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General Macomb, Governor Cass, and the civil, judicial, and municipal officers of the territory and city, citizens and strangers, and the non-commissioned officers and soldiers of the army. The funeral service was performed by the Rev. Mr. Larned. The procession was solemn and sublime. These services show the high esteem in which the brave and beautiful young officer was held by his comrades and commanders. The following elegiac lines, composed for the occasion, were written by Captain Whiting, of the Fifth Regiment :-- Too long on lonely isles neglected, Marked by no stone, thy dust has slept, By humble turf alone protected, O'er which rude time each year has swept. Ere many summers there had revelled, Decking thy grave with wild-flowers fair, The humid earth, depressed and levelled, Had left no index vestige there. Still had the wave around that dashes-- Scene of thy fate — the story told, And, 'gainst the isle that held thy ashes, In seeming fondness ceaseless rolled.
down, on a rate-bill, what he will contribute each Sunday. The persons who gathered these contributions were appointed from among the most trustworthy of the congregation. The great watchfulness of our fathers in these money-matters is seen in a vote passed at this period (1709). It is as follows:-- Voted to call Mr. John Whitmore to an account by what order he held out the contribution-box, and how he disposed of the money that was put therein. March 6, 1710: Voted to apply to Mr. John Whiting, Fellow of Harvard College, to preach for three months. This gentleman refused; and Mr. John Tufts was engaged for six months. At the end of this time, July 17, 1710, he engaged to supply the pulpit six months longer. The town now proposed a free contribution, in connection with a subscription, for the support of public worship. There is a bewildering queerness in the following vote, passed by the town April 19, 1710 :-- Put to vote, whether the town will allow Francis Whitmore s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 (search)
Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 Military officer; born in Lancaster, Mass., about 1790; joined the army in 1808; promoted first lieutenant in 1811; was placed on the staff of Gen. John P. Boyd, and afterwards on that of Gen. Alexander Macomb; promoted captain in 1817; was chief quartermaster of the army of General Taylor during the Mexican War: won distinction at Buena Vista, in recognition of which he was brevetted brigadier-general, United States army, Feb. 23, 1847. His publications include Ontway, the son of the forest (a poem) ; Life of Zebulon M. Pike, in Sparks's American biography; joint author of Historical and scientific sketches of Michigan, etc.; and editor of Washington's Revolutionary orders issued during the years 1778, 1780, 1781, and 1782, selected from the Mss. Of John Whiting. He died in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 1851.
ed by the sharp angles on the map. The line at White Street was somewhat changed April 30, 1856, and the line between Cambridge and Belmont and Arlington, was straightened Feb. 25, 1862. The northwesterly part of the town was made a separate precinct Dec. 27, 1732, and was afterwards styled the Second Parish, or more generally Menotomy. The line of division was Menotomy River from Charlestown till it comes to Spy Pond Brook; then on said brook till it comes to a water-course or ditch in Whiting's meadow, so called: the ditch to be the boundary till it comes to Hamblett's Brook, following the course of the Brook to the Bridge; thence on a straight line to the northwest corner of Mr. Isaac Holden's orchard, and continuing the same course to Watertown line. Mass. Prove. Rec., XII. 351. This tract, with the addition of the remaining territory on the westerly side of Menotomy River, was incorporated, Feb. 27, 1807, under the name of West Cambridge, Mass. Spec. Laws, IV. 88. which nam
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
s exceeded 'em & never deceiv'd 'em. Mr. Sewal upon—we have ys Treas. in earthin vessels &c. Mr. Sewal spake well, very well, of his ascended Master & father, concerning wm he cdnt be wholly silent, & then gave a breif, full, & good character, together wt his last words wc Mastr. Williams writ down. They'll all be in print. On Monday I assay'd again for Newton; but 'twas now also in vain. Nobody had been from Cambr. & there was lodg'd there Mr. Gerrish, Rogers, Fitch, Blowers, Prescot, Whiting, Chevers, & some others. Mr. Gerrish preach'd 23 Numb. 10, Mr. Rgs beg. with prayer. Mr. Fitch beg. in ye aft'n. Mr. Blow. preach'd 2 Ez. 5 ult. clause. At Boston wr lodg'd as prisoners Mr. Sheph. Loring, Barnard, Holyoke, Porter, &c. I ordered my horse over ye ferry to Bostn yesterday, designing to try Roxbury way—but was so discorag'd by gentlemen in town, especially by ye Govr. wt whom I din'd yt I was going to put up my horse and tarry till Thursd. & as I was going to do it I m
Trask. Stephen Tucker. Ebenezer Tufts. John Tufts. Jonathan Tufts. Nathan Tufts. Nathaniel Tufts. Samuel Tufts. George Turner. Wait Turner. Elijah Tuttle. Joseph Tuttle. John Vertys. John Vila. Thomas Wait. Edward Walker. Israel Walton. William Warland. Daniel Watson. Isaac Watson. William Watson. Ezra Welch. John Welch. Elijah Weld. Henry Weld. Job Wetherell. Thomas Wheeler. Andrew White. James White. John Whiting. Andrew Whitney. Nathaniel R. Whitney. Oliver Whitney. Timothy Whitney. Francis Whittemore. Nathan Whittemore. Samuel Whittemore, Jr. Thomas Whittemore. James Williams. Nathaniel Williams. Timothy Willison. George Wilson. Josiah Wilson. Thomas Wilson. William Wilton. Henry Win ship. Isaac Winship. John Winship. Coolidge Wood. Charles Wyman. Phipps Wyman. James Yates. The war against Great Britain, which was proclaimed on t
of Deacon Collins were Daniel; John; Samuel; Sybil: all born in England; Martha, b. Sept. 1639 ; Nathaniel, b. 7 Mar. 1641-2; .Abigail. b. 20 Sept. 1644, m. John Willett, who d. 2 Feb. 1663; Edward, bap. here, was living in 1663. Sybil m. Rev. John Whiting, and had in Camb. Sybil, John, and William, bap. 19 Feb. 1659-60. Phebe Collins, who d. 5 Jan. 1653-4, may have been dau. of Deacon Collins. 2. Daniel, s. of Edward (1), was in Koningsberg, Prussia, in 1658. It is not known whether hed John, b. 25 Jan. 1667-8, d. 3 June 1684; Elizabeth, b. 11 Feb. 1669-70, d. 2 Feb. 1687-8; Joseph, b. 16 Sept. 1671; Haynes, b. 1 Feb. 1677-8, resided in Camb., Woburn, and Concord, and was living in 1724; Alice, b——(elder than Haynes), m. Rev. John Whiting of Lancaster about 1693; he was killed by the Indians 11 Sept. 1697, and she m. Rev. Timothy Stevens of Glastonbury, Conn, 19 May 1701; her dau. Alice d. here 19 Oct. 1697. a. 2 years 10 mo., and Eunice, d. 4 Nov. 1697, a. 1 year. Joseph
of Deacon Collins were Daniel; John; Samuel; Sybil: all born in England; Martha, b. Sept. 1639 ; Nathaniel, b. 7 Mar. 1641-2; .Abigail. b. 20 Sept. 1644, m. John Willett, who d. 2 Feb. 1663; Edward, bap. here, was living in 1663. Sybil m. Rev. John Whiting, and had in Camb. Sybil, John, and William, bap. 19 Feb. 1659-60. Phebe Collins, who d. 5 Jan. 1653-4, may have been dau. of Deacon Collins. 2. Daniel, s. of Edward (1), was in Koningsberg, Prussia, in 1658. It is not known whether hed John, b. 25 Jan. 1667-8, d. 3 June 1684; Elizabeth, b. 11 Feb. 1669-70, d. 2 Feb. 1687-8; Joseph, b. 16 Sept. 1671; Haynes, b. 1 Feb. 1677-8, resided in Camb., Woburn, and Concord, and was living in 1724; Alice, b——(elder than Haynes), m. Rev. John Whiting of Lancaster about 1693; he was killed by the Indians 11 Sept. 1697, and she m. Rev. Timothy Stevens of Glastonbury, Conn, 19 May 1701; her dau. Alice d. here 19 Oct. 1697. a. 2 years 10 mo., and Eunice, d. 4 Nov. 1697, a. 1 year. Joseph
Chester, 510. Hooker. Russell. Sprague. Whiting. Clark, 510, 11. Andrew. Bonner. Champns. Gookin. Pike. Shepard. Stoughton. Whiting. Willett. Collins, 512. Clark. Collor, . Stratton. Swan. Tufts. Wellington. Whiting. Willard. Winship. Coolidge, 516. Browne. Ruggles. Sewall. Shepard. Symmes. Whiting. Wilson. Withington. Wright. Daniel, 53nton. Thwing. Tucker. Tyng. Whalley. Whiting. Gould, 566. Gove, 566, 7. Aspinwall. Bm. Sessions. Stacey. Stratton. Wait. Whiting. Wyeth. Wyman. Reed, 637-9. Baker. B Sewall. Thwing. Turner. Wellington. Whiting. Whitney. Wigglesworth. Williams. Spenc. Stearns. Stone. Straight. Swetman. Whiting. Whittemore. Winneck. Wyman. Yates. am. Warren. Watson. Weston. Wheeler. Whiting. Whitmore. Wilson. Winship. Wood. Wi
ee of Cambridge, July 24, 1732, for this purpose. See attested copy of vote, belonging to Mr. J. B. Russell of New Market, N. J. with other petitioners, and having carefully viewed the place and heard the parties, are humbly of opinion that the lands in the Northwest Part of said town petitioned for, be set off a distinct precinct by the following boundaries: On Menotomy River from Charlestown till it comes to Spy Pond Brook, then on said brook till it comes to a watercourse or ditch in Whiting's meadow, so called; the ditch to be the boundary till it comes to Hamblet's Brook, following the course of said brook to the Bridge, thence on a straight line to the northwest corner of Mr. Isaac Holden's orchard, and continuing the same course to Watertown line. And that the inhabitants of the said precinct be vested with all the powers, privileges and immunities that other precincts within this Province do, or by law ought to enjoy. The above report was accepted, Wednesday, Dec. 27,
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