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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Myron W. Whitney or search for Myron W. Whitney in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
r history Did in your passing fall. Years of sweet converse, of following and dependence, end with this event. So we come to the last day at the ranch, the parting with the dear sister; the departure for San Francisco, laden with roses and good wishes. On the way eastward she stopped at Salt Lake City, and went to the Mormon Tabernacle; an enormous building with a roof like the back of a turtle; many tourists present. The Mormons mostly an ill-looking and ill-smelling crowd. Bishop Whitney, a young man, preached a cosmopolite sermon, quoting Milton and Emerson. He spoke of the Christian Church with patronizing indulgence; insisted upon the doctrine of immediate and personal revelation, and censured the Mormons for sometimes considering their families before their church. Communion, bread in silver baskets and water in silver cups, handed to every one, children partaking with the rest; no solemnity. June 26. To visit the penitentiary, where thirty Mormon bishops are im
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
our meeting. Although very tired with the preparations, I wrote my little screed, dressed, and went betimes to the Hall, where I was expected to preside. I found it prettily arranged, though at very small expense. I wore as a badge a tiny Greek flag made of blue and white ribbon, and brought badges of these colors for the young ladies who were to take up the collection. Many whom I had requested to come were present. Sarah Whitman, Lizzie Agassiz, Mrs. Cornelius Felton, Mrs. Fields, Mrs. Whitney, besides our Committee and Mrs. Barrows. M. Anagnos gave us the band of the Institution, which was a great help. They played several times. I introduced C. G. Ames, who made a prayer. My opening address followed. Mmes. Livermore and Woolson, and Anagnos made the most important addresses. As the band played America, a young Greek came in, bearing the Greek flag, which had quite a dramatic effect. The meeting was enthusiastic and the contribution unusual for such a meeting, three hun
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
y services held in Boston Theatre. it was the real thing. I never imagined possible such a genuine sweeping emotion as when that audience began to sing the Battle Hymn. if Boston was cold, it was thawed by the demonstration on Tuesday. Myron W. Whitney started to sing. He bowed to a box, in which we first recognized Mrs. Howe, sitting with the Misses Wheeler. You should have heard the yell. We could see the splendid white head trembling; then her voice joined in, as Whitney sang, in theWhitney sang, in the beauty of the lilies, and by the time he had reached the words,-- as he died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, the whole vast audience was on its feet, sobbing and singing at the top of its thousands of lungs. If volunteers were really needed for the Philippines, McKinley could have had us all right there. the same evening she went to Unitarian meeting in Tremont Temple, where read my screed about Governor Andrew, which has cost me some work and more anxiety. Rev. S. A. E
Daisy R., II, 168. White, Harry, II, 168. Whitehouse, Fitzhugh, II, 326. Whitman, Mrs., Henry, II, 313. Whitman, Sarah, II, 180, 228, 262, 325. Whitney, Bishop, II, 137. Whitney, Mrs., II, 228. Whitney, M. W., II, 265. Whittier, J. G., I, 138, 152, 153, 210, 344; II, 177, 187, 355, 367, 368. Letter of, I, 13Whitney, Mrs., II, 228. Whitney, M. W., II, 265. Whittier, J. G., I, 138, 152, 153, 210, 344; II, 177, 187, 355, 367, 368. Letter of, I, 138. Wild, Hamilton, I, 201; II, 99. Wilde, Lady, II, 168. Wilde, Oscar, II, 70-72, 168. Wilde, Mrs., Oscar, II, 167-69. Wilderness, Battle of the, II, 253. William I, I, 4. William I (Prussia), I, 93, 94; II, 20. William II., II, 20. Williams, Dr., II, 205. Williams, Mrs., Harry, II, 93. Williams, RWhitney, M. W., II, 265. Whittier, J. G., I, 138, 152, 153, 210, 344; II, 177, 187, 355, 367, 368. Letter of, I, 138. Wild, Hamilton, I, 201; II, 99. Wilde, Lady, II, 168. Wilde, Oscar, II, 70-72, 168. Wilde, Mrs., Oscar, II, 167-69. Wilderness, Battle of the, II, 253. William I, I, 4. William I (Prussia), I, 93, 94; II, 20. William II., II, 20. Williams, Dr., II, 205. Williams, Mrs., Harry, II, 93. Williams, Roger, I, 4. Williams Hall, I, 185. Willis, N. P., I, 262. Wilman, Helen, II, 325. Wilson, Mrs. B. M., II, 266. Winchendon, II, 314. Winchester, I, 188. Windermere, I, 92. Winslow, Erving, I, 346. Winslow, Helen M., II, 270. Wintergreen Club, II, 361. Winthrop, Lindall, II, 251. Winthrop, R. C.,