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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 190 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for J. G. Whittier or search for J. G. Whittier in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
fell the last of our colonial thinkers, John Woolman (1720-1772), the Quaker, a sort of provincial Piers Plowman, whose visions of reform were far ahead of his day. In his Journal, the humble tailor of New Jersey takes up, in order, the evils of war and of lotteries, of negro slavery and excessive labour, of the selling of rum to the Indians, of cruelty to animals. Moreover, like the visions of the Plowman, Woolman's work might be called a contribution to the history of English mysticism. Whittier described the Journal as a classic of the inner life ; Channing, as beyond comparison the sweetest and purest autobiography in the language ; while Charles Lamb urged his readers to get the writings of Woolman by heart. These writings are in marked contrast to the controversial spirit of their time. They avoid entangling alliances with either the old or new divinity, and have little to do with the endless quarrels between Calvinists and Arminians. In place of doctrine and formal creed
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
included the lives of Byron and Shelley and most that was best in those of Tennyson, Arnold, Browning. It began the year following Joel Barlow's American epic The Columbiad, and the publication of The Echo by the Hartford Wits. Longfellow and Whittier were in the cradle, Holmes and Poe unborn. Except Freneau, there were no poets in the country but those imitative versifiers of an already antiquated English fashion whom Bryant was himself to characterize North American review, July, 1818. windependence, antedating Emerson's American scholar by nineteen years. He compassed the generations of all that was once or is still most reputed in American poetry: the generations of Paulding, Percival, Halleck, Drake, Willis, Poe, Longfellow, Whittier, Emerson, Lowell, Whitman, Bret Harte. Yet he was from very early, in imagination and expression, curiously detached from what was going on in poetry around him. The embargo is a boy's echo, significant only for precocious facility and for th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
-wish, the, 300 West, Benjamin, 91 Westchester Farmer, 136, 137 Western Clearings, 318 Weston, Richard, 190 When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloomed, 270 When was the drama introduced in America? 216 n. Whipple, E. P., 244 Whistle, the, 101 Whitby, Daniel, 66 White, Kirk, 263, 270 n., 271 Whitefield, George, 9, 73-75, 77, 78, 81, 91, 103 White-Jacket, 321 Whitemarsh, Thomas, 116, I 17 Whitman, Elizabeth, 285 Whitman, Walt, 261, 262, 266, 268, 270, 271 Whittier, J. G., 86, 261, 262 Who wants a Guinea? 228 Wieland, 289, 292 Wigglesworth, Edward, 73,74, 75 Wigglesworth, Michael, 154, 156-157, 158, 160 Wigglesworth, Samuel, 154 Wilberforce, Bishop, 20 Wild Honeysuckle, the, 183 Wilderness and the War-path, the, 318 Wilkins, E. G., 230 Willard, Rev., Samuel, 158 William Gilmore Simms, 224 n. William Penn, 222, 225 Williams, Roger, 4, 8, 38, 39, 43-45, 50 Willis, Nathaniel Parker, 223, 224, 230, 241-243, 243 n., 262, 280