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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 214 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 200 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 81 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 34 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. C. Whiting or search for W. H. C. Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
time confronted by Grant at the Rapidan. General W. H. C. Whiting was placed in command of the defences of Pnd immediately thereafter General Bragg sent to General Whiting an order saying that General Lee was pressed ve was submitted to me, his second in command, by General Whiting, for my opinion as to its execution. It was sito abandon the latter was to abandon Richmond. General Whiting declared that that was his own opinion, and ord It was read and considered by another besides General Whiting and myself. In two hours from the time it was s issuing orders for the defence of Petersburg, General Whiting again sent for me to wait on him at his quarteradvanced. The substance of that order was that he, Whiting, was, with all his available forces on both sides tcommander, who died nobly in battle afterwards, General Whiting did not move as promptly as he might. The two ing before Beauregard, when they were halted by General Whiting and ordered to fall back. But for this sad hin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
ston to await orders) on or about the 14th May, ‘64. Finding that General Pickett was very ill from fever, I ordered Genl. Whiting, then at Wilmington, to come at once to Petersburg to assume command, while I moved to Drury's Bluff, where General H Ransom's command, which came only on the morning of the 15th & the battle of D's b. was fought & won on the 16th—if General Whiting had obeyed my orders, which I sent him by three diff't couriers on the afternoon of the 15th we w'd nevertheless have captured or destroyed Butler's army. Bragg's last dispatch to Whiting could not have been dated before the 14th of May, for he only knew of my intended attack on the morning of that day. Fearful of interference from Richard in General Whiting'General Whiting's movement, I insisted as a part of my order to him, that he w'd obey no orders, from any source not passing through me. Such, General, are my recollections (distinct) of those events—which you will find in the No's. of the Land We Love, or Balti<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
one. Longstreet laughed and said: Don't get scared now that you have got him whipped. A little later, after describing the action of his five brigades, he relates an incident illustrating the power of the Federal rifled artillery, and I expect many an old soldier in this audience could duplicate it: I saw an artilleryman seated comfortably behind a very large tree, and apparently feeling very secure. A moment later a shell passed through the huge tree and took off the man's head. General Whiting's Division was on the extreme left. With the exception of a regiment on his right, his command did not fire a gun, but lay down in Poindexter's wheat field and received the shelling patiently all the evening, with a loss of six killed and 194 wounded. About 3 o'clock each division commander received the following order: July 1, 1862. General—Batteries have been established to act upon the enemy's line. If it is broken, as is probable, Armistead, who can witness the effect of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ler, President, John, 321. Tyrrell, Henry, 77. Valley Campaign, Jackson's, 103. Volunteer Soldier, The, 103. Von Browaer, Baron, 181. Waggaman, Colonel, Eugene, 10th Louisiana Infantry, sketch of, 180. Wall, H. C., 151. Wallace, General W. H., 15. Watterson, Henry, 18. Washington, Colonel L. Q., 193. Waterloo, Battle of, 219. Watkins, Major H. C., 5. West Virginia Campaign, 3. Whitaker's Mill captured, 4. White Horse, Incident of the officer on the, 105. Whiting, Gen. W. H. C., 10, 215. Wiatt, Chaplain W. E., 16. Wilcox, Ella Wheeler, 231. Wilderness, Battle of the, 259, 339. Wilson, Lt., Samuel, 139. Winchester, Battle of, 97. Wise, Barton Haxall, 1, 205. Wise's Brigade, Career of, 1. Wise, Capt., Geo. D., killed, 14. Wise, Gen. Henry A,, 86, ,206. Wise. Gen. Peyton, Native of, 14. Wright, Gen. G. J ,147. Wright, Gen. H. G., 287. Yorktown, Defense of, 155. Young, Gen. P. M. B., Tribute to, 146; his defense of Savannah, 150.