hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 160 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 88 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 76 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Walt Whitman or search for Walt Whitman in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 3 document sections:

al of the two sections. One surges forward with the fire and dash of Southern temperament through an impassioned Walt Whitman during the war The most individual of American poets was born at Westhills, Long Island, in 1809, the son of a carpter growing until it had become several times the size of the original. At the end of the second year of the Civil War, Whitman went to Washington to care for his brother, who had been wounded in the battle of Fredericksburg. For the next three yes received a more enduring commemoration. Indeed, Lincoln has inspired the finest imaginative product of the period. Walt Whitman's mystic dirge, When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, which Swinburne enthusiastically pronounced the most sonorouning recognition when the end came in 1881 in the mountains of North Carolina. was there mourned in a symbolic way, but Whitman spoke in a poignant, personal way in O Captain, my Captain, which, partly on that account and partly because of its more
, is to be prized for the record it affords of the large soul of Walt Whitman. He witnessed little of life at the front, but he saw all of th far out of reach, studded, breaking out, the eternal stars. Walt Whitman. The bivouac in the snow The representative woman singe husband and of the South. Bivouac: to illustrate the poem by Whitman The encampment of the Army of the Potomac at Cumberland Landing is a scene strikingly similar to that described by Whitman. With the shadowy soldiers in the foreground one can gaze upon the Camp that filc of McClellan's army, in 1862, reveal, in much the same spirit as Whitman's poem, the actual life of the soldier. At the end of a hard day'ters, meanwhile, were gathered about the twinkling camp-fires that Whitman brings before our eyes. Night will soon fall, and the army will pand snowy white; The guidon flags flutter gayly in the wind. Walt Whitman. Roll-call ‘Corporal Green!’ the Orderly cried; ‘Here!’ was
nd lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations. Abraham Lincoln. O Captain! my Captain! This not very characteristic production of the most individual of American poets was directly inspired by the assassination of Lincoln. Whitman had returned from his hospital service in Washington to his home in Brooklyn to complete the arrangements for printing Drum-Taps, his Civil war poems, at his own expense. He was with his mother on the morning of April 15, 1865, when the news caThe ship is anchored safe and sound, its voyage closed and done, From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won; Exult O shores, and ring O bells! But I, with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. Walt Whitman. Ode recited at the Harvard commemoration The ode from which the two strophes below are selected is in some respects the highest achievement thus far in American literature. James Russell Lowell, who had already made his name in lett