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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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p is provided for injecting combustible fluid, to mix with the solid fuel in the furnace, and all the volatile products of combustion are passed through the working-cylinder, the induction and eduction valves being worked in the usual manner. Wilcox, May 16, 1865. This engine is substantially on the principle of the engine of Sir George Cayleys (about 1830). The fire is fed with air, under pressure of a pump, and the volatile products of combustion are passed through the working-cylinder. by pipe B, to the valve-chest I. The raising of the valve admits air to the effective space below the piston, and closes by the tripping of the adjustable cut-off arrangement; this is effected late or early in the stroke, as may be required. Wilcox's air-engine. The doors of the furnace and ash-pit are secured by cramps and hollow bolts to the walls, and are removable to replenish the fuel, or for grinding or packing to make an air-tight joint. 2. The second class is as the principle
brakes are at once applied to the wheels. See brake, p. 356. There have been numerous attempts to secure automatic and simultaneous action, throughout the cars of a train, by power derived from a single impulse or operation. Room cannot be spared for their systematic description, but the following patents may be consulted: — Bessemer (English)1841Hodge1860 Hancock (English)1841Dwelley1865 Nasmyth (English)1839Davidson1860 Petit1840Marsh1864 Birch1840Virdin1859 Carr (English)1841Wilcox1856 Walber1852De Bergues1868 Fuller1859Chatelier1868 Sickels1857Lee1868 Cuney1855Ambler1862 Goodale1865Branch1858 Peddle1867McCrone1865 Car-buf′fer. (Railway.) A fender between cars. In the English practice, the ends of the car-frames carry elastic cushions, or buffer-heads with springs. In our practice the spring is usually behind the drawbar. See buffer. Car-bump′er. An elastic arrangement to lessen the jerk incident to the contact of colliding cars as the
, and tents), and two surgeons' wagons constitute a hospital train for a division, and will accommodate 200 patients, requiring 13 surgeons and 74 men for their care. Hot-air Engine. One driven by the heating of a body of air admitted to the cylinder. They are of two kinds:— First, those which draw their supplies directly from the atmosphere, and discharge them into the atmosphere again after they have produced their effect. Such are the Ericsson, Stillman, Roper, Baldwin, Messer, Wilcox engines, described on pp. 40-43. See also Dr. Barnard's report on the French Exposition, pp. 34-40, and plate 1. Second, those which employ continually the same air, which is alternately heated and cooled, but which is not allowed to escape. Such are the Glazebrook (1797), Parkinson and Crosley (1827), Laubereau (1849), Schwartz, described on pp. 43, 44. These and other distinguishing features are described under air-engine(which see). Hot-air Fur′nace. One in which air is heate
table et al.May 30, 1871. 120,654MansonNov. 7, 1871. 121,532MacauleyDec. 5, 1871. 121,638Manson (Reissue.)Dec. 5, 1871. 121,745BarnesDec. 12, 1871. 124,812GreerMar. 19, 1872. 126,421SquierMay 7, 1872. 126,441BouchardMay 7, 1872. 127,129WilcoxMay 21, 1872. 129,998Warren et al.July 30, 1872. 131,614HowellSept. 24, 1872. 133,760Cleveland et al.Dec. 10, 1872. 134,526DuntonJan. 7, 1873. 141,367MansonJuly 29, 1873. 148,225MansonMar. 3, 1874. 150,141FayApr. 28, 1874. 152,633Herrintonng a shield, label, or escutcheon, according to shape, on which a number, as 500 or 1,000, is worked, as familiar, especially in smaller denominations, to all of us. The securities of the government are printed on distinctive paper, made by J. M. Wilcox, of Glen Mills, Delaware County, Pennsylvania. The essential feature of this paper is a localized fiber imbedded in the body of the paper at the time of its manufacture on the Fourdrinier machine (1, Plate XXXVII.). By the localization of dif
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
en condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captain Smith had been put to death. Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
en condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captain Smith had been put to death. Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
(Manchester Artillery)—(7). On Longstreet's wing. Attached to Hood's Division, (Major B. W. Frobel, Chief of Artillery).—Bachman's South Carolina Battery; Garden's South Carolina Battery; Reilly's North Carolina Battery—(3). Attached to Wilcox's Division.—Anderson's (Thomas Artillery), with Wilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's DiviWilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's Division). Brown's (Wise Artillery)—(1). Attached to Evans's Brigade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artillery, Colonel J: B. Walton.—Squire's (First Company); Richardson's (Second Company); Miller's (Third Company); Eshleman's (Fourth Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
t until he reached the hospitable mansion of Judge Isaac H. Christian, in the vicinage of Charles City Courthouse. Here he and his staff were received in the most cordial manner and entertained in princely style under some lovely shade trees in the yard. After partaking of some refreshments, Stuart and his staff slept for several hours. About twilight Stuart, after making all necessary arrangements with Colonel Fitz Lee, with whom he left his command at Buckland, the residence of Colonel J. M. Wilcox, with instructions to follow at 11 o'clock that evening, left with Captain R. E. Frayser, his guide, and a courier for the headquarters of General Lee, near Richmond. The distance from Buckland to Richmond is about thirty miles, and the country through which he had to pass lay in the enemy's lines, and the route he took is known as the James River road. While he was liable to capture by scouting parties, he dashed over the road without the least fear. At Rowland's Mill, about six m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
arke, Acting Adjutant General, and requested him to find out the cause and effect of the prolonged firing. This was between 2 and 3 o'clock on the morning of April 2. Major Starke returned before daylight and reported that the enemy had part of our line near the Rives' salient, and that matters looked critical on the lines in front of the city. This he communicated to General Hill at Venable's. Before sunrise General Hill came over and asked Colonel Palmer if he had any report from Generals Wilcox and Heth, whose divisions on the right extended from the front of Fort Gregg to and beyond Burgess's Mill, on Hatcher's Run. The Colonel told him that he had heard nothing from them, and had nothing further to report beyond Major Starke's statement. The General then passed on to his tent, and a few minutes later the Colonel, noticing his colored servant, Charles, leading the General's saddled horse to his tent, ran to him just as he was mounting and asked permission to accompany him
Brunswick — John E. Shell, Jas. B. Mallory, E. H. H. Blick. Buchanon — J. A. Gillipsie, Jacob Dea', Elisha Carter. Buckingham — E. S. Ellis, T. M. Bondurant, L. W. Cabell. Cabell — Ira McGinnis, H. H. Miller, P. C. Buffington. Calhoun — G, W. Silcott, Perry Hays, Harrison Ferrell. Campbell — Bowling Clarke, O G. Clay, C. H. Lynch. Caroline — W. C. Moncure, D. C. Dejarnette, W. A. Backner. Carroll — James J. Hill, Edmund Marshall, Wm. Kyle. Charles City — John A Selden, J. M. Wilcox, Hill Carter. Charlotte — Powhatan Bouldin, W. H. Dennis, J. W. Marshall. Chesterfield — Jas. H. Cox. Chas. T. Friend, S. Bassett French. Clarke — Ed. McCormick, John Morgan, H. M. Nelson. Clay — B. Stephenson, Marshall Triplett, Jacob Salisberry. Craig — R. M. Wiley, Andrew McCariney, C. C. Hill. Culpeper — James Barbour, J. O. Harris, J. H. Rixey. Cumberland — E. J. Harrison, T. H. Woodson, J. D. isbell. Dinwiddie — Thomas B. Hamlin, Wm. Tur