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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 160 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 88 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 76 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Walt Whitman or search for Walt Whitman in all documents.

Your search returned 80 results in 7 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
year, the family suffered keenly from the pinch of poverty. The year 1848 saw the culmination of two unhappy love-affairs—first, with Mrs. Shew, who had nursed the poet through a spell of illness following the death of his wife, and then with Mrs. Whitman, the Rhode Island poetess; and this year also witnessed the publication of his Eureka, a philosophical disquisition on the origin and composition of the universe. The year 1849 opened auspiciously for the poet; during the first half he wrot's friend, C. F. Briggs, with whom he was associated for several months in 1845 as co-editor of the Broadway journal, he was badly made up, a characterless character, and utterly deficient of high motive. And Horace Greeley was disturbed lest Mrs. Whitman should marry him, giving it as his opinion that such a union would be a terrible conjunction. To N. P. Willis, on the other hand, who perhaps knew him better than any other outside of his immediate family during his last half-dozen years, the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
ery far, and has the opportunity for limitless development upward. Beecher's close contact with his audience and the abundance of his imagery are the sources of his peculiar power. They keep his style homely and racy (Robert South he declared to have been his chief model), and hold his thought and feeling near to human needs. He deliberately cultivated both. He carried pocketfuls of gems, which he loved to turn over and examine; he haunted picture-galleries and jewellers' shops. Like Whitman, whom he is said to have influenced, he walked the streets, spent whole days among the docks and ferry boats, made himself familiar with all sorts of trades, and talked with all sorts of people. These sources of power were also at times sources of weakness. Beecher came to depend upon hearers rather than readers; his hand faltered when he felt himself out of contact with an audience; and as he could not bring himself to revise with any degree of care the reports of his oral discourse, the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
Chapter 24: Lowell Neither Lowell's poetry nor prose has that obvious unity of effect which characterizes the work of so many nineteenth century writers. His work does not recall, even in the minds of its admirers, a group of impressions so distinct and fixed as those summoned by the poetry of Whittier, Poe, or Whitman, or by that of Swinburne, Morris, or Browning, or by the prose of Thoreau or Emerson, of Ruskin or Arnold. His work, indeed, does not have the marks of a dominant or of a peculiar personality; nor does it add to literature a new group of ideas or a new departure in workmanship. Though its volume is large, and though a number both of his poems and his essays have won a wide familiarity, there is difficulty in summarizing their qualities of form or matter in a way that will indicate with justice his importance in American literature. This somewhat miscellaneous appeal made by his writing may be ascribed in part, no doubt, to a lack of literary power that preve
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: Whitman (search)
lishable. Born in the same year as Lowell, Whitman may be said to represent the roots and trunk r a high temper, displayed on occasion, which Whitman seems to have inherited from his father. selfa few poems were similarly twice published by Whitman, in the lax fashion of the day. See Bibliograsion. Here it will be sufficient to refer to Whitman's autobiographical note published in The critt Levi D. Slamm's Plebeian; and a letter from Whitman's friend, T. H. Rome, the first printer of thg that adhesiveness or manly attachment which Whitman then considered the true cement of a democrac life was destined to a sudden end. Just when Whitman was beginning to make literary friends abroad readers in America, lightened the burdens of Whitman's last years, affording him comforts that wouport of an imbecile brother, to care for whom Whitman had for many years saved money from his own sd in poets or prophets, as such, have gone to Whitman for the refreshing presence of a man and a wr[54 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
lt pulses throbbing beneath the rude exterior of American life. Of such were Lowell, Whittier, Whitman, and various more ephemeral writers who felt the stirring times. To them it was not satisfying with which he encouraged the fighters for freedom and exulted over the victory of their aims. Whitman, See also Book III, Chap. I. already the prophet, though as yet hardly heard, of a mystical's Sherman's in Savannah rhymed the name of the fallen city with banner. Strangely haunting is Whitman's Ethiopia Saluting the Colors. Also haunting, but sad, is Melville's A Dirge for McPherson—— ed forth, associated, for the most part, with the name of Lincoln. Stoddard's Abraham Lincoln, Whitman's When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloomed (not to be mentioned with the popular but less valuable O Captain! My Captain!), and Lowell's Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration. Whitman had written not a few vivid descriptions of war scenes, and he stands alone among all the poets of his t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
(1879), of Hayne (1882), he finds a much larger number of Southern poems that fit into his plan of suggesting the story of the Civil War by poems written at the time. Thus for the first time a systematic arrangement was made of this material. The result is altogether striking. The Southern poems, while slightly fewer in number (the proportion is 60 to 85), measure up well with those of the North. Side by side in this volume appear Bryant's Our country's call and Timrod's A Cry to Arms, Whitman's Beat, beat drums and Randall's My Maryland, Pike's Dixie and The battle hymn of the republic, Holmes's Voyage of the good ship Union and Ticknor's Virginians of the Valley, Lowell's Commemoration ode and Timrod's Ode to the Confederate dead, and at the very end Finch's The blue and the Gray and Lanier's The Tournament—both of them prophetic of a new national era. Not only was Browne's idea happy and well executed; his introduction and notes are invaluable. He established the fact that t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
George III, 142 George Eliot. See Cross, Marian Evans George Selwyn (Walt Whitman), 263 n. Georgia scenes, 153, 347, 389 Georgia sketches, 389 GeorLongfellow), 40, 228 Inland voyage, an, 6, 9 Inman, Henry, 174 In re Walt Whitman, 266 n. In School days, 241 In state, 281 Internal evidences of the g of a solitary man, the, 19 Journal of commerce, 187 J. R. S. (pseud. for Whitman), 262 n. Judas MacCABAEUSabaeus, 37, 39 Jumping frog of Calaveras County,gland, 217 Notes on the situation, 318 Notes on Virginia, 201 Notes on Walt Whitman as Poet and Person, 262 n. Nothing to wear, 241 Nott, Henry Junius, 15209 Poems by two brothers, 44 Poems by Victor and Cazire, 44 Poems by Walt Whitman, 271 Poems of Adrian, the, 45 Poems of American history, 304 Poems of tman, George, 269, 271 Whitman, Jeff, 263 Whitman, Walter, Sr., 259 Whitman, Walt, 218, 245, 258-274, 276, 277, 284, 286, 303 Whitman, Sarah Helen, 60, 61