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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 17 1 Browse Search
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The Richmond Times says: Of General Early's actual force on the ipth of September, 1864, the day of the battle of Winchester, his first defeat, we can give statistics nearly official, procured from an officer of rank who held a high command during the campaign, and who had every opportunity of knowing. Early's infantry consisted of Gordon's Division2,000 Ramseur's Division2,000 Rodes' Division2,500 Breckenridge's Division1,800 Total Infantry8,300 Cavalry-Fitz Lee's Division Wickham's Brigade1,000 Lomax's old Brigade6000 Lomax's Division McCauseland's Brigade800 Johnson's Brigade700 Imboden's Brigade400 Jackson's Brigade300 Total Cavalry3,800 Artillery Three Battalions Light Artillery40 guns One Battalion Horse Artillery12 guns Total guns52 guns About one thousand artillerists. This recapitulation embraces all the forces of Early's command. General Sheridan, according to official statements, had under his command over thirty-five thousand muskets, eig
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Stuart's ride around McClellan in June, 1862. (search)
nction, went that night into bivouac. He embraced the opportunity, after midnight, of riding with Colonel W. H. F. Lee to Hickory Hill, the residence of Colonel Williams Wickham-afterward General Wickham--who had been recently wounded and paroled. Here he went to sleep in his chair after talking with Colonel Wickham, narrowly esGeneral Wickham--who had been recently wounded and paroled. Here he went to sleep in his chair after talking with Colonel Wickham, narrowly escaped capture from the enemy rear, and returning before daylight, advanced with his column straight upon Hanover Court-House. Have you ever visited this picturesque spot, reader? We looked upon it on that day of June-upon its old brick court-house, where Patrick Henry made his famous speech against the parsons, its ancient tavernColonel Wickham, narrowly escaped capture from the enemy rear, and returning before daylight, advanced with his column straight upon Hanover Court-House. Have you ever visited this picturesque spot, reader? We looked upon it on that day of June-upon its old brick court-house, where Patrick Henry made his famous speech against the parsons, its ancient tavern, its modest roofs, the whole surrounded by the fertile fields waving with golden grain-all this we looked at with unusual interest. For in this little bird's nest, lost as it were in a sea of rippling wheat and waving foliage, some Yankee cavalry had taken up their abode; their horses stood ready saddled in the street, and this d
eat, and huge pitchers of ice-waterpenetrating fearlessly the press of trampling hoofs and ministering to the necessities of the rebels with undisguised satisfaction. If the fair girl living in the handsome mansion below Mr. Hamilton's, remembers still to whom she insisted upon presenting nine cups of coffee with every delicacy, the rebel in question begs to assure her of his continued gratitude for her kindness. At Brookville some hundreds of prisoners — the greater part captured by General Wickham in a boat at the Potomac-were paroled and started for Washington, as an act of humanity. At one o'clock in the morning Stuart mounted and moved on, speedily falling asleep in the saddle, and tottering from side to side. In this he was not alone; and I remember the laughable spectacle of Major M— , sitting grave, erect, and motionless upon his horse in front of a country store by the roadside, to which the animal had made his way and halted. The Major seemed to be waiting — for som<
y the gallant Wickham-reached the vicinity of Mountsville. Stuart was riding gaily at the head of his horsemen, when Wickham galloped up from the advance guard, and announced that a heavy picket force was camped at Mountsville, visible through t. Stuart threw one fiery glance in that direction, flashed a second towards the front, and said briefly: Tell Wickham to form on the hill, and bring up Pelham at a gallop! The order was delivered to Wickham; then I went to hurry PelhaWickham; then I went to hurry Pelham. I found him advancing, alone, at a walk, riding a huge artillery horse, his knees drawn up by the short stirrups. The pieces are coming at a gallop, was his smiling answer; anything going on? The General is going to fall back to the hill,f without difficulty from every species of tight place, seemed to be a peculiar faculty of Stuart's. He gave an order to Wickham; the cavalry moved slowly back, with the enemy's shell bursting above them. Pelham limbered up coolly; the column heade