Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wilkes or search for Wilkes in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ever heard anything so sweet as her singing. December 19th.—The morning papers are fraught with interest. John Bull is aroused at the outrage committed by Captain Wilkes in seizing our Commissioners on board a British ship, and if they are not given up immediately England will break the Southern blockade, open trade with the Cved in the rain at this pretty and thriving city, and as we had only a night there could see very little of it; but Mr. Jno. E. Elgin, General F. H. Robertson, Mayor Wilkes and their committee, met us at the depot, and escorted us to very comfortable quarters at the Pacific Hotel, and showed us every necessary attention. We had lwithstanding the bad weather and muddy streets there was a fine audience, among them fifty young ladies of the Waco University and a number of other ladies. Mayor Wilkes, in appropriate terms introduced the General who was frequently applauded by the appreciative audience. Then followed the banquet where the feast of good th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
s morning, I was overjoyed to see in the morning papers the announcement that England had demanded the surrender of Mason and Slidell. Attended a concert at the Theatre this evening. The attendance was the largest and most select that I have ever seen in Memphis. Miss Bang, the Jenny Lind of America, was the attraction. I have never heard anything so sweet as her singing. December 19th.—The morning papers are fraught with interest. John Bull is aroused at the outrage committed by Captain Wilkes in seizing our Commissioners on board a British ship, and if they are not given up immediately England will break the Southern blockade, open trade with the Confederate States, and blockade the Northern ports. Behold how brightly breaks the morning! December 21st.—There are few cases of interest in the hospital. Patients come in slowly, and we are discharging them rapidly. On Monday the Southern Mothers and the Overton are to be merged into one hospital, the Confederate Government
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
the next morning we had to bid them adieu and take the cars for Waco. We arrived in the rain at this pretty and thriving city, and as we had only a night there could see very little of it; but Mr. Jno. E. Elgin, General F. H. Robertson, Mayor Wilkes and their committee, met us at the depot, and escorted us to very comfortable quarters at the Pacific Hotel, and showed us every necessary attention. We had lost our good friend, Captain Minnigerode, at Austin, he being compelled by business te. At night General Lee lectured, under the auspices of the Waco Lyceum, and notwithstanding the bad weather and muddy streets there was a fine audience, among them fifty young ladies of the Waco University and a number of other ladies. Mayor Wilkes, in appropriate terms introduced the General who was frequently applauded by the appreciative audience. Then followed the banquet where the feast of good things was accompanied by appropriate toasts, and speaking. Corsicana was our ne