Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wigfall or search for Wigfall in all documents.

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boat Nina. The officer who made the statement expressed himself to be ignorant whether the watch on board the Nina discovered the movement or not; at all events, he said, they did not signify any cognizance of the fact.--(Doc. 8.)--Charleston Mercury, Dec. 28; Mess. Barnwell, Orr, and Adams, the Commissioners appointed by South Carolina to treat with the Federal Government, arrived in Washington to-day. This evening they have held a consultation with a few friends, among whom was Senator Wigfall, of Texas.--Boston Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. Second.--That the said seceding States appoint, by their respective Conventions or Legislatures, as many delegates as they have representatives in the present C
ined in the House of Representatives to-day, by the following resolution, offered by Mr. Adrian, of New Jersey: Resolved, That we fully approve the bold and patriotic act of Major Anderson in withdrawing from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and the determination of the President to maintain that fearless officer in his present condition; and we will support the President in all constitutional measures to enforce the laws and preserve the Union. To-day the arrest of Senators Toombs and Wigfall, on the charges of treason, for sending dispatches to the South recommending the seizure of the forts, was spoken of in the Cabinet jocularly. The Alabama Convention organized at Montgomery, William M. Brooks in the chair.--Times, Jan. 8. The Mississippi Convention organized at Jacksonville, A. J. Barry, of Lowndes, in the chair. It was resolved that a committee of fifteen be appointed by the president, with instructions to prepare and report, as speedily as possible, an ordinanc
eople are not excited, but there is a fixed determination to meet the issue. The Convention has just adjourned, subject to the call of the president. Before adjourning, it passed resolutions approving the conduct of General Twiggs in resigning his commission and turning over the public property under his control to the authorities. Governor Pickens was in secret session with the Convention. About 1,000 troops were sent to the fortifications to-day; 1,800 more go down to-morrow. Messrs. Wigfall, Chesnut, Means, Manning, McGowan, and Boyleston, have received appointments in General Beauregard's staff. A large number of the members of the Convention, after adjournment, volunteered as privates. About 7,000 troops are now at the fortifications. The beginning of the end is coming to a final closing. Fort Sumter will be attacked without waiting for the fleet. Every thing is prepared against a land attack. The enthusiasm is intense, and the eagerness for the conflict, if it mus
e fired now and then to indicate that the fort was not silenced. Thus in truth the work was held while there was a cartridge to fire or powder enough accessible to make one. The flagstaff, which had been hit nine times, was cut at about 1, and the flag was then nailed to the cut piece, and so raised upon the ramparts. At this time both officers and men were compelled to lie flat upon their faces in the casemates, and hold wet cloths to their mouths to escape suffocation. Soon after Ex-Senator Wigfall came to the fort with a flag of truce, which he wished held up while he spoke; but the batteries did not respect it. He, however, represented himself as an aid of General Beauregard, and agreed for the evacuation of Fort Sumter. It was afterward learned that he had spoken falsely, and had no authority whatever from General Beauregard. At 12.55 P. M. the flag of Fort Sumter was drawn down, and the fort was surrendered soon after upon honorable terms; the garrison to carry away the f
of the terms of the blockade. After some discussion, it was agreed that the ships on the bar should have fourteen days to go out. Capt. Poore also made a full survey and soundings of the river.--New Orleans Delta, May 31. A statement of the Geographical arrangements of the army of the United States, corrected to date, is published.--(Doc. 212.) President Davis reached Richmond this morning, accompanied by his nephew, Mr. Joseph Davis, Col. Northrop, of the Confederate Army, and Col. Wigfall. Gov. Letcher and the Executive Council met and received the President at Petersburg. An immense assemblage welcomed his arrival at Richmond, with the most enthusiastic demonstrations of delight. The President, in a brief address, thanked the multitude for the hearty reception given him.--New Orleans Delta, May 30. To-day the American flag was raised over the late residence of Lieutenant-General Scott, at Elizabethtown, N. J., in the presence of about five thousand people. When th
pied Dumfries, Va. From the river to the village the road was strewn with dead horses. Some were in harness attached to wagons. The rebel force in and around Dumfries was composed of Texans, Alabamians, South--Carolinians, under the command of Wigfall, of Texas. About thirty cartridge and cap-boxes, some blankets, flour, etc., were found in the house used as Wigfall's headquarters. A large quantity of shells and cartridges were also stowed away in a barn, and seventy-five boxes of ammunitioWigfall's headquarters. A large quantity of shells and cartridges were also stowed away in a barn, and seventy-five boxes of ammunition were found near the creek.--N. Y. Commercial, March 17. The United States frigate Cumberland, which was sunk by the attack of the Merrimac, rebel steamer, still keeps her masts above water, and the Stars and Stripes are yet flying at her masthead. A Naval expedition, composed of the gunboats Benton, Louisville, Cincinnati, Carondelet and Conestoga, under Flag-Officer Foote, left Cairo, Ill., at seven o'clock this morning. At Columbus they were joined by the Pittsburgh, St. Louis