Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for John G. Whittier or search for John G. Whittier in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
rked upon it a day and a half, to chip off large bits of marble; but she did not venture to have him go within several inches of the surface she intended to work. Miss Hosmer is going to Rome in October, accompanied by her father, a plain, sensible man, of competent property. She expects to remain in Italy three years, with the view of becoming a sculptor by profession. Mrs. Stowe's truly great work, Uncle Tom's Cabin, has also done much to command respect for the faculties of woman. Whittier has poured forth verses upon it; Horace Mann has eulogized it in Congress; Lord Morpeth is carried away with it; the music stores are full of pieces of music suggested by its different scenes; somebody is going to dramatize it; and 100,000 copies sold in little more than six months! Never did any American work have such success! The passage of the Fugitive Slave Law roused her up to write it. Behold how God makes the wrath of man to praise him! Charles Sumner has made a magnificent speech
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), chapter 84 (search)
Lines written by Mrs. Child on the anniversary of the death of Ellis Gray Loring. these verses of Mrs. Child, though written on the first anniversary of Mr. Loring's death, were not published till some years after, which accounts for the allusions to the extinction of slavery in Mr. Whittier's response. May 24, 1859. Again the trees are clothed in vernal green; Again the waters flow in silvery sheen; But all this beauty through a mist I see, For earth bloomed thus when thou wert lost to me. The flowers come back, the tuneful birds return, But thou for whom my spirit still doth yearn Art gone from me to spheres so bright and far, Thou seem'st the spirit of some distant star. O for some telegram from thee, my friend Some whispered answer to the love I send! Or one brief glance from those dear guileless eyes, That smiled to me so sweetly thy replies. My heart is hungry for thy gentle ways, Thy friendly counsels, and thy precious praise; I seem to travel through the dark alone, Sinc
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reply of Mrs. Child. (search)
the slave to be agreeable to slave-holders. Literary popularity was never a paramount object with me, even in my youth ; and, now that I am old, I am utterly indifferent to it. But, if I cared for the exclusion you threaten, I should at least have the consolation of being exiled with honorable company. Dr. Channing's writings, mild and candid as they are, breathe what you would call arrant treason. William C. Bryant, in his capacity of editor, is openly on our side. The inspired muse of Whittier has incessantly sounded the trumpet for moral warfare with your iniquitous institution ; and his stirring tones have been answered, more or less loudly, by Pierpont, Lowell, and Longfellow. Emerson, the Plato of America, leaves the scholastic seclusion he loves so well, and, disliking noise with all his poetic soul, bravely takes his stand among the trumpeters. George W. Curtis, the brilliant writer, the eloquent lecturer, the elegant man of the world, lays the wealth of his talent on the
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
to go with her. Her sister owns a mill, where the Artichoke joins the Merrimack .... Friend Whittier lives about four miles from the mill, across the river. The bridge was being repaired, which ms that I feel a sort of farewell tenderness for the earth, because I am growing old. Friend Whittier and his gentle Quakerly sister seemed delighted to see me, or, rather, he seemed delighted and who fired hot shot at Governor Wise. In the interim, however, I had some cosy chat with Friend Whittier, and it was right pleasant going over our anti-slavery reminiscences. Oh, those were glorious helpers were priests or infidels. That's the service that is pleasing in the sight of God. Whittier made piteous complaints of time wasted and strength exhausted by the numerous loafers who came l, sister, I had hard work to lose him, but I have lost him. But I can never lose a her, said Whittier. The women are more pertinacious than the men; don't thee find 'em so, Maria? I told him I di
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Henrietta Sargent. (search)
hind the clouds. I have never in my life felt the presence of God as I do at this crisis. The nation is in his hand, and he is purging it by a fiery process. The people would not listen to the warnings and remonstrances of the abolitionists, uttered year after year in every variety of tone, from the gentle exhortations of May and Channing to the scathing rebukes of Garrison; from the close, hard logic of Goodell to the flowing eloquence of Phillips. More than a quarter of a century ago, Whittier's pen of fire wrote on the wall,-- Oh! rouse ye, ere the storm comes forth,-- The gathered wrath of God and man! In vain. The people went on with their feasting and their merchandise, and lo! the storm is upon us Every instance of sending back poor fugitive slaves has cut into my heart like the stab of a bowie-knife, and made me dejected for days ; not only because I pitied the poor wretches who trusted the government in vain, but because I felt that all moral dignity was taken o
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, September 10, 1861. Dear friend Whittier,--. .. Nothing on earth has such effect on the popular heart as songs, which the soldiers would take up with enthusiasm, and which it would thereby become the fashion to whistle and sing at the street corners. Old John Brown, Hallelujah! is performing a wonderful mission now. Where the words came from, nobody knows, and the tune is an exciting, spirit-stirring thing, hitherto unknown outside of Methodist conventicles. But it warms up soldiers and boys, and the air is full of it; just as France was of the Marseillaise, whose author was for years unknown. If the soldiers only had a song, to some spirit-stirring tune, proclaiming what they went to fight for, or thought they went to fight for,--for home, country and liberty, and indignantly announcing that they did not go to hunt slaves, to send back to their tyrants poor lacerated workmen who for years had been toiling for the rich without wages; if they had
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
y would say, He leff de land. At least, so speak all the slaves I have talked with, or whose talk I have seen reported. What a glorious, blessed gift is this gift of song, with which you are so lavishly endowed! Who can calculate its influence, which you exert always for good! My David, who always rejoices over your writings, was especially pleased with the Boat Song, which he prophesies will be sung ere long by thousands of darkies. He bids me say to you that One bugle note from Whittier's pen Is worth at least ten thousand men. So you see that you are at least equal to a major-general in the forces you lead into the field, and your laurels are bloodless. You have of course read The Rejected Stone, >The Rejected Stone; or, Insurrection vs. Resurrection in America by a Native of Virginia. (M. D. Conway.) Boston, 1861. for it is the most powerful utterance the crisis has called forth. God sends us so many great prophets that it seems as if he thought us worth saving;
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
idea that you shared her aversion to being muched, and so I concluded to let your birthday slide. I dare say, after all, that you were rather pleased with having the anniversary marked by so many kindly memorials. For my part I am delighted to find a few flowers on the mile-stones as I pass along. No matter how simple they are; a buttercup is as good as a japonica; somebody placed it there who remembered I was going by, and that is sufficient. What a blessing it was for that dear good man, S. J. May, to pass away in the full possession of his faculties, and surrounded by such an atmosphere of love and blessing. Friend Whittier, writing to me the other day, says: How many sweet and precious memories I have of my intercourse with him! Where is he now? What is he doing and thinking? Ah me! we beat in vain against the doors of that secret of God! But I am so certain of God's infinite goodness and love, that I think I can trust myself, and all I hold dear, to his love and care.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To the same. (search)
To the same. Wayland, 1876. Whittier, in one of his letters to me, expresses himself about your beloved Robert, thus: I know of nothing nobler or grander than the heroic self-sacrifice of young Colonel Shaw. The only regiment I ever looked upon during the war was the 54th, on its departure for the South. I shall never forget the scene. As he rode at the head of his troops, the very flower of grace and chivalry, he seemed to me beautiful and awful as an angel of God come down to lead the host of freedom to victory. I have longed to speak the emotions of that hour, but I dared not, lest I should indirectly give a new impulse to war. For his parents I feel that reverence which belongs to the highest manifestation of devotion to duty and forgetfulness of self, in view of the mighty interests of humanity. There must be a noble pride in their great sorrow. I am sure they would not exchange their dead son for any living one.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
o, $6.75. Red-Line Edition. Portrait. 12 illustrations. $2.50. Diamond Edition. 18mo, $1.00. Library Edition. Portrait. 32 illustrations. 8vo, $4.00. Prose Works. Cambridge Edition. 2 vols. $4.50. John Woolman's Journal. Introduction by Whittier. $1.50. Child Life in Poetry. Selected by Whittier. Illustrated $2.25. Child Life in Prose. $2.25. Songs of Three Centuries. Selected by J. G. Whittier. Household Edition. 12mo, $2.00. Illustrated Library Edition. 32 illustrationected by Whittier. Illustrated $2.25. Child Life in Prose. $2.25. Songs of Three Centuries. Selected by J. G. Whittier. Household Edition. 12mo, $2.00. Illustrated Library Edition. 32 illustrations. $4.00. Justin Winsor. Reader's Handbook of the American Revolution. 16mo, $1.25. A catalogue containing portraits of many of the above authors, with a description of their works, will be sent free, on application, to any address. Houghton, Mifflin and Company, Boston, Mass.