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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jasper Whiting or search for Jasper Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 6 document sections:

Generals Joe Johnston, Huger, Magruder, G. W. Smith Whiting, Anderson, and other educated generals, was massed h's advance till four o'clock, at which time Major Jasper Whiting, of Gen. Smith's staff, whom I had sent to len. Smith's division moved forward at four o'clock, Whiting's three brigades leading. Their progress was impeds, were driven back to the railroad. At this point Whiting's own and Pettigrew's brigades engaged a superior fovernment especially to the manner in which Brig.-Generals Whiting and R. H. Anderson, and Colonels Jenkins, atack in front, and when the enemy were repulsed, Gen. Whiting was to march down theNine-mile road, but came un, who were falling back before Gen. Longstreet, General Whiting's division was attacked by the enemy on the lefement on our left; but this was promptly checked by Whiting, and the day ended. Early on Sunday morning, the e, but now that the order to advance was given by Gen. Whiting, the noise and shouting were unearthly. But soo
soners state that there are nine Federal regiments on the island, and that Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, of Oregon, (the chairman of the Breckinridge National Committee in the last Presidential campaign,) is in command. This man Stevens professed to be an ardent pro-slavery man before the war, and was here in Charleston, enjoying its hospitalities, only two years ago. There is much dissatisfaction here with the military authorities of the department, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy omong the troops. If, however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of North-Carolina, Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first-class general. A change of some kind is necessary to restore confidence to the troops and people.
eers, including a Louisiana major, of Blanchard's brigade. The strength of the enemy opposed to us has not been satisfactorily ascertained. The prisoners assert that Longstreet's division and part of Huger's were in the field. It is probable, as we know that Longstreet's and Huger's divisions, supported by Hill's corps, hold that line. We lost no prominent field-officers, but many line-officers were wounded — several killed. Two of Hooker's aids had horses killed under them, and Lieut. Whiting, aid to Gen. Robinson, lost an arm. Colonel Morrison, a volunteer aid, was also wounded. The most painful misfortune of the day was the mortal wounding of Lieut. Bullock, of the Seventh Massachusetts, who was struck in the back by a fragment of one of our own shells, while he was leading his company to support the battery. Massachusetts again suffered heavily. The First regiment lost ten killed and one hundred and nineteen wounded; the Seventh, two killed, fourteen wounded; the Eleven
on the right, resting on the Chickahominy swamp; A. P. Hill on his left; then Whiting, then Ewell, then Jackson, (the two latter under Jackson's command,) then D. Hive the enemy with irresistible fury; to our left emerge Hood's Texan brigade, Whiting's comes after, and Pender follows. The line is now complete, and forward ringigades, who formed our right; and we are positive that from the composition of Whiting's, Hood's, and Pender's brigades, who flanked the enemy and formed our left, they never could be made to falter; for Whiting had the Eleventh, Sixteenth and Second Mississippi, and two other regiments. Hood had four Texan and one Georgia regi By daybreak on Monday morning the pursuit was actively resumed. D. H. Hill. Whiting and Ewell, under command of Jackson, crossed the Chickahominy by the Grapevinee woods. On Tuesday morning D. H. Hill's division, on the right to Jackson, Whiting, Ewell, and Jackson's own division on the left, (Jackson commanding the three
effect as to compel us to change our position. The Ninth lost here, in wounded, twelve men. After changing our position still further to the left, I directed, in accordance with orders from the General commanding, the battery, company K, Captain Whiting, to open fire on the enemy's battery, across the creek, which he did, soon silencing it. Immediately after this we were ordered to ford the creek and form in line of battle on the bluff opposite, directly in front of the enemy, which order wed, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting Adjutant, (Adjutant Barnett being sick,) behaved splendidly, and performed every duty in the coolest manner and to my entire satisfaction. Captain Whiting and Lieutenant Morris, of battery company K, although not under my immediate notice, being detailed on artillery service in another part of the field, I learn behaved well--Lieutenant Morris making some excellent shots with his rifled guns,
effect as to compel us to change our position. The Ninth lost here, in wounded, twelve men. After changing our position still further to the left, I directed, in accordance with orders from the General commanding, the battery, company K, Captain Whiting, to open fire on the enemy's battery, across the creek, which he did, soon silencing it. Immediately after this we were ordered to ford the creek and form in line of battle on the bluff opposite, directly in front of the enemy, which order wed, and since had his leg amputated, behaved in the most admirable manner. Lieutenant Horner, acting Adjutant, (Adjutant Barnett being sick,) behaved splendidly, and performed every duty in the coolest manner and to my entire satisfaction. Captain Whiting and Lieutenant Morris, of battery company K, although not under my immediate notice, being detailed on artillery service in another part of the field, I learn behaved well--Lieutenant Morris making some excellent shots with his rifled guns,