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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
son establishes in Newburyport the free Press, and brings Whittier to light. XVII Although his own political sympathies y office, one day, I observed a letter Ms., Lecture on Whittier. lying near the door, to my address; which, on opening, Idescribed, and that it was written by a Quaker lad, named Whittier, who was daily at work on the shoemaker's bench, with hametained control of it. Two weeks after the publication of Whittier's first poem, a second, in blank verse, entitled The Deity, appeared, with an editorial Underwood's Life of Whittier, p. 396. paragraph declaring that his poetry bore the stamp ous and the presage of future distinction as a poet; and Mr. Whittier has never deemed them worth including in his collected to learn the motive of this unusual call. Is this Friend Whittier? was the inquiry. Yes, he responded. We want to see yol, 1828, he invited subscriptions to a volume of poems by Whittier, which it was proposed to publish at Haverhill in order t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
sentimental, or patriotic. Mrs. Hemans continued to be a never-failing source of poetic supply, but only four poems by Whittier appeared, the poet being now engaged in editing the American Manufacturer at Boston, a paper which had been recently ests, he did not regret the experience, as it opened the way to other and more congenial editorial engagements. Our friend Whittier, wrote Mr. Jour. of the Times, Dec. 5, 1828. Garrison, in introducing a poem of his, seems determined to elicit our . Prentice, then conducting the New England Weekly Review at Hartford, in which he was, a year later, to be succeeded by Whittier; but while praising his vigor and independence, Mr. Garrison also criticized the tendency to coarseness which even then 'clock on the afternoon of July 4, Mr. Garrison rose to address an audience which filled Park-Street Church and included Whittier, Goodell, and John Pierpont, whose spirited hymn (With thy pure dews and rains) was ready for the occasion. It was sung
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
d his sentence (N. E. W. Review, May 31, 1830). Prentice soon after resigned his position to Whittier and removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where, as editor of the Journal, he became wholly subservieplied that he had communicated with a friend (Hezekiah Niles) in Baltimore, in compliance with Whittier's request, and had just learned from his correspondent that he had been anticipated, and that t case a worthy one, and to testify thus his appreciation of the support which both Garrison and Whittier had given him in the Journal of the Times and the Boston Manufacturer. He had never seen either of them. Years afterwards he met Whittier in Washington, and asked the poet why he no longer supported him. Whittier frankly replied that he could not support a slaveholder. Clay was pleasant, cWhittier frankly replied that he could not support a slaveholder. Clay was pleasant, cordial, and magnetic in manner. Garrison had nearly completed his seventh week in jail when Lundy received the following letter from a New York merchant, well known for his philanthropy and genero
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
e subscription list of the Liberator, with a prospect of enlarging the paper with the new volume; on the sale of three editions of his Address to the people of color in two months; and on a thousand evidences of the effect of his writings, his public discourse and his daily conversation on the friends and the foes of human freedom. His office was a rendezvous to which came men of all grades and professions—fellow-editors like David Lee Child, Massachusetts Journal and Tribune, Boston; John G. Whittier, New-England Weekly Review, Hartford, as George D. Prentice's successor; William J. Snelling, The Amateur, Boston; Moses Thacher, The Boston Telegraph; and Oliver Johnson; The Christian Soldier, Boston, printed on the Liberator press. These editors, again, were lawyers, ministers, and litterateurs. Oliver Johnson, who was four years younger than Mr. Garrison, was a native of Peacham, Vt., of Massachusetts parentage. He became an apprentice in the office of the Vermont Watchm
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
te my curiosity and interest still more by informing me that my dearly beloved Whittier is a friend and townsman of yours. Can we not induce him to devote his brillion, March 18, 1833. Ms. You think my influence will prevail with my dear Whittier more than yours. I think otherwise. If he has not already blotted my name fre of a house, I will try to come Sabbath after next. I will consult my friend Whittier, and see what can be done. Boston, March 26, 1833. Ms. I have written to Whittier respecting my visit to Haverhill, but have heard nothing from him. Nevertheless, I shall visit your beautiful village on Saturday next, even should no is the song of birds, but sweeter the voices of those we love. To see my dear Whittier once more, full of health and manly beauty, was pleasurable indeed. It wouprentice revisiting the scene of his Ante, p. 34. misdirected training. Mr. Whittier, it should be said, had abated nothing of his friendship, having already in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
the efforts of the New-England Anti-Slavery Society, or any Anti-Slavery Society in the world. Wishing you, therefore, all success, and entreating you to tell your countrymen, on your return, that we in England are all for the Anti-Slavery, not for the Colonization people, I am, my dear sir, with real esteem, Yours respectfully, T. F. Buxton. Mr. Garrison was then introduced by George Thompson, and began a long address in the following terms: I have, my dear Garrison, writes J. G. Whittier from Haverhill, Nov. 10, 1833 (Ms.), just finished reading thy speech at the Exeter Hall meeting. It is full of high and manly truth—terrible in its rebuke, but full of justice. The opening, as a specimen of beautiful composition, I have rarely seen excelled. Mr. Chairman—It is long since I sacrificed all my national, Lib. 3.178. complexional and local prejudices upon the altar of Christian love, and, breaking down the narrow boundaries of a selfish patriotism, inscribed upon
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
In another direction he sped the call to Whittier, on his farm at Haverhill, who answered doubtfully, but eagerly, November 11: John G. Whittier to W. L. Garrison. Thy letter of the 5tor the Quaker City. Slenderer purses than Whittier's were those of some of his Essex County neig. 166. correspondent but the Quaker poet, for Whittier (thanks to the generosity of S. E. Sewall) ha consisting of three Friends (Evan Lewis, John G. Whittier, and Effingham L. Capron, of Uxbridge, Ma and sixty delegates, May says 56 (p. 84); Whittier, 62 (p. 167, Atlantic Monthly, Feb., 1874). T. The doors were locked upon an assembly, as Whittier noticed, mainly composed of comparatively yous writing (May, 1885), Elizur Wright, Jr., J. G. Whittier, and Robert Purvis alone survive. The Quakright, Jr.'s, Sin of slavery and its remedy ; Whittier's Justice and expediency ; Arthur Tappan pthe vigor of Mr. Garrison's propagandism. If Whittier forfeited his political career by his adheren
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
zed—he became a citizen in March, 1830 ( Life, p. 267)—may even have furnished a new ground of resentment, viz., ingratitude. or were Garrison, who wrote, We can only say that we wish we had Lib. 4.143. many more such foreigners among us, and Whittier, who caught up the passage we have just cited, and poetized it in his glowing Stanzas?— Our fellow-countrymen in chains! Speak! shall their agony of prayer Come thrilling to our hearts in vain? To us whose fathers scorned to bear The paltry mtrong—but principles are immutable. There are many able writers and advocates in the ranks of abolitionists, and they all agree in principle, but differ essentially in their manner of writing. Whitter, for instance, is highly poetical, J. G. Whittier. exuberant and beautiful. Stuart is solemn, pungent and severe. C. Stuart. Elizur Wright, Jr. Wright is a thorough logician, dextrous, transparent, straightforward. Beriah Green is manly, eloquent, vigorous, devotional. May is persua
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
d Lib. 5.143; May's Recollections, p. 152. suppose he had done something better than making a fortune. He manifests a lofty spirit and indomitable courage. Our brother Thompson had a narrow escape from the mob Lib. 5.157; Kennedy's J. G. Whittier, p. 112. at Concord, and Whittier was pelted with mud and stones, but he escaped bodily damage. His soul, being intangible, laughed at the salutation. That some of us will be assassinated or abducted, seems more than probable—but there il grateful to Him who I believe watches over our persons and our cause, and will restrain the malice of our foes, or cause our sufferings to advance his glory. Poor Whittier was compelled to receive a tithe of the Lib. 5.157; Kennedy's J. G. Whittier, p. 112. vengeance accumulated for me. I had really little expectation and less desire to be stoned by proxy, but such is the fruit of keeping bad company. My friends must be cautious lest perchance they be made the vicarious victims of that