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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 12, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 1 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. W. White or search for W. W. White in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
to the west side of the Blue Ridge, crossed also, and moving rapidly to General Lee's front, have placed himself at once in direct communication with him. His bold activity would have developed the enemy's position, which, General Lee being no longer in ignorance of, could then have made his plans accordingly. In that event the battle would not in all probability have taken place at Gettysburg. In justice to Stuart, it may be said that he had calculated upon the brigade of Jenkins and White's batallion of cavalry, which accompanied Generals Ewell and Early, and Jones' and Robertson's brigades, which were left to guard the passes of the Blue Ridge, and were to rejoin General Lee as soon as the enemy crossed the river, to do all that was necessary. The brigade of General Jenkins, Stuart estimated at 3,800 troopers when leaving Virginia, and, referring to the complaint of the Commanding-General of a want of cavalry upon that occasion, says: Properly handled such a command should
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
June suggested to General Lee the advantage of a departure from a strictly defensive system, and of casting the defence of Richmond on a bold offensive campaign. Immediately on this decision the Army of Northern Virginia was put in motion for the invasion of the North. After this brief explanation I will return to the enquiries of .Small raiding parties always infested the line of the Potomac when not occupied in force by the Federal army. The raiding corps, under Colonels Mosby and White, were conspicuously known for their bold raids and dashing onslaughts upon trains and unsuspecting parties on both sides of the Potomac. Raiding parties of a more formidable character, under Stuart and others; were also projected across the lines, creating in the body politic of the North as little sensation as sticking pins in the hide of the rhinoceros. In continuation of the answer to the 2d question, I will repeat in substance the remarks of General Lee, when the invasion of the North
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel White, Commanding Anderson's brigade. (search)
Report of Colonel White, Commanding Anderson's brigade. Headquarters Anderson's brigade, August 8th, 1863. Maj. W. H. Sellers, A. A. Gen. : Sir: I have the honor to report the part borne by this brigade in the engagement near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the 2d and 3d ult. As I was not present myself (my regiment-7th Georgiahaving been detached and ordered to the right and flank of the line to watch the movements of the enemy's cavalry), I have consolidated the reports of the regimentother regiments coming up from different points, and suffered greatly from their fire. Early next morning the brigade was moved back to the main line, and threw up breastworks. The reports of regimental commanders, together with the complete list of the killed and wounded, have already been forwarded. It would be invidious to speak of individual gallantry where all Behaved so well. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. W. White, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
s the Potomac, to-wit: Fitz Lee's, Hampton's, and Wmn H. F. Lee's; Jenkins' brigade, not exceeding 1,500 or 1,600, accompanied Ewell, and one battalion of cavalry, White's, was with my division, while Imboden went along the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, then to McConnellsburg, and from thence by the way of Chambersburg to Gettysburgar, if there should be any truth in the reports. That was was by no means improbable, as we knew Stuart had had a fight at or near Hanover the day before, and Colonel White, who moved on the York road on the march back, had reported to me that a force of the enemy's infantry and cavalry had been on that road. Ewell, Rodes, and myy force in fighting trim cannot overtake a flying one; and it is well known that we had no cavalry up at that time, except a small regiment of Jenkins' cavalry and White's battallion which had been with me, and which I had to use in guarding the prisoners and the trains. What we wanted was not the possession of Cemetery or Culp's