hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 30 results in 6 document sections:

rly's position, Sheridan massed his artillery, protecting it with earthworks. Wickham, in command of Fitz Lee's cavalry, fell back from Front Royal, up the South Foe moved out and put in position to support the other divisions, if necessary. Wickham's cavalry brigade (which had come up the Luray valley and joined Early at Portbe readily reached by roads concealed by forests, by way of Patterson's ford. Wickham's cavalry led the advance, followed by Gordon with artillery, and by Ramseur, attached to Fitz Lee's division, to the command of which Rosser was assigned, Wickham having resigned. On the morning of the 6th the enemy left the camps near Haamps until December 6th, taking the cars at Staunton on the night of the 7th. Wickham's brigade retired that day from Mt. Jackson to Timberville. This movement of On the 22d, Wharton marched back to near Staunton, as did also Payne's and Wickham's brigades. On the 23d, two brigades of Wharton's division took cars at Staun
less than a full regiment in numbers, of Wharton's infantry division, Nelson's battalion of artillery, and the cavalry of Lomax and Rosser. Early established his headquarters in Staunton, placed his artillery in a camp near Waynesboro, cantoned Wharton's infantry near Fishersville, and widely and far to the front distributed his cavalry—practically almost disbanded it—on outpost duty, in Piedmont, in the Valley and in Appalachia, in camps where forage could be obtained for their horses. Wickham's brigade of cavalry at Barboursville, held the line of Robertson river from its head near Milam's gap, and down the Rapidan to the vicinity of Raccoon ford. Rosser's brigade, with headquarters at Swoope's, eight miles west of Staunton, had its advanced pickets at Milford, in the Page valley of the Shenandoah, on the line of Stony creek near Edenburg, in the main Shenandoah valley, at Harper's Ferry, on Lost river, and on the South Fork of the Potomac, some miles south of Moorefield, whil
rations of the Peninsular campaign. In the battle of May 5th at Williamsburg, Colonel Robertson being sick and Lieutenant-Colonel Wickham having been wounded on the previous day, he commanded the regiment in a fierce fight on the Telegraph road, andops at that post. In February, 1863, he was able to rejoin the Fourth regiment, and held command, in the absence of Colonel Wickham, until March 20th, when he was again given command of the Second North Carolina. The gallant Col. Sol Williams, thehe fight at Waynesboro, March 2, 1865. After the close of the war General Wharton lived at Radford. Brigadier-General Williams Carter Wickham Brigadier-General Williams Carter Wickham was the son of William Fanning Wickham and Anne Carter, anBrigadier-General Williams Carter Wickham was the son of William Fanning Wickham and Anne Carter, and the great-grandson of Gen. Thomas Nelson, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the commander-in-chief of the Virginia Line in the Revolutionary army. He was born at Richmond, Va., September 21, 1820, moved with his parents to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
y 24, 1862; major-general, August 3, 1863. Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Ninth Virginia Regiments, Cavalry and Breathed's Battery of Horse Artillery, A. N. Va.; division in August, 1863, composed of cavalry brigades of W. H. F. Lee, Lomax and Wickham; subquently assigned to command of Cavalry Corps, A. N. Va., composed of divisions of W. H. F. Lee, Rosser and Munford. George Washington Custis Lee, captain Corps of Engineers, C. S. A., July 1, 1861; colonel and aide-de-camp to the Presidenier-general, July 8, 1863. Commands—Brigade, composed of Fiftieth, Fifty-first and Sixty-third Regiments, Virginia Infantry, and Thirtieth Battalion, Virginia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia; commanding Breckinridge's Division. Williams Carter Wickham, captain Hanover Dragoons, Fourth Virginia Cavalry, May, 1861; lieutenant-colonel, Fourth Virginia Cavalry, September, 1861; colonel, Fourth Virginia Cavalry, June 9, 1862; brigadier-general, September I, 1863, resigned, November 9, 1864
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
between white master and black slave was just that line, I answer, it was no such dark and dangerous line as exists to-day between the extremes of wealth and poverty; between capital and labor. The interval between Marshall and Marshall's Jack; Wickham and Wickham's Bob, was spanned by a bridge resting on the two great pillars of reverence and sympathy. On these two is laid that structure of law and prophets which binds the State together. When the discussion was transferred to the forum of Wickham's Bob, was spanned by a bridge resting on the two great pillars of reverence and sympathy. On these two is laid that structure of law and prophets which binds the State together. When the discussion was transferred to the forum of force, the proof was made conclusive that this government of honor, by honor, and for honor, was also the government of love, by love and for love. They who had not shrunk from sacrifice, did not shrink from danger. In language which cannot be obliterated, they said: Our bosoms are one. The Virginia which had known how to live greatly knew also how to die greatly. Death for country was sweet and beautiful once more. It is all a dreamland of the past; that garden of fragrance and bloom; of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 113 Page, Richard L., 113 Paxton, E. F., 113 Payne W H., 114,285 Pegram John 114 Pemberton John C., 114 Pickett, Geo. E., 115 Pendleton Wm. N. 114 Pryor Roger A., 115 Randolph, Geo. W, 115 Reynolds, Alex W., 115 Robertson, Heverley H., 115 Rosser, Thos. L., 116 Ruggles, Daniel, 116 Slaughter, J. E., 116 Smith, Wm., 117 Stevens, Walter H., 117 Stevenson, Carter L., 117 Stuart J E. B, 117 Taliaferro Wm. B., 118 Terrell James B., 118 Terry, Wm., 118 Terry. W. R., 119 Walker, Henry E., 119 Walker James A., 119 Walker, R. Lindsey, 119 Weisiger, D A., 119 Wharton Gabriel C.. 120 Wickham, Williams C., 120 Wise, Henry A., 120 Wilcox's Old Brigade at the Crater, 164 Washburn, Gen. C. C., 180 Washington Artillery. 23 Weitzel, Gen., Godfrey, 92 Whiskey, Insurrection of, 1792, 64 White, W. H., 359 Wyatt, Henry W., The first to die in the War, 1861-5, A monument proposed to, 354 Yellow Tavern, Action at, 121 Yancey, W. L, 209