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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 214 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 81 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 34 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for W. H. C. Whiting or search for W. H. C. Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 4 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
anied by Colonel E. Kirby Smith, Afterward lieutenant-general. acting adjutant-general, Major W. H. C. Whiting, Who fell at Fort Fisher, a major-general. of the Engineer Corps, Major E. McLean, of tthe mean while, every facility in his power for obtaining information relating to the post. Major Whiting, who had been his school-fellow, saw him at my request, and convinced him very soon that the delay than the time consumed by the messenger in bringing me Colonel Jackson's note, and by Major Whiting in going to that officer's quarters from mine. This little affair is mentioned, only becion and its environs, made on the 25th, with the assistance of an engineer of great ability, Major Whiting, convinced me that it could not be held against equal numbers by such a force as then occupiinchester under Brigadier-Generals Carson and Meem; and, especially to increase their value, Major Whiting was directed to have a few light defensive works constructed on the most commanding position
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
able delays caused so slow a rate of marching as to make me despair of joining General Beauregard in time to aid him. Major Whiting was therefore dispatched to the nearest station of the Manassas Gap Railroad, Piedmont, to ascertain if trains, capation had already been written, or determined on. He also promoted Colonel Elzey, Lieutenant-Colonel S. Jones, and Major W. H. C. Whiting, to brigadiergeneralciess. He offered me the command in Western Virginia, subsequently conferred on General Lee,burial, the nearest troops, a mile or mile and a half from the field, were not incommoded by its neighborhood; they were Whiting's (late Bee's) and Evans's brigades. I say this from personal observation, having been in their camps daily. After thenes, and Early, were encamped from seven to nine miles from the places of burial. Jackson's camp, After the removal of Whiting's and Evans's. the nearest to them, was about four miles off. The headquarters of the army were at the same distance. O
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our march required that he should be dislodged, and General Smith was intrusted with this service. He performed it very handsomely with Hampton's and Hood's brigades, under Whiting, driving the enemy, in about two hours, a mile and a half through the wood, to the protection of their vessels-of-war. General Smith's two brigades sustained a trifling loss in killed and wounded. If statements published in Northern newspapers are accurate, their loss was ten times as great as ours. The way being thus cleared, the march was resumed. Smith's and Magruder's divisions followed the road by New Kent Court-House, and Longstreet's and Hill's that by the Long Bridges. In t
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
scort of cavalry to reconnoitre. I am not sure whether Major Whiting of your staff, then with me, accompanied Colonel Lay-heh followed, and upon the state of facts then presented, Major Whiting said, in substance, that as a member of your staff he wuld direct — the further pursuit stopped. The views of Major Whiting thus expressed had, justly, great weight with, and possthe two brigades on the right and left of the road; and Major Whiting went to the junction to report, and sent me from there port after the battle, but did not write the details of Major Whiting's connection with the matter. General McGowan, of Aal) at once. I have just received information from General Whiting that the enemy's forces near Evansport have just been a copy of a report by Major-General Jackson. Brigadier-General Whiting informs me that Brigadier-General French and Captod between Barhamsville and their landing-place. Brigadier-General Whiting was directed by General Smith to dislodge him, wh