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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 214 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 81 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 34 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for W. H. C. Whiting or search for W. H. C. Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 5 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
hard Anderson; the Charleston Light Dragoons, Capt. B. H. Rutledge, and the German Flying Artillery, the latter attached to Col. Pettigrew's command, stationed at the east end of the island. These commands, with Ripley's battalion of South Carolina regular artillery and Capt. Robert Martin's mortar battery on Mount Pleasant, made up the force under General Dunovant. On Morris island, Gen. James Simons was commanding, with Lieut.-Col. W. G. De Saussure for his artillery chief, and Maj. W. H. C. Whiting for chief of staff. The infantry supports on the island were the regiments of Cols. John Cunningham, Seventeenth South Carolina militia, and Maxcy Gregg, Johnson Hagood and J. B. Kershaw, of the South Carolina volunteers. The artillery was in position bearing on Ship channel, and at Cummings point, bearing on Sumter. The fleet making no attempt to come in, the channel batteries took no part in the bombardment of Sumter. On Cummings point, six 10-inch mortars and six guns were p
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
n danger. Gen. G. W. Smith's division, under Whiting, was halted at Barhamsville (West Point) untick at Fair Oaks by theNine-mile road, and W. H. C. Whiting's division was to support the whole by gu General Johnston had ordered the brigades of Whiting, Hood, Pettigrew, Hatton and Hampton, under Wal right and rear. The head of these troops (Whiting's brigade), reaching Fair Oaks, were fired uperal Smith says, that as the musketry fire of Whiting, Pettigrew and Hampton rapidly increased, oped Hampton's left. The firing indicated that Whiting and Pettigrew were being fully occupied by thtreet. The brigades of Hood and Law composed Whiting's gallant division, which had marched from As feint on the right, which became an assault, Whiting coming up in time to join on Longstreet's lefLongstreet's staff, as a volunteer aide. General Whiting says: Though not on my staff, I shoulnboat batteries. Jackson sent D. H. Hill and Whiting forward, in order, and supported them with br[7 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
g an army under General Banks, in the waters of Beaufort, made General Whiting, commanding at Wilmington, apprehensive of an attack on that city. Pending the movement of Foster, General Whiting telegraphed to General Beauregard urgently to send troops to his assistance, as Wilmingid not move inland and the fleet did not appear off Cape Fear. General Whiting wrote General Beauregard that a storm at sea, which had lost tand three North Carolina light batteries, made up the whole of General Whiting's disposable force for the defense of Wilmington, after Gist's division was returned to Beauregard. Returning these troops, Whiting wrote to General Beauregard: I send you this note by your able Brigad accordingly that general was ordered to return and report to General Whiting for special duty, for which favor Whiting expressed his thanksWhiting expressed his thanks, referring to Gist as always cool, sensible and brave, characteristics which that officer manifested throughout his career. During Januar
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
r-Generals Vogdes and Strong. The brigade of Vogdes was already on Folly island, and had been since April 7th; Strong landed on the 6th of July, and Stevenson subsequently. On the 9th, General Beauregard telegraphed Mr. Davis of the presence in Stono and off the bar of thirty-eight vessels and five monitors, and at noon of the same day to Governor Bonham, and to Richmond, that an attack on Sumter along Folly and Morris islands is evidently imminent. General Mercer, at Savannah, and General Whiting, at Wilmington, were asked for support, and Generals Hagood and Walker were ordered to hold all available troops in the Second and Third districts in readiness, to march or take the cars for Charleston at a moment's warning. The batteries on Folly island were then under cover and still unknown. The only certain indication of the impending attack was reported by Capt. C. T. Haskell early on the morning of the 9th. That gallant and energetic officer had made a reconnoissance to the w
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
and though not a native of the State, served her with devotion in the great struggle of 1861-65. During the war he held the rank of major on the staff of Gen. W. H. C. Whiting, and was a most efficient officer. After the war he returned to Charleston and engaged in business. When Gen. Wade Hampton was governor he served upon hitil May, 1863. He was then detailed at Nassau a few weeks on ordnance service, and on his return was put in command of the city defenses at Wilmington, under General Whiting. In April, 1864, being ordered to report to General Longstreet, he was assigned to Cabell's battalion of artillery, with the rank of major, and in this capacree months later he was promoted to major of ordnance, and ordered to Wilmington, where he served as chief ordnance officer of that department on the staff of General Whiting. After the fall of Fort Fisher he accompanied General Bragg and was surrendered with the forces of General Johnston at Greensboro. Returning to his home aft