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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 4, 1864., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Louis T. Wigfall or search for Louis T. Wigfall in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

k., Johnson, of Tenn., Kennedy, Lano (Oregon), Latham, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Slidell, Thomson, of N. J., Toombs, Wigfall, and Yulee--36. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, lost, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, King, Simmons, Sumne Georgia, C. C. Clay and Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, Brown and Davis, of Mississippi, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Mallory and Yulee, of Florida, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, Crittenden and Powell, of Kentucky, A. Johnson and Nicholson, of Tennessee, Green and Polk, of Missouri, R. W. Johnson and Sebastian, of Arkansas--28 f, Brown, Chesnut, Clay, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Hammond, Hunter, Iverson, Lane, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Powell, Rice, Saulsbury, Sebastian, Slidell, Wigfall, and Yulee--23. [All from Slave States but Bright, Lane, and Rice.] 5. Resolved, That, if experience should at any time prove that the Judicial and Executive
party for immediate secession is gaining ground rapidly. It is idle for men to shut their eyes to consequences like this, if anything can be done to avert the evil, while we have power to do it. Messrs. Albert G. Brown, of Mississippi, Louis T. Wigfall, of Texas, and Alfred Iverson, of Georgia, spoke in a similar strain, but even more plainly. Said Mr. Iverson: Gentlemen speak of concession — of the repeal of the Personal Liberty bills. Repeal them all to-morrow, and you cannot stop Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas bill-had now absented themselves or sat silent, and allowed Mr. Clark's resolves to supplant Mr. Crittenden's, which were thus defeated. They doub
inally, Mr. Crittenden moved that the Peace Conference proposition be substituted for his own original project of conciliation; which the Senate refused, by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, directly thereafter, on Mr. Crittenden's original proposition, which was defeated-Yeas 19, Nays 20-as has been stated. The proceedings of the Peace Conference were likewise presented to the House, March 1, 1861. but not acted upon in that body — the report of the Committee of Thirty-three being held entitled to preference. Thus ended in failure t
commenced fire returned Interior of the fort in flames Wigfall's volunteer embassy Anderson surrenders Garrison leaves putting an end to this most unequal contest is due to Louis T. Wigfall, late a Senator from the State of Texas, now styling himself a Confederate Brigadier. Wigfall — a Carolinian by birth, a Nullifier by training, and a duelist by vocation — had tand in rolling out their powder to prevent its explosion — Wigfall seized a skiff on the afternoon of Saturday (the second dap out here, and you will see it waving over the ramparts. Wigfall persisted that the resistance had no longer any justificatrpose. About this time, Maj. Anderson approached, to whom Wigfall announced himself (incorrectly) as a messenger from Gen. Bter a few more civil interchanges of words, to no purpose, Wigfall retired, and was soon succeeded by ex-Senator Chesnut, ander A. Pryor and W. Porcher Miles, who assured Maj. A. that Wigfall had acted entirely without authority. Maj. A. thereupon o<
gman and Thomas Bragg, Senators from North Carolina; James Chesnut, Jr., a Senator from South Carolina; A. O. P. Nicholson, a Senator from Tennessee; William K. Sebastian and Charles B. Mitchell, Senators from Arkansas; and John Hemphill and Louis T. Wigfall, Senators from Texas, have failed to appear in their seats in the Senate, and to aid the Government in this important crisis; and it is apparent to the Senate that said Senators are engaged in said conspiracy for the destruction of the Unionwith full knowledge of such conspiracy, have failed to advise the Government of its progress, or aid in its suppression: Therefore, Resolved, That the said Mason, Hunter, Clingman, Bragg, Chesnut, Nicholson, Sebastian, Mitchell, Hemphill, and Wigfall, be, and they hereby are, each and all of them, expelled from the Senate of the United States. Messrs. Bayard, of Del., and Latham, of Cal., sought to have this so modified as merely to declare the seats of the indicated Senators vacant and
the West, 412; closely invested, 436; Gen. Scott favors the evacuation of, 436; Col. Lamon's visit to Charleston, 442; commencement of the bombardment, 443-4; map of the contest; enthusiasm of the defenders, 445; report of an eye-witness, 446-7; Wigfall visits the fort, 448; the surrender, 448-9; great excitement at the North, 453; the President's Message, 556. Fort Walker, bombarded, 604; captured, 605. Foster, Ephraim H., on annexation, 172. Foster, Henry D., of Pa., beaten, by Curti 66. White, J. W., letter from T. A. Andrews to, 367. White, Lieut.-Col., at Carnifex Ferry, 525. White, Major frank J., 591-2. Whitfield, John W., 237; 240; 241; sacks and burns Osawatomie, 245. Whittier, John G., poem by, 630. Wigfall, Lewis T., of Texas, 373; 448. Wilcox, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Wild Cat, Ky., Rebels defeated at, 615-16. Wilkes, Capt., seizes Mason and Slidell, 606-7. Wilkesbarre, Pa., fugitive-slave case at, 216. Williams, Euphemia, t