, gunshot, compound fracture of right leg; private H. F. Null, wound of abdomen; private I. Craighton, flesh-wound of left leg; private E. Goodwin, gunshot, compound fracture of left leg; private
gan, was sent on the macadamized pike to Robertson's Tavern; while General Kilpatrick, with the main body, proceeded down the Fredericksburgh plank-road to the vicinity of Chancellorsville, meeting no infantry force, and but small parties of cavalry, who fell back before his advance. In accordance with instructions, he returned to the vicinity of Culpeper Ford on Saturday night, to await further orders, and was there directed to return to camp, which he did the next day. On recrossing, Major White, with one battalion, was sent up the river, for the purpose of capturing any pickets which might be stationed at the upper fords. He recrossed the river at Jacob's Mills, where four or five videttes were taken prisoners. General Kilpatrick's reconnoissance conclusively proves that no force of the enemy occupies the country east of Mine Run. The small parties of cavalry all belonged to Hampton's Legion, which is stationed at Fredericksburgh. More than half the videttes have no horses
od one. We advanced the Fourth division to the timber on the opposite side of the field, and sent back for the Third division, General Cameron commanding, and for the Chicago Mercantile battery and First Indiana battery, both under charge of Captain White, Chief of Artillery detachment Thirteenth army corps. After gaining the opposite side of the field, we halted, and the fatigued men of the Fourth division lay down to take some rest, as they had marched sixteen miles, one half the time in li and Duncan's brigades of Lee's cavalry were scattered in every direction, and seventy of the cavalry baggage-wagons, with all of General Cameron's ambulances filled with our wounded, were captured. The Chicago Mercantile battery was gone, Captain White wounded and a prisoner, with twenty-two men of the battery missing. Nim's battery, the First Indiana, and two guns from battery G, Fifth United States regulars, had fallen into the hands of the enemy, with the four howitzers stationed on the