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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 214 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 81 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 34 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. C. Whiting or search for W. H. C. Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
best Brigades retained from the Army of Northern Virginia. Series I, volume XXVII, part III, serial no. 40. Gettysburg. R. E. Lee to General Sam Jones, page 858, June 3, 1863.Even with this reduction I am deficient in general transportation for commissary, quartermaster, &c., trains. R. E. Lee to General A. P. Hill, page 859, June 5, 1863.Third Army Corps in front of Fredericksburg; balance of the army moving north. R. E. Lee to Seddon, Secretary of War, June 8, 1863, page 868.Whiting and D. H. Hill. He does not seem to have projected much and has accomplished less. Nothing to be gained by remaining on the defensive. If the Department thinks it better to remain on the defensive, it has only to inform me. Troops not needed in the South. Sent to the armies in the field, we might hope to make some impression on the enemy. note.—On the way to Gettysburg.I Insufficient food, insufficient transportation, insufficient cavalry. No infantry reinforcements. Can't get his own
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
ising men, and I say Godspeed to him. Dave made an attempt on the Minnesota not long since with his torpedo, but failed, though it was not his fault. Webb, Read, Alexander Gassell, and some of our other fellows are looked for by the next flag of truce. They have had a hard time of it, and I hear that Gassell was at first rather harshly treated. You know that he has been made a commander, and deservedly so, I say. John Wilkiason has charge of the blockade runners at Wilmington. Lynch and Whiting, you know, had a blow up there, and I hear that the President had them both here for awhile. Bad boys, to be growling in school! Ben Loyall commands the ironclad Neuse, of two 6.4s, at Kingston, N. C. Cooke has the Albemarle, a similar vessel, at Halifax, N. C. No one has yet been ordered to the Virginia here. She will soon be ready for her officers and is perhaps the best and most reliable ironclad in the service. If you were not on more important duty, I am inclined to believe that yo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
f from his base at Bermuda Hundred; while General Whiting with some 4,000 men moving simultaneouslyuarded space on Butler's right. Ransom and Whiting to blame. Beauregard's plan of battle was gainst Butler's 30,000 with 19,000, including Whiting's co-operative force, instead of 29,000 effeco-operative column of 4,000 men, under Major-General Whiting, was got into position upon Butler's rtes. The shortcomings of Generals Ransom and Whiting in their execution are noted in General Beaurtion of things in his part of the field. General Whiting did not move at all, notwithstanding his rganized column was defiling within a mile of Whiting's 4,000 men of all arms, but a thin skirmish different times; a dispatch .had been sent to Whiting at 9 A. M., which was repeated at 9:30, to pras here suspended to wait communications from Whiting or the sound of his approach, and to reorganiht by 15,000 hastily assembled men (excluding Whiting's 4,000, which never reached the field, or wa[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
egiment, April 9, 1865,75; Infantry, 1st, on April 8, 1865, 8, 844 371; 14th offering of, 72; 10th, Company F, roll of, 15; Company D, 44th, history and roster of, 259; on the tax on tea in 1774,168. Von Hoist, opinion of the U. S. Constitution, 161. Wade, Ben J. F., 177. Walker, Miss Sue H., 378. Walker, Wm, 166. Washington and Lee, Unity of character of, 241. Washington, Bushrod C., 247. Washington Artillery, dead of, 301, 370. Webster, Daniel, 164, 176, 179. Webster the Spy, Hanging of, 388. Weed, Thurlow, 289. Weisiger, General David A. 204. Wells, Colonel James M., 309. Whiting, General W. H. C., 326 Wilderness Battle of, 1. Williams, Ben J. J., 178. Wilson, James H., 252. Wilson, Colonel James M, 86. Winfield, Colonel John G., 98. Wolseley's estimate of Lee, 114. Wood, Surgeon, Mahone's Division, 26; killed, 50. Wright, Ambrose R., 144. Young, George, killed, 337. Zimmer, Captain, Louis, 14. Zollicoffer, General Felix K., 304.