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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
leased with his spirit, and the familiar and candid way in which he unbosomed himself. Last evening I spent with Solicitor Whiting (the brother of William Whiting. Anna), and had a good time. Solicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton William Whiting. Anna), and had a good time. Solicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton appointed to expound the war powers of the Government under the Constitution, especially as relating to slavery, was a son of Mr. Garrison's early and steadfast supporter, Col. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the PresidenSolicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton appointed to expound the war powers of the Government under the Constitution, especially as relating to slavery, was a son of Mr. Garrison's early and steadfast supporter, Col. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the President, Mr. Garrison said to him: Mr. Lincoln, I want to tell you frankly that for every word I have ever spoken in your favor, I have spoken ten in favor of General Fremont; and he went on to explain how difficult he had found it to commend the PresidenCol. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the President, Mr. Garrison said to him: Mr. Lincoln, I want to tell you frankly that for every word I have ever spoken in your favor, I have spoken ten in favor of General Fremont; and he went on to explain how difficult he had found it to commend the President when the latter was revoking the proclamations of Fremont and Hunter, and reiterating his purpose to save the Union, if he could, without destroying slavery; but, Mr. President, he continued, from the hour that you issued the Emancipation Proclamat