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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wilcox or search for Wilcox in all documents.

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of the enemy has been serious, as the ground in front of our works was literally covered with his dead. At midnight on Saturday night, General Lee began to fall back. On Sunday morning, he formed the line of battle beyond Culpeper; but although the enemy had forced the guard at Kelly's Ford, and compelled General Rhodes to fall back with a loss of two hundred men killed, wounded, and missing, yet no attack was made on us by the infantry. In the afternoon, the enemy's cavalry attacked General Wilcox's brigade, and were badly cut up. During Sunday night General Lee fell back to his old position south of the Rapidan. P. S.--Lieutenants Morrison, Lefler, and Maynard, of the Fifty-seventh, are all safe. John Paris, Chaplain Fifty-fourth Regiment N. C. T. General Meade's congratulatory order. headquarters army of the Potomac, November 9. General order No. 101. The Commanding General congratulates the army upon the recent successful passage of the Rappahannock in the f
November, Colonel Foster reports that communication was cut off between the army at Knoxville and that portion under General Wilcox, stationed at and near Bull's Gap. On the eighteenth, his division, with General Wilcox's whole command, crossed theGeneral Wilcox's whole command, crossed the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication with Knoxville. He found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry between that point and Knoxville, and, after some skirmishing, followed General Wilcox's column to Tazewell. From Bean Station, the First cavalry brigade, Colonel Garrard, was despatched to Rogersville, to watch the enemy's forces advancing from Virginia, and protect the rear of General Wilcox's column and train while crossing Clynch Mountain. They camped on the north bank of Clynch River. This brigade had some heavy skirmishing with the division of the enemy's cavalry under Jones, and with the infantry under Ransom,