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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 36 6 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for William H. C. Whiting or search for William H. C. Whiting in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
rongly manned, it would be impossible to reduce it with ordnance such as could soon be obtained by the State. Capt. William H. C. Whiting, of the United States army engineers, who had an office in Savannah at that time, was absent at Fort Clinch, ol as dainty additions to the rations of the soldiers, in which acceptable service they took pride. On January 6th Captain Whiting, a North Carolinian who afterward held the rank of major-general in the Confederate States service, having been notision of the Oglethorpe barracks, through Lieut. W. S. Bassinger. Ordnance-Sergeant Burt, in charge in the absence of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinger to interfere with the barracks orconsistently maintained his position by refusing to have any official communication with Lieutenant Bassinger. Upon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sir: I am instructed by the governor
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
he Georgia forces at the front in Virginia were as follows: Bartow's old-time brigade—the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh infantry—under Gen. S. A. M. Jones; and Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs' brigade—First regulars, Second, Fifteenth and Seventeenth volunteers, and Blodgett's Georgia battery —were included in Van Dorn's division of Beauregard's army. The Twenty-first infantry, Col. John T. Mercer, was in Trimble's brigade of Kirby Smith's division; in Col. Wade Hampton's brigade, under General Whiting, in the vicinity of Dumfries, were the Nineteenth, Col. W. W. Boyd, and the Fourteenth, Col. A. V. Brumby; in General Wigfall's brigade of the same division was the Eighteenth infantry, Col. William T. Wofford, and in the garrison at Manassas, under Col. G. T. Anderson, were the Twenty-seventh regiment, Col. Levi B. Smith, and the Twenty-eighth, Col. T. J. Warthen. The Thirty-fifth infantry, Col. Edward L. Thomas, was in General French's brigade in the Aquia district, guarding the low
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
practicability of reinforcing you has been the subject of earnest consideration. It has been determined to do so at the expense of weakening this army. Brigadier-General Lawton with six regiments from Georgia is on the way to you, and Brigadier-General Whiting with eight veteran regiments leaves here today. The object is to enable you to crush the forces opposed to you. Leave your enfeebled troops to watch the country and guard the passes, covered by your cavalry and artillery, and with your main body, including Ewell's division and Lawton's and Whiting's commands, move rapidly to Ashland, by rail or otherwise, as you may find most advantageous, and sweep down between the Chickahominy and Pamunkey, cutting up the enemy's communications, etc., while this army attacks General McClellan in front. This was the outline of part of the plan of campaign against McClellan which first established the great military reputation of General Lee. In the army of Northern Virginia, as orga
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
He was made second lieutenant of ordnance in 1854, and first lieutenant in 1856. Being stationed in Louisiana and Texas, he participated in the combat with Cortina's Mexican marauders near Fort Broome, in December, 1859. When Georgia seceded from the Union he resigned his commission in the army of the United States, and was appointed captain, corps of engineers, C. S. A. His first service was at Charleston, S. C. Early in March, at the call of the governor of Georgia, Captain Boggs and Major Whiting were sent to Savannah, and General Beauregard, regretting the loss of these two most reliable and efficient officers, earnestly requested their immediate return or the assignment of others of equal ability. In April, Captain Boggs was sent to the assistance of Bragg at Pensacola. His skill in mounting artillery on fortifications was highly praised by both Beauregard and Bragg. He was warmly commended by General Bragg, in his report of the fight on Santa Rosa island, for the close reco