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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. M. Wilcox or search for J. M. Wilcox in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
en condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captain Smith had been put to death. Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
en condemned to be hung in Philadelphia. Colonel Corcoran was given to understand that he would be hung on the day after authentic information was received that Captain Smith had been put to death. Thirteen others, drawn by lot, were placed in close confinement to await the issue of the hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
(Manchester Artillery)—(7). On Longstreet's wing. Attached to Hood's Division, (Major B. W. Frobel, Chief of Artillery).—Bachman's South Carolina Battery; Garden's South Carolina Battery; Reilly's North Carolina Battery—(3). Attached to Wilcox's Division.—Anderson's (Thomas Artillery), with Wilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's DiviWilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's Division). Brown's (Wise Artillery)—(1). Attached to Evans's Brigade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artillery, Colonel J: B. Walton.—Squire's (First Company); Richardson's (Second Company); Miller's (Third Company); Eshleman's (Fourth Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
t until he reached the hospitable mansion of Judge Isaac H. Christian, in the vicinage of Charles City Courthouse. Here he and his staff were received in the most cordial manner and entertained in princely style under some lovely shade trees in the yard. After partaking of some refreshments, Stuart and his staff slept for several hours. About twilight Stuart, after making all necessary arrangements with Colonel Fitz Lee, with whom he left his command at Buckland, the residence of Colonel J. M. Wilcox, with instructions to follow at 11 o'clock that evening, left with Captain R. E. Frayser, his guide, and a courier for the headquarters of General Lee, near Richmond. The distance from Buckland to Richmond is about thirty miles, and the country through which he had to pass lay in the enemy's lines, and the route he took is known as the James River road. While he was liable to capture by scouting parties, he dashed over the road without the least fear. At Rowland's Mill, about six m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
arke, Acting Adjutant General, and requested him to find out the cause and effect of the prolonged firing. This was between 2 and 3 o'clock on the morning of April 2. Major Starke returned before daylight and reported that the enemy had part of our line near the Rives' salient, and that matters looked critical on the lines in front of the city. This he communicated to General Hill at Venable's. Before sunrise General Hill came over and asked Colonel Palmer if he had any report from Generals Wilcox and Heth, whose divisions on the right extended from the front of Fort Gregg to and beyond Burgess's Mill, on Hatcher's Run. The Colonel told him that he had heard nothing from them, and had nothing further to report beyond Major Starke's statement. The General then passed on to his tent, and a few minutes later the Colonel, noticing his colored servant, Charles, leading the General's saddled horse to his tent, ran to him just as he was mounting and asked permission to accompany him