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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Sarah Whitman or search for Sarah Whitman in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
te by redeeming his domain in it from superstition, formalism, and uncharity. Oh! to have such a reputation, and deserve it! March 4. To-day have been allowed to visit the study of the late dear Bishop of Massachusetts. I took this pin from his pincushion, to keep for a souvenir. Made Rosalind write down the names of a number of the books. The library is a very generous one, comprising a large sweep of study and opinion. A charming frieze over the large window had been painted by Mrs. Whitman. We entered with a reverent feeling, as if in a sacred place.... The dining-room, and his seat thereat, with portraits of his parents and grandfather. The mother was of his color, dark of eyes and hair, strong temperament, otherwise no special resemblance. His father looked substantial but not remarkable. In mid-May she went to Chicago, to take part in the World's Congress of Representative Women, and in many of the other congresses and conferences of that notable year. May 16.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
of the Faneuil Hall meeting. May 4. The day was auspicious for our meeting. Although very tired with the preparations, I wrote my little screed, dressed, and went betimes to the Hall, where I was expected to preside. I found it prettily arranged, though at very small expense. I wore as a badge a tiny Greek flag made of blue and white ribbon, and brought badges of these colors for the young ladies who were to take up the collection. Many whom I had requested to come were present. Sarah Whitman, Lizzie Agassiz, Mrs. Cornelius Felton, Mrs. Fields, Mrs. Whitney, besides our Committee and Mrs. Barrows. M. Anagnos gave us the band of the Institution, which was a great help. They played several times. I introduced C. G. Ames, who made a prayer. My opening address followed. Mmes. Livermore and Woolson, and Anagnos made the most important addresses. As the band played America, a young Greek came in, bearing the Greek flag, which had quite a dramatic effect. The meeting was enth
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
us getting my ideas without payment, a very mean proceeding... . March 21. Tuskegee benefit, Hollis Street Theatre. this meeting scored a triumph, not only for the performers, but for the race. Bishop Lawrence presided with much good grace and appreciation. Paul Dunbar was the least distinct. Professor Dubois, of Atlanta University, read a fine and finished discourse. Booker Washington was eloquent as usual, and the Hampton quartet was delightful. At the tea which followed at Mrs. Whitman's studio, I spoke with these men and with Dunbar's wife, a nearly white Woman of refined appearance. I asked Dubois about the negro vote in the South. He thought it better to have it legally taken away than legally nullified. April 17. Kindergarten for the Blind .... I hoped for a good word to say, but could only think of Shakespeare's the evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones, intending to say that this does not commend itself to me as true. M
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
said: Go and say that! ... April 1.... A telegram announced the birth of my first great-grandchild, Harry Hall's infant daughter Julia Ward Howe Hall.. . . April 11. To Mrs. Bigelow Lawrence's, Parker House, to hear music. Mrs. [Henry] Whitman called for me. Delightful music; two quartettes of Beethoven's, a quintette of Mozart's, which I heard at Joseph Coolidge's some thirty or more years ago. I recognized it by the first movement, which Bellini borrowed in a sextette which I stuot been allowed to go to Quincy. It was more important that I should comfort for a moment the bruised heart of my dear friend than that I should be a guest at the Quincy Commencement. June 29. Heard to my sorrow of the death of delightful Sarah Whitman. Wrote a little screed for Woman's Journal which I sent... . In early July, she went to Concord for a memorial meeting in honor of Nathaniel Hawthorne. July 11. .... Alice Blackwell, some days ago, wrote beseeching me to write to Presi
am, Sr., II, 230, 231, 242, 264, 269, 275, 282. Wesselhoeft, William, Jr., II, 284, 333. Westminster Abbey, II, 6, 167, 171. Wheeler, Joseph, II, 264. Wheeling, I, 169. Wheelwright, Mrs., I, 300. Whipple, Charlotte, II, 267. Whipple, E. P., I, 210, 222, 262. Whistler, J. McN., II, 5, 72. White, Mr., II, 323, 361. White, A. D., I, 321. White, Daisy R., II, 168. White, Harry, II, 168. Whitehouse, Fitzhugh, II, 326. Whitman, Mrs., Henry, II, 313. Whitman, Sarah, II, 180, 228, 262, 325. Whitney, Bishop, II, 137. Whitney, Mrs., II, 228. Whitney, M. W., II, 265. Whittier, J. G., I, 138, 152, 153, 210, 344; II, 177, 187, 355, 367, 368. Letter of, I, 138. Wild, Hamilton, I, 201; II, 99. Wilde, Lady, II, 168. Wilde, Oscar, II, 70-72, 168. Wilde, Mrs., Oscar, II, 167-69. Wilderness, Battle of the, II, 253. William I, I, 4. William I (Prussia), I, 93, 94; II, 20. William II., II, 20. Williams, Dr., II, 205. Wi