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John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel W. Whitney or search for Nathaniel W. Whitney in all documents.

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a considerable extent it was, and is-public opinion could not have more quickly veered about. Slavery became the popular idol in the North as well as in the South. Opposition to it was not only offensive, but dangerous. It was sacrilege. So far as the South was concerned the revolution is easily accounted for. Slavery became profitable. A Yankee magician had touched it with a wand of gold, and from being a languishing, struggling system, it quickly developed into a money-maker. Whitney, the Connecticut mechanical genius, by the invention of the cotton-gin, made the production of cotton a highly lucrative industry. The price of negroes to work the cotton fields at once went up, and yet the supply was inadequate. Northernly slave States could not produce cotton, but they could produce negroes. They shared in the golden harvest. Such cities as Baltimore, Washington, Richmond, Wheeling, and Louisville became centers of a flourishing traffic in human beings. They had grea
and Wendell Phillips; Henry Brewster Stanton, a very vigorous Anti-Slavery editor and the husband of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the champion of women's rights; Theodore Parker, the great Boston divine; 0. B. Frothingham, another famous preacher; Thomas Wentworth Higginson, the writer; Samuel Johnson, C. L. Redmond, James Monroe, A. T. Foss, William Wells Brown, Henry C. Wright, G. D. Hudson, Sallie Holley, Anna E. Dickinson, Aaron M. Powell, George Brodburn, Lucy Stone, Edwin Thompson, Nathaniel W. Whitney, Sumner Lincoln, James Boyle, Giles B. Stebbins, Thomas T. Stone, George M. Putnam, Joseph A. Howland, Susan B. Anthony, Frances E. Watkins, Loring Moody, Adin Ballou, W. H. Fish, Daniel Foster, A. J. Conover, James N. Buffum, Charles C. Burleigh, William Goodell, Joshua Leavitt, Charles M. Denison, Isaac Hopper, Abraham L. Cox. To the above should be added the names of Alvin Stewart of New York, who issued the call for the convention that projected the Liberty party, and of John K
nia, 21. W Wade, Benjamin F., 44, 179, 205. Wakefield, Horace P., 202. Walker, Jonathan, branded, 119. Washington, Booker, 136. Watkins, Frances E., 205. Weld, Theodore W., 103, 204. Wheeling, Va., slavery traffic in, 50. Whigs, 2, 5-7, 9. White, James, 203. Whitney, Eli, 31. Whitney, Nathaniel, 205. Whitson, Thomas, 203. Whittier, John G., 202. Wilkes, 179. Winslow, Isaac, 202. Winslow, Nathan, 202. Wise, Henry A., 70. Wright, Elizur, Jr., 203. Wright, Henry C., 205. nia, 21. W Wade, Benjamin F., 44, 179, 205. Wakefield, Horace P., 202. Walker, Jonathan, branded, 119. Washington, Booker, 136. Watkins, Frances E., 205. Weld, Theodore W., 103, 204. Wheeling, Va., slavery traffic in, 50. Whigs, 2, 5-7, 9. White, James, 203. Whitney, Eli, 31. Whitney, Nathaniel, 205. Whitson, Thomas, 203. Whittier, John G., 202. Wilkes, 179. Winslow, Isaac, 202. Winslow, Nathan, 202. Wise, Henry A., 70. Wright, Elizur, Jr., 203. Wright, Henry C., 205.