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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 214 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 81 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 34 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for W. H. C. Whiting or search for W. H. C. Whiting in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
er; 27th Ga., Lieut.-Col. James Gardner; 28th Ga.,----. Ransom's Brigade. Composition not indicated. Artillery Battalion, Composition not indicated. Maj. W. M. Owen. Cavalry: 3d N. C., Col. John A. Baker; 7th S. C., Col. W. P. Shingler. Whiting's division, Maj.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 34th Va.,----; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Martin's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James G. Martin: 17th N. C.,----; 42d N. CMaj.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 34th Va.,----; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Martin's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James G. Martin: 17th N. C.,----; 42d N. C.,----; 66th N. C.,----. Cavalry, Brig.-Gen. James Dearing: 7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro; 8th Ga., Col. Joel R. Griffin; 4th N. C., Col. Dennis D. Ferrebee; 65th N. C., Col. G. N. Folk. Thirty-eighth Battalion Va. Artillery, Maj. J. P. W. Read: Blount's, Caskie's, Macon's, and Marshall's batteries. miscellaneous: Elliott's Brigade, Col. Stephen Elliott, Jr.: 61st N. C.,----; Holcombe (S. C.) Legion,----. Hunton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton: 8th Va., Capt. H. C. Bowie; 19th Va.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
s had also objected to the cooperation of General Whiting, which formed a salient feature of my pla our armies, and, at his request, changed General Whiting's order of march from Petersburg. But, w5th, at 10:45 A. M., I sent a telegram to General Whiting directing him. to march to Port Walthall army, if possible. The active cooperation of Whiting was, I thought, indispensable to attain such uitt's brigade, except the two regiments with Whiting, went to reinforce Ransom, with orders to resfirst, to inquire into the whereabouts of General Whiting, the sound of whose guns was said to haveire to resume the offensive. No news came of Whiting. The only portion of his force which communi one of the bearers of my instructions to General Whiting the day before, who had come, with the utely on any advance being made that day by General Whiting. From him I also learned that Dearing, iral troops; that nothing would have prevented Whiting from capturing the entire force of General Bu[9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
enry C. Nields, rowed up under the guns of the fort and through a deadly storm of shot and shell and picked them up. The gallantry of Nields's conduct was all the more striking in view of the fact that in pulling to the Tecumseh's wreck it was necessary to pass around the stern and under the broadside of the Hartford and across the Brooklyn's bow, thus placing the boat directly in the line of fire of the fleet as well as of the fort. In fact, as the boat at first carried no flag, Acting Ensign Whiting, in charge of the forecastle guns on board the Hartford, was about to fire at her, when some one standing by informed him of her character and errand. A moment later, Nields himself observed the omission, and took the flag from its case and shipped it. The rescued men were placed on board the Winnebago, and Nields and his boat's crew, unable to regain their ship, joined the Oneida, where they served during the remainder of the battle.--editors. Meantime the Brooklyn failed to go ahe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
a dispatch from the chief of artillery of General Whiting, to bring a light battery within the fortus, New York Harbor, February 19th, 1865, General Whiting blames General Bragg for the loss of Forthe Secretary of War, on January 13th; and General Whiting concludes with a feeling reference to the ranks, I held in reserve the infantry fire. Whiting stood upon the brink of the parapet inspiring Federal battle-flags upon our ramparts. General Whiting saw them at the same moment, and, callinghem on the parapet. Among those who followed Whiting, and who gave his young life upon those rampaheir guns, being too close to load and fire. Whiting had quickly been wounded by two shots and hadcome to the rescue, and it would save us. General Whiting remarked, Lamb, when you die I will assumightly of my wound. I asked him to carry General Whiting to a place of safety, as he had come to t Colquitt made a precipitate retreat, leaving Whiting behind. General Whiting died a prisoner at[9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
avy, Capt. William G. Pride; 16th N. Y. Battery, Capt. Richard H. Lee; E, 3d U. S., Lieut. John R. Myrick. Engineers: A, and 1, 15th N. Y., Lieut. K. S. O'Keefe. The effective strength of the force above enumerated was nearly 8000. The loss aggregated 184 killed, 749 wounded, and 22 missing = 955. By the explosion of a magazine the day after the capture there were 25 killed, 66 wounded, and 13 missing. The Confederate Army. General Braxton Bragg (department commander); Major-General W. H. C. Whiting (district commander). defenses, mouth of Cape Fear River, Brig.-Gen. Louis Hebert. Garrison of Fort Fisher, Col. William Lamb, Maj. James M. Stevenson (too ill for duty), Maj. James Reilly: 10th N. C. (1st Artillery), Maj. James Reilly (2 companies: Co. F, Capt. E. D. Walsh, Co. K, Capt. William Shaw); 36th N. C. (2d Artillery), Maj. James M. Stevenson (ill), Capt. Daniel Munn (10 companies: Co. A, Capt. R. J. Murphy, Co. B, Capt. Daniel Munn, Co. C, Capt. K. J. Braddy, Co.