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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 1 1 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Second Brigade, Col. J. Irvin Gregg. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. J. H. Wilson.First Brigade, Col. T. M. Bryan, Jr. Second Brigade, Col. Geo. H. Chapman. Maj.-Gen. A. E. Burnside, commanding Ninth Army Corps. First Division, Brig.-Gen. T. G. Stevenson.First Brigade, Col. Sumner Carruth. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel Leasure. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter.First Brigade, Col. Zenas R. Bliss. Second Brigade, Col. Simon G. Griffin. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Orlando B. Wilcox.First Brigade, Col. John F. Hartranft. Second Brigade, Col. Benj. C. Christ. Fourth Division, Brig.-Gen. Edward Ferrero.First Brigade, Col. Joshua K. Sigfried. Second Brigade, Col. Henry G. Thomas. Provisional Brigade, Col. Elisha G. Marshall. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt, commanding Artillery. Reserve, Col. H. S. Burton. First Brigade, Col. J. H. Kitching. Second Brigade, Maj. J. A. Tompkins. First Brig. Horse Art., Capt. J. M. Robertson. Second Brigade Horse A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery defenders of Fort Gregg. (search)
back to Fort Gregg to put his guns in position in the fort. This he did; and there meeting General Wilcox I heard him (Wilcox) order his aid, Captain Frank Ward (now of Baltimore) to go to General HWilcox) order his aid, Captain Frank Ward (now of Baltimore) to go to General Harris and order him to withdraw his command and place it in the two forts—Gregg and Whitworth. I directed McElroy to pile up all the canister that was in the limber-chests upon the platform, so as to ravine to carry out our orders, and there separated. Upon reaching the Gregg house I met General Wilcox, and told him what my orders were from General Walker. He said, with much emphasis: The gunved the remnant of hisc ommand by withdrawing from Whitworth, in compliance with orders from General Wilcox. The defence of Gregg has been often described. I witnessed the three assaults from Batten in Fort Gregg—maybe more; sixty-seven were reported killed, and General Gibbon stated to General Wilcox at Appomattox that he lost eight hundred men in the assault. How many of the two hundred me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
Petersburg. He arrived there on the 22d, and promptly commenced the destruction of the railroad track. His infantry force consisted of Gibbons' and Miles' divisions, and in the afternoon of the 25th, he was reinforced by the division of Orlando B. Wilcox, which however, arrived too late to be of any substantial service to him. Gregg's division of calvary, with an additional brigade, commanded by Spear, was with him. He had abundant artillery, consisting in part of the Tenth Massachusetts bank's Neck bridge, three miles from Reams' Station, and awaited advices from Hampton. The Confederate force actually present at Ream's Station consisted of Cook's and McRae's brigades, of Heth's division; Lane's, Scales and McGowan's brigades, of Wilcox's division; Anderson's brigade, of Longstreet's corps; two brigades of Mahone's division; Butler's and W. H. F. Lee's divisions of cavalry, and a portion of Pegram's battery of artillery. General Hampton, commanding cavalry, marched at daylight
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
m Petersburg. He arrived there on the 22nd and promptly commenced the destruction of the railroad track. His infantry force consisted of Gibbons' and Miles' divisions, and in the afternoon of the 25th he was reinforced by the division of Orlando B. Wilcox, which, however, arrived too late to be of any substantial service to him. Gregg's division of cavalry with an additional brigade commanded by Spear, was with him. He had abundant artillery, consisting in part of the 10th Massachusetts batt's Neck Bridge, three miles from Ream's station, and awaited advice from Hampton. The Confederate force actually present at Ream's station, consisted of Cooke's and MacRae's brigades of Heth's divisions, Lane's, Scales' and McGowan's brigades of Wilcox's division, Anderson's brigade of Longstreet's corps, two brigades of Mahone's division, Butler's and W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry, and a portion of Pegram's battalion of artillery. Being the central regiment of the brigade, MacRae's lin