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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 160 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 88 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 76 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for Walt Whitman or search for Walt Whitman in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 1: Longfellow as a classic (search)
on, for instance, up to September, 1901, were 487; under Longfellow, 357; then follow, among English-writing poets, Browning (179), Emerson (158), Arnold (140), Holmes (135), Morris (117), Lowell (114), Whittier (104), Poe (103), Swinburne (99), Whitman (64). The nearest approach to a similar test of appreciation in the poet's own country is to be found in the balloting for the new Hall of Fame, established by an unknown donor on the grounds of the New York University with the avowed object of xtremely limited. The popular impression in such matters is too deep to be easily removed; and yet every test continues to prove that the hold taken on the average human heart by Longfellow is far greater than that held, for instance, by Poe or Whitman. This was practically conceded by those poets themselves, and it is this fact which in reality excited the wrath of their especial admirers. No man ever sacrificed less for mere fame than Longfellow, no man ever bore attack or jealousy with mo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 23: Longfellow as a poet (search)
ver to publish, because they were too delicate for publication. Life, III. 356. Quite akin to this was another remark made by him to the same friend, that the desire of the young poet is not for applause, but for recognition. The two remarks limit one another; the desire for recognition only begins when the longing for mere expression is satisfied. Thoroughly practical and methodical and industrious, Longfellow yet needed some self-expression first of all. It is impossible to imagine him as writing puffs of himself, like Poe, or volunteering reports of receptions given to him, like Whitman. He said to Mr. Winter, again and again, What you desire will come, if you will but wait for it. The question is not whether this is the only form of the poetic temperament, but it was clearly his form of it. Thoreau well says that there is no definition of poetry which the poet will not instantly set aside by defying all its limitations, and it is the same with the poetic temperament itself.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
ticizes Longfellow's anti-slavery poems, 167. Webster, Daniel, 6. Weimar, 289. Weld, Miss, Emeline, describes Mrs. Longfellow, 64. Wells, George W., Longfellow writes to, 37. Wendell, Prof., Barrett, 142; his Literary History of America, cited, 142 note. Wesselhoeft, Dr., Robert, 161. West Point, N. Y., 18. Westminster Abbey, service of commemoration for Longfellow at, 248-257. Weston, Miss Anne W., 167. Weston Mss., cited, 167 note. White Mountains, 51, 132. Whitman, Walt, 6, 10, 276. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1, 6, 68, 134, 168, 258, 265, 267, 285, 294; thanks Longfellow for his antislavery poems, 167; his literary position, 259; relations with Longfellow, 271. Wijk, Mr., 101-103. Wijk, Mrs., 102, 103. Wilcox, Carlos, 145. Wilde, Oscar, 292. Wilkins, Mary, 198. Willis, Nathaniel P., 8, 19, 89, 90, 247. Windsor Castle, 221. Winter, William, on Longfellow's unpublished poems, 276. Winthrop, R. C., 222. Wiseman, Cardinal, on Longfellow, 281.